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July 08, 1978 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-07-08

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Page 10-Saturday, July 8, 1978-The Michigan Doily
VAGUE ECONOMIC PLEDGES MADE
European leaders close
BREMEN, West Germany (AP) - basic approval to the new monetary swered the question of how far it will g
Led by West German Chancellor arrangement, aimed at stabilizing to meet U.S. demands (hat it step u
Helmut Schmidt, the Common Market European currencies and government spending or cut taxe
nations closed a two-day summit strengthening the dollar. massively to stimulate the economy
meeting yesterday with a vague pledge The summit participants pledged The theory is that this would generat
to stimulate their economies but clearly new economic growth to battle inflation more demand for imported goods an
determined to press President Carter and unemployment but did not publicly raw materials and in that way improv
for a U.S. energy program in return. commit themselves to specific growth- the economic situation in other coun
The nine European leaders drew up rate targets. This vague formulation tries.
their give-and-take plan as a strategy was along the lines of what Schmidt and The nine nations also pledged them
for hard bargaining at the July 16-17 the West Germans had been cam- selves to energy restraint - reducin
economic conference in Bonn with Car- paigning for in preparation for the their dependence on imported energ
ter and the leaders of Japan and world economic conference. from about 60 per cent of their needs a
Canada. A FINAL conference statement said present to 50 per cent by 1985. This se
SCHMIDT, government chief of only that countries without serious in- ved as another reminder to Washingto
Europe's richest nation and host of the flation or balance-of-payment problems of its failure to develop a comprehei
two-day meeting, also announced vir- should "do more," depending on "in- sive energy program.,
tual agreement on a "most major and dividual situations," to stimulate their SCHMIDT LEFT no doubt that at th
imaginative scheme" for reworking economies. Bonn summit July 16-17 the Europea
Europe's currency system. West Germany thereby left unan- partners will push the United States fo
He said Carter had already given his

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or

ull's'Sex & Violins'

(Continuedfrom Page6)
WHEN MARTIN and Mull get
together, the result always seems to be
comedic magic. On the last LP they co-
wrote an a capella number, "Men";
this time it's "Westward Ho!", easily
the most unusual travelogue through
the old west ever presented:
We eat our lunch, we shoot our meals
Grandpa's caught in the wagon wheels
See him as he spins around
Well, damn his ass, he's slowin'us down!
The music is classic Wagon Train;
Tommy Morgan's harmonica and
Tommy Tedesco's banjo fit in perfectly
with the clip-clop of horses' hooves.
Eddie Wise breaks in with a little
obligatory saloon piano about half-way
through the tune, and Mull sings the
song with a perfect wagonmaster in-
flection.

LEVY FROM
mssSTORE~
J «
-07 ELIBERTY 663-8611-

DURING RECENT appearances on
The Midnight Special and The Tonight
Show, Mull performed "I'll Do the
Samba," a tune which uniquely com-
bines the musical forms of samba and
Sousa march. The topic of the lyric is
marital differences; the problem is ob-
vious when Mull sings "The
phonograph is playing our old favorite
song/So I'll do the samba while you
march along."
Mull plays off the listener's sense of
absurdity, and his aim is amazingly
direct. Others before him have used the
concept of musical absurdity, (notably,
Loudon Wainwright III and the Bonzo
Dog Band), but Mull remains con-
sistent with his sense of what is
humorous, and the result is always en-
tertaining.
ONE CAN almost foresee this sense
simply by reading the song titles: "I
Haven't the Vegas Idea," "Cleveland
(Revisited)," and "Trailer Waltz." The
latter recounts the tragedy of a tornado
striking a mobile home park; all that
remains for the residents is "a salad
made of cinder blocks and shoes."
My own wish is that America 2-Night
enjoys a long stay on the late-night air-
waves and that Mull continues his
recording career as well. He is one of
the funniest people around, and the
more of his work that is available, the
better.
We have it all
together
Pinball, Billiards,
and Bowling
at the
UNION
Open Every (ay

summit
a reduction in its own dependence on
foreign oil - 43 per cent of its consum-
ption.
The Europeans also are expected to
press Japan to reduce its heavy trade
surplus with West Europe - the im-
balance between its huge export
volume to the Common Market and its
smaller import volume from Europe.
THE INFLATION rate in the nine
countries as a whole was 7.4 per cent in
the past year, and the unemployment
rate currently is 5.3 per cent.
Several leaders said they were sur-
prised by the progress made at the
summit. The other participants were
Britain, France, Italy, Belgium, the
Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland and
Luxembourg.
The main discordant note came from
British reservations about the new
monetary system, designed by Schmidt
and French President Valery Giscard
d'Estaing.
It calls for each participating nation
to contribute 20 per cent of its monetary
reserves to a central fund for suppor-
ting the value of European currencies.
Proponents say this would mean that
speculation against the dollar or any
European currency on world money
markets could be countered with some
$30 billion inreserve funds if necessary.
Scholarships
(Continued from Page 3)
State Competitive Scholarship
program.
Jursanadded that close to 18,500
Michigan students will receive a por-
tion of the grant money.
"With the cost of higher education
continuing to rise, these federal funds
will make it possible for more of our
young people to continue their studies,"
said state School Superintendent John
Porter.
g9et what
they want
(Coninued from Page 6)
manipulator.
After the Some Girls tunes, the band
launched into "Tumbling Dice," "Hap-
py," and "Brown Sugar," finally en-
ding with a rousing "Jumping Jack
Flash" and Jagger tossing three
buckets of water on the folks down
front.
With Keith Richard's drug ordeal, it's
become a standard item to throw in
some portentous statement aout this
likely being the last chance anyone will
have to see the Stones. All that aside,
they were here in full bloom on Thur-
sday, and evidently have other things
on their minds besides fading away.

Tonight-8 P.M.
Sunday-2 and 8 P.M.
LAST PERFORMANCESi
Power Center
Box Office Opens 6 P.M. Sat..
Noon-2 and 6-8 P.M..Sun.
July 5-9-The Musical Version of Shakespeare's Play
TWO GENTLEMEN
1 1 / U D X T , ... ,. 763-333

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