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July 19, 1977 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ruesday, July 19, 1977
Masterfu
By GERARD PAPE
BYRON JANIS is a pianist who has been
a major proponent of American music; un-
fortunately, the American music he perform-
ed July 11 at Rackham was of uneven quality.
Janis had a split program - the first half
was devoted to the classics of Schumann, Schu-
bert and Chopin. The second half was devoted
to the aforementioned Americans - in particu-
la", Copland, Gottschalf, and Janis, himself.
Janis is a very physical pianist, his body echoe-
ing the emotions that his- fingers evoke. Schu-
mann's variations on a theme of Clara Wieck,
his second offering, evoked a set of rising and
subsiding waves, echoed by the contortions of
Janis' body.
Janis' rendition of Schdbert's impromptu in
E-flat was like looking into a clear pond and
seeing ripples of lyrical sweetness. This piece
also contained a middle, dramatic, somber sec-
tion that was sandwiched between the lighter
sections.
JANIS' CHOPIN rendition was the real high-
light of the evening. The intensely expressive
Nocturne in D-flat and the graceful and delight-
ful singing and prancing of the Waltzes in G-flat
and E-flat major were excellent. However, the
best performance was the Sonata in B-minor. This
longer work of Chopin opened with a section of
dark frenzy followed by a beautiful melody of
light and consolation. The famous Funeral March
section followed and the piece concluded with
the triumph of the swirling, rushing void of the
ever faster "presto" section.
The second half of the concert's first piece,
Copland's Piano Sonata, was a real disappoint-
ment but Janis' playing was still quite good. The
piece, an example of poor non-tonal writing, was

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage seven

maestro

Art1Ws.
David Keeps, Arts Editor
Phone 764-0562
4-
IThere IS a difference:!!:( o.,
PREPARE FOR: jjar
MCATO DATeSAT@ SAT
GRE i GMAT * OCAT*. VAT
car broad range of programs provides an umbrlla of ost
ing liow-ho that enablesstoaoft he 0est tips oi
aval oomstterewih oure s Oerd3-ei
of experionce and success Small classes Vommnious
Sawsstudy ma rials.Courses at a onst ly up
lited Permaetasentrs opanday sovningu&wee-
ends all year Complete tape facilties for review of class
lessonsand for use of supplementary materials. Make -ups
for missed lessons at our centers
ECFMG 0 FLEX
NAT'L MEDICAL & DENTAL BOARDS
Flexible Programs & Hours
Write or col'
1945 PAULINE BLVD.
ANN ARBOR 48103 W /Al
662-3149Q Wif
CALL~ollreO 800'.22198 40 F DUcATIONAL cENTER
Cen _rs'nMayr'U Ciiestnd ugrn Sexotond
, EST PREPARATION
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938mo
co--

JuuI/S
very weak contrapuntally although somewhat
interesting rythmically.
Janis' own Three Son s in the Popular Style,
although harmonically unoriginal, were pleasant.
The first "Joy" was quite passionate, the sec-
ond "Sadness" was richly melodic and the last
"In Flight" was quite appropriately and descrip-
tively titled.
The last piece on the program, "The Banjo"
by Gottschalk, was a tour de force of technique
in its emulation of a banjo and quite interesting
in its use of interwoven folk song elements.
All in all, Janis' program was commendable
in its variety even if uneven in musical quality.
In any case, Janis' playing was consistently su-
perb.

Art fare and all that azz

By DAVID KEEPS
BORED BY THE
PROSPECT OF
THE ART FAIR?
You could stay home and
watch TV, or, better yet, you
might check out an exhibition
of local video artists, who will
be taking up residency at the
Art Fair in a booth on the cor-
ner of Huron and Main.
The video show, sponsored by
the Independent Cinema/Video
Series, a coalition formed by
the three film co-ops, will run
Wednesday through Saturday,
from noon to 10 p.m.
Works include documentaries,
abstract and experimental tapes
and a multiple monitor piece by,
among others, Peter Bird, Rich-
ard Mandeberg and Rick Fran-
kel. Persons wishing to exhibit
their work should call the LSA
Media Center at 763-4048 for
further information.
Also scheduled for the fair
is a series of performances by
local jazz groups, who will be
appearing at different times and
locations throughout the four-day
event.
THE HEADLINING EVENT
of the Art Fair jazz jam will

be the appearance of Sun Ra
and his Solar Arkestra, long-
time Ann Arbor favorites who
offer a wide variety of creative,
progressive jazz and spacey ef-
fects and theatrics. Sun Ra will
perform twice this Friday at
the Michigan Union Ballroom,
at 8:30 and 10:30. The $3.50 gen-
eral admission ttickets , are on
sale.
Among the local groups pro-
viding free jazz during the fair
are combos offering music from
the 30's and 40's, be-bop, and
contemporary jazz, including 251
Orchestra, Beth Lindberg Quin-
tet, Melodioso, All Directions,
Ed Sugar and Friends, Vantage
Point Madcat Ruth and Friends,
No Dice and the Afghanistan
Bananastand Band.
Music will be performed at
the following locations and
times:
Main St..near Huron
Wed., Thurs. 2:00-9:30 p.m.
Saturday 2:00-5:30 p.m.

Apollo Music
Main St. near William
Wed., Thurs. 2:00-9:30 p.m.
Fri., Sat. 2-5:30 p.m.
Schoolkid's Records
(Liberty at Thompson)
Friday 2:00-5:30 p.m.
Music from the Apollo stage
will be simulcast over WCBN,
89.5, Wednesday through Sat-
urday. #
PIN BALL
AT
The Un ion
20 MACHINES
Union Lanes
OPEN 7 DAYS

th ru
Classified

A NIGHT OF
LOCAL WOMEN'S MUSIC
FRIDAY, JULY 22
-8:30 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
Local women musicians will be perform-
ing. Time will be, provided for informal
playing and jamming, so bring your in-
struments. Admission is free. I
SPONSORED BY
WOMEN'S PROGRAM COORDINATOR OFFICE

.r .~~~~wwnqq*WAe~N W
SPECIALS,
"I* *
1ESDAY JULY 19 e.
HEAD ,~
LADIES' NIGHT
WEDNESDAYHJULY 20,
. -;SHOTGUN
STUDENT NIGHT
THURSDAY JULY 21
SHOTGUN
GREEKS & DORMS
*.j FRIDAY-SUNDAY JULY 22-24 6
McCAFFREY
SUNDAY: Pitchers & Hospitality
' MONDAY JULY 25 "
MUGSBY & MERLIN
TEQUILA NIGHT
T e-q <<i q * * qe * e
61V

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