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June 03, 1978 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-06-03

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, June 3, 1978-Page 11
Goodness! Me working in a lab!

(Continued from Page9)
Sandy slices brains in order to make
slides. Do you know how long it takes to
section a section of a frozen sheep
brain? Don't ask.
So what keeps me there? The people,
of course. Everyone is on a first name
basis, rank is usually not pulled,
everyone is highly competent and in-
telligent. I must admit to having some
fears when I first started that everyone
in the lab would be like the stereotyped
pre-med student. Studious to ridiculous
lengths, unable to talk even semi-
intelligently on any subject other than
hard-core science, uncultured,
illiterate and truly dull. Fortunately,
most of the people who work in my lab
are not suck dolts. Theater, sports,
opera, camping, cooking, books,
politics-all are frequently discussed in
lab conversation. and what's even more
enjoyable is -the varied racial
backgrounds and geographic locations.
Kathy swears by Chicago, and Bob, a
native San Franciscian, when asked
about finding a job in L.A., bat-
ted his eyes and incredulously
responded "Why would anyone
want to live there?" Alice is from
Manhattan (I'm also a New Yorker)
and still hasn't answered my query as
to why she's living in the midwest. She
just kept saying "Why am I here?"
over and over again till the sound of her
voice was inaudible. Bloomingdale's,
Altmant, Wannamaker's. Sigh.
BESIDES being friendly and helpful,
no one seems to tower over everyone
else as the boss. Everything is team-
oriented. For example, the Endocrine
Meetings, a scientific conference being
held in Miami this year begins in a
week. Scientists from the whole country
come and give ten-minute talks,
showing what discoveries they've un-
covered in the year. Many members of
my lab are giving talks, so they prepare

them now and give them in front of
everyone in the lab, a sort of trial run.
The audience the critiques everything,
from conclusions poorly drawn to poor
graph layouts. I'm waiting to add my 2
concerning the deliveries. Bob assures
me that you can't get bored by a ten
minute speech. Yawn.
I am independent. I can work at 4
a.m. or 3 p.m. I can ask what may be
silly questions and get straightforward
answers. I can take an hour for lunch. I
am consulted about my work. I am
depended upon, and in short, I'm a
member of a very hard-working
organization. An average work week
running 50-70 hours is, for most scien-
tists in the lab, not unusual.

There are some advantages to being
a scientist. One is that you stop thinking
of the U.S. as a world, because you deal
frequently with scientists in other coun-
tries. If one heard snatches of conver-
sation, one would think a group of
wealthy jet-setters met for lunch "Well,
I want to go to Paris to hear that
new-" "Oh, I've been there, but Dr.
Smith, you know, in Melbourne, is so
much better-" "Marvelous cafe in
Melbourne, on-" "We just received a
paper from Sweden about ... " etc. As
a matter of fact, we just had a visitor
in from Britain, a delightful chap who
informed us that "knowing" the queen
is still a capital offenseand detailed
what it's like to fish the traditional

Japanese way, in Tokyo Bay of course.
Tres cosmopolitan.
Well, I have to help with sheep
surgery tomorrow. I'm not looking for-
ward to it, being hot, and muggy,
smelling the sheep, and itching. But I
know everyone else will feel the same
way, perhaps more so. Maybe someone
will win the Nobel prize. The Oscar or
Tony of Science.
Constant curiosity.
That's what keeps everybody going.
The federal government owns and
operates a fleet of nearly 191,000 trucks,
which makes it the motor vehicle in-
dustry's biggest truck user, says the
Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Associa-
tion.

I

The originsi
,is still here.
BOWLING
at the UNION
Open 'tilI
1 a.m. tonight

and mow a word
_ _m
Our HALL BOOK RUSH 1978
JUNE 5-21
1. Applications Taken from June 5 through June 21, 1978 Will Receive Equal Condidera-
tion With Applications Taken April 3-21 for FALL BOOK RUSH. A Lottery System will be used
for these applications to determine hiring order.
Ii. The Cellar Will take applications at later times than indicated in (1); however, subsequent
applications will be placed in hiring order by Date of Application, and they will receive
priority after those taken in (1).
ill. Former Rush Employees in good standing Need Not Reapply for FALL RUSH and will
receive top priority over all other applicants.
IV. All applicants hired for FALL RUSH will be notified by phone or mail later in the summer.
-Rush employees hired to work in August should expect to work through and beyond regis-
tration. HOWEVER, all rush jobs are, unfortunately, only temporary. Starting pay is $2.93
per hour.
V. Permanent positions which may open up after Rush will be filled by employees who worked
FALL RUSH. Post-Rush hiring is done departmentally, on the basis of the employee's Rush
performance and their availability for the unified hours.
VI. After SEPTEMBER 30, 1978, all unused applications will be thrown away. Therefore, appli-
cants must reapply for each future rush that they wish to work. ABSOLUTELY NO APPLICA-
TIONS WILL BE UPDATED OR KEPT ON FILE FOR FUTURE RUSHES.
UNFORTUNATELY, WE HAVE ABSOLUTELY NO JOBS AVAILABLE CURRENTLY OR FOR THE
SUMMER. SORRY, THESE ARE RUSH JOB OPENINGS ONLY.
Further Information and or Applications may be obtained at the Info Desk
in the rear of The Cellar, in the basement of the Michigan Union.
10 ithe". 530. State Street-open Mon.-Fri. 9;3Q-5:30, Sat. 12- Sun.-closed .,

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For Locations in Other Cities, Call:
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