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June 02, 1978 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Friday, June 2, 1978-The Michigan Daily

MMAP AMIMSMIAOf AT :0
" " a r a

Cool Russian spring
delays wheat harvest

9nff MMWIWN V RUIlpwnnn

-" " 451ND 451 TOWIT&F AI DKIAKWVVU A£-JACEh3 10jC PENhEr

DAILY EARLY BIRD MATINEES -- Adults $1.25
DISCOUNT IS FOR SHOWS STARTING BEFORE 1:30
MON. thru SAT. 10 A.M. til l1!3 P.M. SUN. & HOLS. 12 Noon til 1:30 P.M.
EVENING ADMISSIONS AFTER 5:00, $3.50 ADULTS
Monday-Saturday 1:30-5:00, Admission $2.50 Adult and Students
Sundays and Holidays 1:30 to Close, $3.50 Adults, $2.50 Students
Sunday-Thursday Evenings Student $ Senior Citizen Discounts
Children 12 And Under, Admissions $1.25
TICKET SALES -
1. Tickets sold no sooner than 30 minutes
prior to showtipne.,
2. No tickets sold later than 15 minutes
after showtime.

MOSCOW (AP)-Cool, wet weather
has delayed spring planting of Russian
wheat, raising prospects of a poor har-
vest and further purchases from the
non-communist world, Western
agriculture experts said yesterday.
In a country where summers are
short, the unusually late planting
means the Soviets are running "an in-
creased risk" that winter will set in
before summer wheat is ripe, the ex-
perts noted.
"THEY COULD be in real trouble,"
said a Western diplomat who has
analyzed the Russian wheat situation
over several years.
Summer wheat accounts for about
two-thirds of the Soviet crop, with the
rest coming as winter. wheat-which
apparently is in "generally good"
shape this year, according to early
reports.
The experts ,said it is too early to
forecast how the total Soviet crop will
turn out for 1978. A very hot summer,
for example, could bring the wheat to
maturity in time despite the late plan-
ting.
BUT A POOR harvest this year, they
said, could create a situation like that in
1972, when surprisingly large Soviet
purchases of wheat and corn from the

West helped send world prices soaring.
Since then, the United States has taken
steps to moderate any potential price
spiral due to Russian buying.
U.S. officials here said Ameican
grain stocks should be sufficient to
meet any large Soviet demand in 1978.
Canada, Australia and Argentina also
sell wheat to the Russians.
American officials will conduct an in-
spection later this month of the winter
wheat crop ready for harvest in the
Ukraine and the north Caucasus. These
area produce about 10 percent of all
Soviet wheat.
THE AMERICANS are not allowed to
view wheat growing in other, major
producing areas: the Chernozem zone
in central Russia, the Volga Valley,
western Siberia, and the so-called
virgin lands of northeast Kazakhstan
and the southern Ural region.
Thus, the U.S. and other Western ex-
perts often have problems with their
overall estimates.
In 1977, for example, the U.S.
Agriculture Department estimated the
Soviet crop at between 215 million and
240 million tons. The former figure is
considered a good harvest. But the crop
came in at 194 million tons.

"Hooray for Jill Clayburghl She makes
the jump to star in this marvelous film."
People Magazine
U

10:30
12:45
3:45
7:15
9:45

!House
WALTER MATTHAU
GLENDA JACKSON
ART CARNEY
RICHARD BENJAMIN

10:15
1:15
4:00
6:45
6:45
1:15

It'll blow your mind! I

Harburg to perform
(Continued from Page 9) During the 60s, according to Harburg
the song "When the idle poor become the younger, Yip was turned off by the
the idle rich." amplification, guitars and what he calls
Then came black listing. Harburg undisciplined improvisation of popular
claims, "It was an era which people music. "I was very flattered to work
don't believe now, where America with some of the best composers
seemed like Russia during its darkest America ever had. These are all great
days; where writers and entertainers musicians. We don't have them
and people who were more or less for anymore. They weren't imitative, they
the New Deal were considered were original, they didn't work on elec-
dangerous because they wanted tronic machinery. They had melody."
welfare and medicare for the poor. All "MOSTLY I like to write satire where
the things that were considered left but I can laugh at the follies of mankind, or
were not left but forward. We all lost to express beauty in nature and people.
our jobs." I like to make, people laugh at
Harburg himself was called up before meaningful things. It's a commentary
the HUAC but somehow was never sub- on life but without the bitterness."
poenaed by them. He was black-balled As to what you might hear at the
from the movies but continued on Earle this Sunday, says Ernie, "He'll
Broadway, where he endured several sing all the old classics and tell how
flops until he made the musical- these songs came about. His voice, at
Jamaica for Lena Horne. the present time, is very lilted and soft.
Although he is all of 82, Harburg is It used to be stronger. The thing about
happy to play at the Earle, which is listening to Yip sing his own songs is it
owned by the younger Harburg. "Ernie doesn't sound like anyone else singing
is taking after me. He's doing with food his songs. He gives an interpretation to
what I'm doing with songs. If I were it that doesn't sound like anyone else. It
running that restaurant, my slogan sounds like two different songs. It's
would be 'Oh what food these morsels very moving." Harburg will be accom-
be.' Ernie is trying to have the standar- panied by Richmond Browne, Univer-
ds of Shakespeare in his food." sity music professor, on piano.

10:40
1:00
4:15
7:00
9:30

BURT REYNOLDS
"THE'EkA.

11

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperetive
presents at MLB 4
Friday, June 2
THE KID
(Charlie Chaplin,1921) 7 & 10:20-MLB4
Chaplin's first feature is a milestone in screen comedy! Charlie finds an
abandoned baby (Jackie Coogan) and unofficially adopts him as his own.
"A picture with a smile and perhaps a tear." Plus Short: THE IDLE CLASS
(1921), an unusual Chaplin short. Charlie plays a dual role-as his familiar
tramp and as a millionaire.
THE CIRCUS
(Charlie Chaplin, 1928) 8:40 ONLY-MLB 4
Possibly Chaplin's funniest film includes some of the tramp's finest sustained
moments of high comedy. Plus Short: A DAY'S PLEASURE (1919). One of
Chaplin's rarest short films shows just what Charlie could do with such typicaf
silent comedy props as the Model T Ford and a folding deck chair.
TOMORROW: "YOUNGRANKENSTEIN"

U ~

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