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August 12, 1977 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-08-12

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Fridoy, August 12, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Congress optimistic on
passage of Panama pact

WASHINGTON (/P - Backers of the newly
negotiated Panama Canal pact braced yesterday
for a difficult ratification fight in the Senate, but
administration officials were optimistic of mus-
tering the needed two-thrds support.
Senators who contend the United States should
keep the canal vowed an all-out effort to block
ratification of the proposed new treaty, .which
would transfer control of the canal to Panama by
the year 2000.
AND TWO critics of the proposed treaty, Sens.
James McClure (R-Idaho) and Jesse Helms (R-
N.C.) threatened a lawsuit to block it.
The agreement, reached by Carter administra-
Lion and Panamanian negotiators Wednesday,
would replace the 1903 treaty giving the United
States perpetual control over the canal and the
adjacent Canal Zone.
Sens. John Sparkman (D-Ala.) and Clifford

Case (R-N.J.), chairman and ranking minority
member of the Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, voiced guarded support for the effort.
THEY SAID they "fully support the negotiating
effort" and "believe it is in our national interest
to develop a new relationship with Panama."
But in a cautiously worded joint statement, the
two committee leaders noted, "We wish to make
it clear, however, that our endorsement of the
negotiations should not be construed as an auto-
.matic endorsement of a new Panama Canal
agreement."
It will require the affirmative vote of 67 sena-
tors to approve a new treaty.
RECENT administration head c o u n t s show
about 50 senators inclined to back a new treaty,
See CONGRESS, Page 10

State gets solar energy research grant

By LORI CARRUTHERS The program, administered
Toe state of Michigan has re- by the Energy Research and
cened a $280,000 grant to fi- Development Administration (E
nance the planning stages of a RDA) regional centers, will o-
ReginalSolr Enrgy Re-ordinate efforts with the Fed-
Regional Solar Energy Re- eral Solar Energy Research In-
sarch Center. Michian, paR stitute (SERI) in Colorado.
will be working jointly with "fHE RESEARCH center is
Mimnesota on this project. ent-rely in the planning stages
AATA Won't okay
fact I e terms

By SUE WARNER
In an executive session
Wednesday night, the Ann Ar-
bor Transportation Authority
(As TA) beard decided itrcould
nut accept the terms recoin-
mended by a state-appointed
fact finder as settlement for
AA'TsA s ontoing contract dis
pute with the Transportation
Employes Union '(TEUt)
We're ecry concerned about
the impact of the settlement
over the next few years." Nan-
cy Crumb,, Administrative As-
sis'ant to AATA Exeiste Di-
teeter Karl Guenther said yes-
terday.
A C C 0 R D I N G T O
Crumb, if the authority ere to
accept the terms recommended
in the report, AATA would be
forked to increase fares 40 per
cent or cut back services by
five per cent.
Following an eight-day walk-
out last month, the TEU mem-
bership agreed to return to

work under the terms of their
previous contract while nego-
tia tons continued and fact find-
ing took place. The contract is
sow set to expire on Augusts15.
'E EU sotkespersons have stat-
ed that the union is willing to
ig-ree to the fact finder's re-
coniiendations. I towever, the
fat finder's report is not bind-
it_ on either side of the nego
tist oits.
Uti 1 SAID AATA is espe-
ciil;i cincerned with the re-
utirt s ires-ommnsdations regartt
iny states and mianagetment's
ah its to coitract OUt work
xisi persots outside the un-
ias. She said the AATA bar-
eiig team has presented
nes offers on both points.
Meanwhile, both sides disa-
grei on exactly what the fact
finder, Southfield Attorney Wal
ter Nussbaurm, recommended as
a wage proposal. AATA con-
tends the figure is an 11.2 per
cent increase while TEU main-
tains it is only 7.4 per cent.

- what can and should be
done," Irving Rozian, consult-
ant to the project from Michi-
gnd) Energy and Resource Re-
search Association (MERRA),
said.
In January of 1978 a perma-
net program is expected to be
established. Though ERtDA
would prefer only one main re-
search center established in
each region, it is possible that
Michigan and Minnesota will
continue to work together.
"Indications are that as long
as Michigan and Minnesota's
joint operation works effective-
ly, it will be approved," Roz-
ian said.
BUT SPECULATION*
ctrtiues as to whether one or
two centers will be established
in the North Central Region.
'You are asking for a crystal
bali - there might even be sev-
eral throughout the region. No-
bodiv ko%s for sore," Univer-
sitstProf. Joseph Martin said.
"We hase been Working with
the people from Minnesota for
two or three months. But we
are a long way from a firm or-
atuiation but by the end of
the year we'll have worked
Ot, the procedures," Martin
Ihe university will likely gain
frou solar research done with-
in the state and the University
is not isolating itself from the
planning of a regional research
center.
Coordinated efforts of the re-
goinal research center and the
University could lead to fur-
ther developments not neces-
See STATE, Page 7

A sure sign that summer's end is near, University Cellar
staff member Martha DeFore unloads only one of the many
boxes of books for Fall term's 'book rush.'
'U' staff gears upfor
annual Falonslugt
By SUE WARNER
As University students from Oshkosh to tiigkak begin pack-
ing up their worldly possessions for their autumn trek back to
Ann Arbor, University officials are also gearing up for the an-
nual barrage of the returning masses.
When asked what preparations his office was naking for
the fall blitz, John Finn, Director of ltouising lnfornation joked,
"We're not making any, we're guing ti run away and hide."
SERIOUSLY TIIOUGII, FINN SAID the hIosusing office is
busv discussing atcriiative pirl(1s fur accisitomdaling an (Uer
flsiw of freshmtas students in the Uniterisity residence ha ls.
"We're goiii to he crrdedi " he said, i"nl it's especitlly
tight for frestman. But tthatt dhscsn' timnlwe isi' s't be able
to accommodate them."
DESPITE 'tIlE PRtO1tIEMS IIE FAt ES gni igait stidcnt
lissing in the (tlt, iun sayl he still l 1stks liieril ti basing
the students hack. 'I get excited about it 'Ihere'. a lt i e:ld
aches, but that's whtit keeps ic young
English prf I.tyall l'iiwers said he is pretsring fur fal
term by resting. Alth ougb they'll soon he busy revisiig lecture
otes and planning new courses, Powers csintends that most facu-
ty members anxiously awsait the return iof their eager proteges.
"Mont of its iniok forward to the students coming back, "Pow
ers asserts. "One has a sense of new beginnings and new op-
tioltuInities.
UNIVERSITY VICE-PRESIDENT for Student Services leu-
ry Johnson, says his office is itdustrisusly preparitg to deal
See 'U', Page 6

TODAY

Highway robbery?
Did you ever wish, say when you were filing your
income tax, that you could get back at the govern-
ment? Well Ms. Burger of Unionville, Iowa doesn't
have to wish, she's got the state government right
in the palm of her hand. It seems the county acci-
dentally sold her part of one of its highways for a
measly $5, and Burger wants to be compensated be-
fore she'll return the land. "I don't want to just give
it back," she said, "so I proposed that if the county
would gravel our lane at our farm, I'd give them their
highway back." Burger, who bought the 300-foot by
100-foot lot containing part of the highway in a tax
sale in July, has been offered $4,500 by a Missouri
man for it. Court officials say the sale should be
voded since the road is a farm-to-market highway,
but they can't figure out how to do it. The county said
the mix-up occurred because although the county bought
the lot in 1965, the sale was never deeded to the sec-
ondary road department.

Happenings?
. do not begin or end today since there are none.
Eh, what's up Doc?
A carrot-munching executive who sends his secre-
tary to the grocery store for his supply has won the
first "pettiest office procedure" award presented by
Cleveland Women Working. The award certificate pre-
sented with some ceremony Wednesday was accom-
panied by a week's supply of carrots - and a map
showing the route to the vegetable outlet near his
office. It went to the law firm of Kelley, McCann &
Livingstone. The organization said the unidentified ex-
ecutive is one of the farm's senior partners whom the
women dubbed the "14-carrot boss." A representative
of the women's group, Cathy Tombow, explained the
contest, which began July 26, was designed to call
attention to what she described as the ridiculous and
degrading tasks women often are reqired to perform
in connection with their jobs.

On the outside?
The rash of totally unpredictable weather has
so demoralized the U.S. Weather Service that the
meteorologists have walked off their jobs, and
refuse to return until "Mother Nature gets her
act together," For the duration of the strike,
we have enlisted the services of a Tibetan mys-
tic who has correctly predicted the weather in
the Himalyas for 10,000 consecutive days (it has
snowed, and been cold every day for 30 years).
Unfortunately, the mystic does not speak Eng-
lish, and we do not speak Tibetan, so we are
unable to give you the complete report. But we
have been able to translate some words, and
near as we can tell it will rain half of today
and be sunny for the other half, but we can's
tell which half will be which. The high will be
79, and tonight's low will be in the mid-50s. We
are importing a Tibetan interpreter from the
U.N. tomorrow, and will hopefully be able to
give you a full report then.

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