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May 10, 1978 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Wednesday, May 10, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Court opens more'U' meetings

(Continued from Page 1)
positions.
The University's attorney stated that
such reports, "if considered in public
session would constitute a clearly un-
warranted invasion of the privacy of
the individuals under consideration (for
employment)."
Although no firm decision has been
made, Daane said he was "considering
a motion for rehearing on that point."
The court also made a final ruling in
favor of the Regents, saying the press
was not entitled to attend meetings
where reports were made on the
possible misuse or misappropriation of
OLD DINOSAUR
DETROIT (AP)-Robert Dawley, a
Wayne State University graduate
student in paleontology, has discovered
what may be the oldest remains of a
dinosaur found in North America.
Dawley said the 180-million-to 190-
million-year-old remains-including
bones, teeth and vertebrae-are those
of "either the earliest dinosaur or the
theodent, of which the dinosaur is a
direct descendant."
The remains were found in an ex-
cavation in Wyoming.
"It was a retired sheepherder,
George Clark, who accidentally noticed
the bones scattered around the area (in
the foothills of the Big Horn Moun-
tains)," Dawley said. "He notified
Wyoming University, which in turn told
us when we got there."
Dr. John Ostrom, a paleontology
professor at Yale University, said the
find may be the only one of its kind in
North America and perhaps the oldest.

University funds.
ANOTHER summary judgment in
the Regents' favor allows them to ex-
clude newspeople from meetings in
which the University's attorney
discusses matters concerning the
Michigan Open Meetings Act.
In what may be considered to be a
temporary victory for the Regents, the
court ruled that a trial would also be
held to determine the legality of
barring the press from meetings where
evaluations of deans or other em-
ployees were made and where
promotions were discussed.
Daane explained that Monday's court
ruling was part of a legal process which
began when the newspaper filed the
lawsuit. At that time the newspaper
asked for an injunction prohibiting the
Regents from continuing those five
practices on which the lawsuit was
based.
THESE INCLUDED the Regents'
closed meetings for various purposes.
In order to facilitate the court action,
the newspaper asked for a summary
judgment. In other words, the
newspaper asked the court to decide the
legality of all the points in question
without going through a full trial.
As of Monday the court had issued
one temporary injunction against the
Regents, two summary judgments in
favor of the Regents, and one summary
judgment in the newspaper's favor.
All issues which have not yet been
finally decided will be ruled on in a Cir-
cuit Court trial at some time in the
future, according to Daane.

Doily Photo
THE REGENTS ARE shown here at a recent meeting. Yesterday's ruling means
more of these meeting will soon be open to the public.

Off Campus College
Work Stutdyr Jobs
Available NOW
Assistant Director
Teachers Aides
Bookkeepers
Research Analyst
Mental Health Worker
Graphic Artist'
Recreation
Park Maintenance
Editor and Writer
Social Workers
Legal Assistants
Planning Interns
Average wage
$3.50 per hour
CALL: T-C Urban Corps
484-0380
Mon.-Fri. 12:00-5:00 p.m.

Little ordered
back to N.C.
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP)-Joan Little
who said she would "rather die" than
return to prison in North Carolina, was
ordered back to that state yesterday by
the New York Court of Appeals.
The court, the state's highest, stayed
the order for 10 days. William Kunstler,
Little's lawyer, said he would file or
appeal in federal court.
LITTLE, WHO IS black, won national
attention in 1975 when she was acquit-
ted of charges that she killed awhite
North Carolina jailer who she said had
attacked her sexually.
She escaped from prison in Raleigh,
N.C., last October while serving a 7- to
10-year sentence for housebraking, and
was recaptured in New York City in
December.
Kunstler claimed to have evidence o
a conspiracy to murder Miss Little if
she were returned to prison in North
Carolina.

,
't
5
1
1
A
j

Son of Sam to he
senteneed May 22

NEW YORK (AP)-Confessed Son of
Sam killer David Berkowitz was back
' in an 8- by 12-foot psychiatric cell
yesterday awaiting multiple sentencing
for six .44-caliber slayings that could
cost him no more than 30 years in
prison, or five years per victim.
f "I direct that he be remained to
Kings County Hospital," said Justice
Joseph Coros of Brooklyn's Supreme
Court as he accepted the first of
Berkowitz's six guilty pleas Monday.
SINCE SHORTLY after his arrest
last Aug. 10, the 24-year-old ex-
infantryman and postal clerk has been
lodged on the sixth floor of the
hospital's psychiatric ward.
In November, when he asked for a
'change of view," he was moved to his
current room. Its doors and windows
are covered by steel mesh. The pudgy
Berkowitz is taken out of his cell to wat-
ch television n a recreation room three
times a day, one hour at a time, with
only guards as companions.
He is said to eat well and sleep well,
and one corrections officer reported/
"He gets thousands of letters. They
send him sweaters, candy, even
money."
JUSTICE CORSO and justices from
Queens and the Bronx who took part in
Berkowitz's three-ply plea to the Son of
Sam murders in the three counties
scheduled sentencing for May 22.
The maximum penalty for murder is
25 years to life. Assuming he gets six
. ,tch tgr psp pnvpr more of them ark
beoasetine,gthetpstbheopold ise 3
before becoming eligible for parole is 30

years.
New insight into Berkowitz's mental
state was presented in psychiatric
testimony released Monday by Corso. It
was transcribed during a final com-
petency hearing last month.
ON THE BASIS of that testimony,
Corso held Berkowitz capable of under-
standing the charges against him and of
assisting his attorneys in a trial. His
sanity at the time of the shootings was
notan issue.
Berkowitz made no mention Monday
of the demons which he said tormented
his soul and drove him out in the night
at the command of a reincarnated 6;000-
year-old man called "Sam" to take the
lives of one long-haired young man and
five women. Injured in the various at-
tacks also were seven other persons.
In the competency hearing tran-
script, a defense psychiatrist, Dr. Mar-
tin Lubin, said Berkowitz hoped to
exorcise his demons by preaching the
gospel to fellow prisoners when he goes
to prison. He now feels, the psychiatrist
added, that he is "inhabited by Christ."
A court-appointed psychiatrist, Dr.
Richard Weidenbacher, testified at the
hearing that Berkowitz's born-again
Christianity was a step away from his
obsession with demons and an evidence
of growing sensitivity to the feelings
and wishes of others.
Meanwhile, Fire Commissioner
Augustus Beekman pledged an inquiry
into revelation at Monday's court
session that Berkowitz kept a diary in
which he meticulously recorded, 1,441
l'ehe lained to havesefrom1974to
shortly before hisarrest last year,

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