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July 12, 1977 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-12

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Tuesday, July 12, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Tuesday, July 12, 1977 [HE MICHI(~AN DAILY Page Five

Gaudied Gotham

By DAVID KEEPS
NEW YORK'S ZIEGFIELD THEATRE,
one of the classiest links in the Walter
Reade movie chain, houses a display of its
namesake's flossy, bygone glories-oddments
of a more lavish day in threate, but cur-
iously appropriate when, in mid June, it
served as the backdrop for the exclusive,
world-premiere, sneak preview of Scorcese's
New York, New York.
For both the theatre and the "event" it
housed, at a shameless $4.50 a throw, mer-
cilessly pointed out the fact that cinematic
subtlety and sophistication have long since
died, replaced by an almost cannibalistic
desire to wallow in long-lost glamour and
nostalgia as a form of entertainment.
Of late, this tactic has proved to be a
financial godsend, with droves of filmgoers
flocking to see such epics of non-originality
as the third remake of A Star Is Born, and
the quintessentially 40s fight film, souped-
up for the seventies as Rocky.
The latest, and arguably most critically
acclaimed, contributor to the celluloid slag
heap, is Martin Scorcese, who earlier tri-
umphed with the brilliant Taxi Driver, star-
ring Robert De Niro.
NEW YORK, NEW YORK, also stars De
Niro in a thankless role that seemed to
have been written with the express idea that
the pretentious and fabricated jive, wiseass

jazzman that he portrays should grow on
one like a bad rash.
De Niro, ever capable of fascinating emo-
tional range-finding, fails in his outsized
attempts to bring his character in the
realm of Scorcese's pretentious panache of
the 40's. And only his expansive garrulous-
ness can sustain his characterization, which
is strained at best.
What passes for the plot in this insipid
melodramtic musical is, ostensibly, the fa-
miliar boy-meets-girl story, that better and
more versatile performers including Gene
Kelly, Judy Garland, Alice Faye, and even
Barbra Streisand have turned into passable
entertainment.
NO SUCH LUCK with the peculiar pairing
of De Niro and Liza Minnelli, whose love-
hate relationship in the film is so boring,
inconsequential and aggravating to watch
that it fully resembles real life .in a way
that has never been captured on the screen.
All in a day's work for Scorcese, who is
able to evoke these qualities effectively and
chillingly. But when placed against the
gaudy sets and lurid technicolor backdrops;
not to mention the inane chatter of the two
principals, his achievements in New York,
New York waffle between unamusing, in-
artistic pastiche and Warholian absurdity
in the 40s costume.
To match the story's tepidity, the musical

Sandor
Scores
By GERARD PAPE
GYORGY SANDOR is a su-
perb pianist, one who combines
passion and precision in his
playing.
Sandor, who played Rackham
Auditorium last Thursday, is
head of the U-M piano perform-
ance doctoral program. His pro-
gram incltdid Bach's Organ
Choral Prelude in G minor and
Tocata and Fugtie in D Minor,
as well as Schuniann's Fantasy
in C major.
The concert opener, the Or-
gan Choral Prelude, featured
Sandor playing this baroque
piece with warmth, giving it an
almost Romantic fervor. Bach's
Tocata and Fugue were played
in precise fashion with each
contrapuntal line clearly. de-
lineated. Sandor's transcription
of this organ work made for a
pianistically satisfying and emo-
tionally involving experience,
all through this extremely fast
piece, his amazing virtuosity
was evident.
S C H U M A N N ' S Fan-
tasy in C was played by San-
dor with wild contrast, schizo-
phrenic mood changes, and tor-
See U-M, Page 6

sequences, extended beyond average toler-
ance in Minnelli's case, remain largely un-
distinguished (the screeching sax, though
excellent, was dubbed), excepting Laszlo
Kovac's sterling cinematography. The high-
lights, actually, were stolen by Mary Kay
Place's (Loretta H a g g e r s, remember?)
comic and touching portrayal of an off-key
kewpie doll, and Diane Abbott's sultry num-
her in a Harlem club, both of which come
too late and don't last long enough.
Offstage, the two lovers continue unabash-
edly to write their biggest hit, entitled-you
guessed it-"New York, New York" the big
finale everyone's been waiting for, which
comes and goes like the entire film without
lodging owe familiar note in the memory.

M7 be e

By NINA SHISHKOFF
"SHIELDS AND YARNELL,"
the commercials pro-
claim, is "the bright new sum-
mer smash!"
The words "bright new sum-
mer smash", when applied to
a summer replacement series,
always puzzles me. Just who
came up with that rave-up, par-
ticularly when the commercials
appeared before the show's
premiere?
Robert Shields and Lorene
Yarnell are a young mime cou-
ple who resemble a married
Donny and Marie Osmund, and,
more than that, resemble each
other. They were formerly
street performers in California
and frequent Johnny Carson
guests until they were "dis-
covered" and given their own
series on CBS' Monday night
line-up, occupying the 8:30
slot.
The show consists of singing,
dancing, comedy, and mime,
but its most important ingredi-
ent seems to be "cute". From
their toes to the top of their
page-boy bobs, Shields and
Yarnell personify cuteness. At

the start of each show, they
come out for the traditional op-
ening monologue that aptly dis-
plays their happy - married-
ness.
At the end, they snuggle up
in bed with a Teddy bear. In
their first show, Shields sang
a love song, and wife Yarnell,
heaven help us, cried with joy.
Shields is a singer of the John
Davidson School; meaning his
voice is operable, but no more.
Yarnell is a fairly talented, or,
at least, energetic dancer.
As for the comedy, Shields
See TV, Page 6
BILLIARDS
and
BOWLING
at Reduced
Rates Weds
11 a.m -6 p.m
alt the UNION

HOUSING DIVISION
FOR 1977-78 ACADEMIC YEAR
POSSIBLE POSITION OPENING FOR A GRADUATE STUDENT
TEACHING ASSISTANT IN THE PILOT PROGRAM ALICE LLOYD HALL
The Pilot Program, an innovative li, inq-learninq center for freshpersons and sophomores,
sponsored iointly by LS&A and Housing may have a Graduate Student Teaching Assistant
position open. Graduate Student Teachinq Assistants teach courses of their own design and
have corridor counseling duties. The courses should be within the liberal arts traditions and
have contemporary social, political, cultural or ethical implications. Graduate Student Teach-
inq Assistants must be skilled writers and be prepared, whatever their maior, to assist students
with writing problems. Remuneration consists of a .25 Graduate Student Teachina Assistant
(approximately $2200 per year), plus a sinale room and board.
Staff application forms are available starting July 12, 1977 in Charlene Coadvs office,
1500 SAB.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 4:00 P.M., JULY 19, 1977
A NON-DISCRIMINATORY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
310 MAYNARD
HAPPY
HOU RS
T d12 price on beer
g gg Tuesday g
%-/ price on a
drinks 7-10 P.M.
Fiay-15c hot dogs
S 2-5 P.M. Yo,
NO COVER
3M A-
31 oMAYNARD

CANTERBURY HOUSE SEEKS RESIDENTS
Three students or other qualified people are
being sought to live in Canterbury House begin-
ning in September and to support its programs
of ethical and spiritual inquiry and expression.
Free housing will be provided and residents will
have five hours of specific duties each week. We
are looking for people who want to live cooper-
ateively and whose personal concerns and life-
style will enhance the activities of Canterbury.
Those interested should contact Jonathan Ellis
by July 18, 1977 at 665-0606 or 995-5859.

w

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