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June 02, 1978 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-06-02

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, June 2, 1978--Page 11

Ala. senator Allen dead at 65

GULF SHORES, Ala. (AP) - U.S.
Sen. James B. Allen, (D-Ala.), died
Thursday after suffering an apparent
heart attack, a friend of the family said.
Allen was 65.
Allen's death was confirmed by
Mobile Press-Register State Editor
Buddy Smith, who said his wife was
with Mrs. Allenin the hospital chapel.
Ben Davis, a longtime newspaper

executive vacationing at Gulf Shores,
said witnesses told him Allen seemed to
suffer a heart attack and then fell down
stairs at a condominium.
He said the witnesses described Allen
as looking "ashen and in awfully bad
shape" and that paramedics had to get
him breathing again.
TOM COKER, an aide to Allen, left
Montgomery to go to South Baldwin

Hospital in Foley, where the senator
was taken after "some kind of attack,"
Coker's wife said.
Allen was a leader among foes of the
two Panama Canal treaties that were
approved by the Senate March 16 and
April 18.
Because he frequently held the
Senate floor for hours on end during the
debate, his voice became known to
millions who listened to the live broad.
cast of the proceedings on National
Public Radio.
THE SENATOR consistently
referred to Panamanian leader Omar
Torrijos as "Dictator Torrijos," a
characterization known to have
angered Torrijos.
The conservative Alabama senator,
known as a master of Senate rules,
frequently delayed or blocked liberal
proposals over the years by sustaining
filibusters on the Senate floor.

He offered few legislative proposals
of his own and was probably the most
conservative figure among Senate
Democrats in recent years.
ALLEN WAS born Dec. 28, 1912 in
Gadsden, Ala., where he attended
public schools. He received his college
training at the University of Alabama
and his law degree from that in-
stitution's law school.
He began his law practice in 1936 in
Dadsden, where he practiced until
retiring on Dec. 31, 1968 to devote full
time to his duties in the Senate.
He served in the Alabama statehouse
as state representative from 1938 to
1942. He was re-elected to that post in
1942 but resigned to serve in the U.S.
Navy from 1943 to 1946 stationed in the
Pacific theater.
He was a member of the Alabama
Senate from 1946 to 1950 and was
Alabama lieutenant governor for two
terms from 1951 to 1955 and 1963 to 1967.

Syrians consent
(ContinuedfromPage1)

Assad hinted he will try to work out a
peaceful coexistence formula between
Palestinians and the Lebanese army in
the south.
"IT IS NOT impossible to harmonize
the two issues," he said. But he
declined to elaborate, saying "what
concerns the Palestine Liberation
Organization we shall discuss with PLO
leadership."
Assad or his foreign minister, Abdul

Halim Khaddam, was expected to meet
soon with Arafat to discuss the outcome
of the Latakia summit.
Asked whether Syrian troops in
Lebanon would be allowed to enter
south Lebanon with the Lebanese ar-
my, Assad said;'These troops are under
President Sarkis' command. We wan-
ted to move deeper south in the past but
we heeded President Sarkis'orders not
to."

Public ignores
cancer warnings
(Continued on Page 2)
the artificial sweetener to bladder can- to their disease.
cer in male rats. "Nothing has Opponents of the proposed saccharin
changed," said one company official. bansue that a normal person must
BILL JONES, a general sales consume 600 12ounce cans of diet soda
manager of the Coca-Cola Bottling daily during an average lifespan to
Works Co., makers of diet Tab, sum- equal the dosage fed test rats.
med up the prevailing mood: "I don't And a University of Pittsburgh
think the signs will make any differen- physicist said the benefits of diet drinks
ce. Look at the warnings on cigarettes. outweigh the risks attached to excess
They're selling more now than ever." weight. Dr. Bernard L. Cohen, in Scien-
Pharmacies, however, report a dif- ce Magazine, wrote, "... substitution of
ferent story. Sales of saccharin tablets diet for non-diet drinks would increase
are way down, but the new warnings life expectancy by 100 times more than
are anticlimactic. the cancer risk reduced it."
"We stopped getting saccharin
customers last year," said Ben Rose, a
New York City pharmacist. "Saccharin Francois Truffaut's 1976
in bottles is more forbidding than in
pink packets. People can more easily SMALL CHANGE
ignore the possible threat when they Truffaut's warm, we lerful and
buy Sweet 'n' Low, and many just don't whimsical exploration of childhood
realize an 'artificial sweetener' usually from the brave curiosity of a toddler
reize a'artific swostto the exciting embarassment of
is saccharin," he said. adolescent love. In color, French
The new warning, which must appear (with subtitles) and a beautiful 35
even in the smallest convenience store mm print.
selling saccharin products, was sat: ADAM'S RIB
authorized after Congress delayed for sun: CHAPLIN (free)
18 months a proposed Federal Food and
Drug Administration ban on the ar- CINEMA GUILD
tificial sweetener.
The delay came after Congress and Toni a :30 930
the FDA were deluged by letters from $So
consumers protesting the ban. A $1.4
million study is under way to in-
vestigage 3,0 bladder cancer patients
to determine what factors contributed
CINEMA II
presents
CAMILLE
Director-GEORGE CUKOR, 1936
The screen adaptation of Dumas' LA DAME AUX CAMELIA,
portrays Greta Garbo as a tragic courtesan dying of TB in 19th
century Paris, with Robert Taylor as her lover. Garbo's
exquisite performance (cough, cough) and Cukor's stylish
direction turned an otherwise absurd tale into a distinguished
piece of film craft. Bring your hankies.
$1.50 7:30 & 9:30 ANGELL HALL, AUD A
TOMORROW; .Rrir's."THE RIVER"

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