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May 18, 1978 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-18

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Page 8-Thursday, May 18, 1978-The Michigan Daily
(Continued fromPage 3)
ACCORDING TO Breakey, the coun-
c tcil tries to alter the drinking habits of
chronic alcoholics and problem
drinkers by helping them focus on their
problem and "learn to drink in a way
cmothat's not destructive"
ifOClLSES OThe council is supported by the
United Fund and some state money and
1 is staffed by trained counselors. The
service is paid for on a scale deter-
mined by the amount of treatment
received.
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) also
a ae operates in Washtenaw County. AA
workers are volunteers, most of whom
have been in the program themselves.

work"-helping others who share their
problem.
GEORGIA DOMKE, an AA worker,
takes calls from the AA switchboard in
her own home and tries to persuade
callers tocome to AA meetings.
"Many times they just want to talk,
but it depends on the situation and what
condition they are in for what I say to
them," said Domke.
Local bartenders are perhaps all too
aware of alcohol problems in the area.
Most formulate their own policies for
customers who have obviously ex-
ceeded their drinking capacity.
"THIS IS SOMETHING we deal with
every day, not just one day or week a
year," said Harvey Blanchard,

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Student Newspaper at The University of Michigan
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proprietor of the Flame Bar. "We wat-
ch people when they come in the door,
and we don't serve them if they've had
too much to drink."
Tony Cellentani, a bartender at the
Fireside Lounge, said it is sometimes
hard to tell if a customer has had too
much to drink.
"Once I was ready not to serve
somebody because they weren't
walking straight," recalls Cellentani.
"Then I found out his foot was in a
cast."
Nick Dmitre of the Liberty Inn said
his policy is to "cut them off when I
think they've had enough and they
usually understand I'm doing it for
their own good."
Companies
boycott
Ugandan
coffee
By The Assciated Press
Several of the nation's biggest coffee
companies yesterday said they have
stopped buying coffee from Uganda to
protest policies of that nation's dic-
tator, Idi Amin.
The statements came a day after the
House International Relations Commit-
tee approved a resolution condemning
Amin and calling on President Carter to
"support. and where possible im-
plement, measuressuch as an embargo
on trade with Uganda . . . ."
SOON AFTER the resolution passed,
Folger Coffee Co., the largest
American importer of coffee from
Uganda, announced Tuesday that it
would buy no more beans from the
African nation because of Amin.
Other firms which said they have
already cut purchases included such
major retail suppliers as General
Foods, Nestle, and Hills Bros.
The companies' action is not expec-
ted to mean much to consumers'
pocketbooks, however.
HE NOTED THAT European coun-
tries and roasters for the huge "in-
stitutional" part of the coffee
business-restaurants, office and fac-
tory cafeterias and so on-would
almost certainly continue buying ugan-
dan coffee.
During the first nine months of 1977,
the latest period for which figures are
available, Ameican companies bought
110.4 million pounds of coffee from
Uganda, valued at $216.4 million, and
Folger had been accounting for about
one-fifth of the total.
General Foods, the nation's largest
coffee seller, said when asked yester-
day that it hasn't bought any coffee
directly from Uganda since December
and will cease immediately any in-
direct purchase through importers and
brokers-a response to the
congressional resolution.
GENERAL FOODS sells several
brands of coffee, including Maxwell
House.
The Nestle Company Inc., o White
Plains, N.Y., said it had stopped buying
Ugandan coffee a month ago, adding
that Uganda had become a supplier of
last resort anyway. As of April 20, the
firm said, it had "decided to discon-
tinue all Ugandan coffee purchases in
light of requests made by members of
U.S. Congress."
A spokesman for Hills Bros. Coffee
Inc., Sharon Swanson, said the com-
pany's purchase of coffee from Uganda
within the past year was less -than t5
per'cent'of alit tffce,ad* n de hdd'
been bought since January.'t, '5-r

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