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May 18, 1978 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 6-Thursday, May 18, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Wallace closes political door

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) -
Lacking the drive that thrust him into
the national spotlight as a lecturn-
thumping firebrand, Gov. George
Wallace is calling it quits after 32 years
of political life.
Almost 15 years after he burst onto
the national scene as an arch
segregationist with his "stand in the
'I don't intend to be in-
volved in any campaign
at all.'
-George Wallace
schoolhouse door" at the University of
Alabama, Wallace announced Tuesday
night that he is withdrawing as a can-
didate for the U.S. Senate. By law, he is
unable to run for a third straight term
as governor.
AT A NEWS conference yesterday af-
ternoon, Wallace, looking relaxed and
fit with a newly acquired tan, said his
decision to withdraw from the Senate
campaign is final. But he shed little
light on the reasons behind his action.
Although he declined to acknowledge
in specific terms that he is retiring

from politics altogether, he told repor-
ters, "I don't intend to be involved in
any campaign at all."
"I just decided I don't want to run,"
Wallace said in response to repeated
questions from reporters crowded onto
his Capitol office,
WALLACE DISCOUNTED
speculation that his health may have
been a factor in the decision, saying,
"my health is in good shape. I'm all
right."
In a joking use of campaign rhetoric
from earlier days, Wallace added,
"maybe thinking about being around
that many 'pointy-heads' at one time"
had something to do with his decision
not to go to Washington. "I don't know
whether I could take it," he said with a
grin.
Wallace said he is relieved at not
having to face another campaign, but
still regrets not being in a race "I could
have won."
PRESS AIDE BILLY Camp said the
58-year-old governor, newly divorced
and confined to a wheelchair with
paralyzed legs, will probably return to
"private life" in Montgomery after
leaving office next January.
Why did Wallace decide to abandon
almost the only way of life he has ever
known?
"He just didn't want to run," said
Camp.
See WALLACE, Page 12

CINEMAII
ANIMATION NIGHT
Thursday, May 18
No Saturday morning cartoons tonight-only the incredible sights and sounds
of contemporary animation. An unprecedented selection of over a dozen
rarely seen animated films produced by independent artists in the U.S. and
Canada. Socio-political motifs, computer animation, and pure entertainment
combined for a unique blend. A must for those who enjoy the stimulating
and boundless world of animation.
$1.50 7:30 & 9:30 MLB 4
Tomorrow: Blonde Venus and Platinum Blond
THE OFFICE OF MAJOR EVENTS IS PROUD TO PRtESENT:

ALABAMA GOV. GEORGE WALLACE announced Tuesday night during a speech
in Mobile that he was withdrawing from the U.S. Senate race. Since Wallace
cannot succeed himself as governor, that decision seems to mean he is withdraw-
ing from politics after a 32-year career.
Static-filled 'FM': A
movie to tune out

(ContinuedfromPage5)
Mull engages in some fancy mugging
Barth Gimble-style, lending his role
enough devil-may-care insanity to
bolster a few laughs. Cleavon Little
passes, but just barely (largely due to a
lack of originality) as the cool "Prince"
of the midnight airwaves. Eileen Bren-

Warren Zevon
composer -writer extroordinaire of:
Poor Poor Pitiful Me " "Werewolves of
London," "Hasten Down the Wind" ,
also appearing Richard Belzer
Wed. May 24-Power Center 8 pm
Reserved Seats $7-$6
Tickets availoble at the Michigan Union Box Ofice
(763-2071) Mon.-Fri. Sorry, no per sonal checks
Please no smoking or beverages in auditoriums
Aso appearing: Doug Henning's "'Ward of Magc" Sat May0 PovesCenter
Rserved Seats $7.50-56.50

ob Marley
he wailers
S. May 18--111 Aad. 8 pm
ed Seats $7-$6-$5
bor will be Morley's first
pearance in two years.
s available at Hill Aud.
it beginning at 6.

nan, whose on-the-air character is an
artsy, breathy-voiced weirdo who calls
herself "Mother," -is simply an ob-
noxious pain-in-the-neck.
YET IF ONE ignores the hackneyed
preaching, the tired characterizations,
one still doesn't arrive at the essence of
FM's failure. The soundtrack, typifying
the film's faddish nature, is overloaded
with last year's hits (just as the sets are
plastered by posters of last year's
albums), including songs from
Foreigner's album, Steve Miller's "Fly
Like an Eagle," the Eagles' "Life in the
Fast Lane," Boz Scaggs' "Lido Shuf-
fle," and Ronstadt's concert renditions
(obviously not filmed before a live
audience) of "Poor, Poor, Pitiful Me"
and "Tumbling Dice."
Given that the selection is trendy as
all get-out, it still seems that with all
that music at his disposal - and it plays
in the background incessantly - direc-
tor John Alonzo could have lent the film
a bit of crude energy and overcome his
weak script in the tacky manner of
American Hot Wax. Unfortunately, the
omnipresent soundtrack doesn't do
much besides hang like wet laundry,
and the film has the energy one would
expect from a story about the
dangerous exploits of a company of
librarians.
Like many of its fellow bombs, FM is
infinitely more interesting as a cultural
artifact than as entertainment. Since it
is so anti-commercialism, why not give
the clods behind it, as well as yourself,
a break? Aoid shellingo ut the three
bucks.

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