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July 12, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-12

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Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, July 12, 1977
Udall, 2 others admit getting legal
campaign donations from Korean

WASHINGTON (A) - Three
senior House members have
acknowledged receiving cam-
paign contributions from Ko-
rean rice dealer Tongsun
Park, the man who is at the
center of a probe into an al-
leged influence-buying scheme.
Rep. Morris Udall, (D-Ariz.);
said today that a check of his
files shows Park contributed
$300 to his 1970 congressional
campaign.
H 0 U S E AGRICULTURE
Committee Chairman Thomas
Foley, (D-Wash.), said he ac-
cepted a $500 campaign contri-
bution from Park in 1970 and
later rejected two requests from
Park for favors.
House Armed Services Chair-
man Melvin Price, (D-Ill.),
learned from Justice Depart-
ment investigators that he also

accepted $500 from .Park in
1970 and later wrote a congrat-
ulatory letter praising the rice
dealer to South Korean Presi-
dent Park Chung Hee, a Price
aide said.
The aide said Park visited
Price from time to time in his
congressional office, but added
that Price has no recollection
of either the contribution or the
letter.
A NUMBER of other congress-
persons earlier admitted receiv-
ing contributions from Park.
Udall said it now seems evi-
dent that he was among con-
gresspersons Park targeted
"for special attention in an at-
tempt to influence decisions re-
garding military aid" for South

ing to get into the Washington
social whirl and in 1970 "the
contribution by Mr. Park was
legitimate."
"IF THERE was any hope of
having that contribution influ-
ence my attitude, it failed mis-
erably," he added.
Udall said during the 1976
Democratic presidential pri-
mary "I was -the first and
most vocal Democratic candi-
date to urge withdrawal of
troops and reduction of aid to
South Korea as long as the
present regime persisted in its
repressive ways." T
Foley said he accepted $500
as a legal campaign contribu-
tion and later turned down two
requests from Park for favors.
FOLEY SAID one request,
which he said came indirectly

from Park, was to put favor-
able information in the Con-
gressional Record about South
Korean President Park Chung
Hee's 1972 revision of his na-
tion's constitution.
Foley said he refused the de-
mand. He also said he refused
a request from- Park to write
a letter to the Korean presi-
dent praising the rice dealer.
"Of course if I had had any
indication at the time he vas
connected with the Korean gov-
ernment, I would not have ac-
cepted the contribution," Foley
said.
BILL HART, Price's admin-
istrative aide, said he believes
the congressman probably con-
sidered his letter to President
Park a routine congratulatory
letter.
Hart said Price does not re-
call signing the letter or re-

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