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May 22, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-05-22

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, Mov 22, 1970

I

Venceremos Brigade speaker
tells about Cuban experience

'UNDERCOVER CAMPAIGN':

CBS accuses White House of
attempting to discredit media

By BERNARD WELTON
"Before the revolution, there
was definite racism. The U.S. had
brought everything that wa s
American, including racism. It was
a package deal." So spoke Jac-
queline Rice concerning Afro-
Cuban racism in a speech to about
50 people in the Union last night.
Miss Rice, black Socialist Work-
er Party candidate for Congress
in the First Congressional District
in Detroit, directed her attention
to relating her experience as part
of the second Venceremos brigade

which harvested sugar cane in In raising the level of national'
Cuba. awareness, the Cuban government
In a dynamic representation, maintains that the "number one
Miss Rice did not paint an entire- educational subject is the Cuban,
ly rosy picture of a post-revolu- Revolution," according to Missa
tionary state. She admitted that Rice.i
Cuba still has vestiges of racism The educational system is sim-t
and male chauvinism (machismo) i ilar to that in the U.S., with the
still exist. "Cuba is still a back- addition of a "parallel system"
ward agricultural state," she said.- where workers can attend schoolx
The Cuban government is strug- and still receive their pay for the
gling to overcome problems of time they spend in school, she
women's liberation, racism and said.
economic poverty with a "massive In t bm
re-education program," Miss Rice i.tted an tillitgernmnam
said.sins an ant eracy cam-
.__ paign over the entire country, sheI

NEW YORK /Pi - CBS News?
accused the White House yester-
day of an "undercover campaign1
to discredit" a television story of
a combat assault in which a North
Vietnamese prisoner was shown
being stabbed while lying on the1
ground.
Commentator Walter Conkite
said the attempt to discredit Co-
lumbia Broadcasting System Newsj
included an allegation that "the
story was faked."
CBS correspondent Don Web-.
ster then produced a South Viet-
namese sergeant w h o - inter-
viewed through an interpreter -
said he stabbed the fallen North
Vietnamese "because the enemy
was reaching for a rifle."
The sergeant was identified on

suspicions about the authenticity "We broadcast the original story
of the report." in the belief it told something
"Clark Mollenhoff, special coun- about the nature of the war in
sel to the President," Cronkite! Vietnam. What has happened
went on, "confirms that he has in- since then tells something about
vestigated the CBS Vietnam story the government and its relations
but refuses to say who ordered the with ne medi which carry-I
investigation. He acknowledges he w ews meia wi arr
talked to several reporters and stories the government finds dis-
columnists." agreeable."
- -4 "

Friesids of the Ann Arhor Publie Library
HOOK FAIIR
SATURDAY, MAY 23
8:30 A.M.-4:00 P.M.
Ann Arbor Public.Librar
5th Ave. at William
Thousands of books on porch and children's
books in basement at 50c each. Also records,
picture frames and white elephants.
All unsold books will be on sale in the basement
Monday, May 25th at IOc each.

4

C c
Committee calls for
e nviromenta school
(Continued from Page 1) of, the School of Natural Resourc-f
on finding solutions to our envir- es at their May meeting last weeki
onmental problems. McFadden's appointment fol-
The committee recommends that lows a search by a faculty-student
the University m a k e a definite advisory committee, named by
commitment to establishing the President Robben Fleming to help1
environmenta college without de- identify qualified persons to head.
lay, with a goal of enrolling the the school.l
first class in the school year 1971-
72. He succeeds P r o f. Stephen
In a related development, the Preston, acting dean of the schooli
Regents approved the appoint- since the resignation of D e a n
ment of James McFadden as Dean Keith Arnold last July.
McFadden, 39, has b e e n thei
chairman of the Department of
State Senate Wildlife and Fisheries and will as--
sume his duties as Dean on July 1.

said. "They took everyone out of
school and opened up educational'
centers in the mountains for pea-,
sants, workers, and students. For
one year they launched an inten-
sive program aimed at teaching
everyone how to read and write."
Miss Rice said that as a result,

of this campaign, everyone in the program as Nguyen Van Mot.1
Cuba now is literate, and is theIand he was quoted as saying he
number one country in Latinkilled the prisoner in self-defense,
America for literacy. drawing a knife from the prison-E
The speech was followed by a er's body after an initial thrust
question-and-answer period. The and plunging the weapon in a sec-
questions centered around the in- ond time.
dividual liberties within Cuba. "The Pentagon may wish to be-
Miss Rice's replies stressed the lieve this story never happened,"
single-minded orientation of Cu- Webster added, "but it did."
bans towards the revolution. "For reasons not entirely clear,"
When she responded to a ques- Cronkite said. "the White Houser
tion about marijuana by saying has engaged in an undercover
that enforcement is strict, the campaign to discredit CBS News
meeting ended amidst laughter by alleging the story was faked."y
when the questioner wondered al- He said reporters and column-
oud, "It grows there, and they ists have been prompted "to pub-
,just leave it alone?" lish White House and Pentagon
OBSERVATORY STREET

Iati onal uardsmen=-.-_-...,,_
called to Ohio State the min
(Continued from Page 1) made more progress than at any , 1965 SUPER HAWK. $300, well talen
Some windows were broken in time in 10 years. care of miles. Will sell to highest
the university Union building and The council recommended, and offer by Nov. 1. Andy--781-$930. 72
in the Law Building, both along officials agreed, that .disciplinary
High Street. action against students arrested
Demonstrators retreated a block in recent disturbances be suspend- -
ed pnigteotcm fcut a n m a t p r'U w
or more ahead of law officers, ,pending the outcome of court X* O
disappeared into crowds of spec- proceedings in the cases.
tators and left the campus rela- In the demonstration, students
tively quiet. blocked entrances to several uni-
versity buildings. One group of 20
The demonstration started on to 30 blacks waded and swam in M ich el!!
the campus with some 4,000 stu- Mirror Lake, a campus landmark. (1s here)
dents at a noon rally. Militanth 2 Homecomings are always better than
speakers calling for a renewal of dUniversity authorities this week one! I love you! lap FF
a strike were booed. directed administrative officers to -
conduct continuous negotiation
University football coach Woody with student leaders over a lista
Hays got a mixed reception at the of 28 demands presented last Read and Use DAILY Classifieds
rally where. he said recent meet- month,
ings of the faculty council has These dealt with numbers of
black students, courses, grading
systems and what was termed a
lack- of communication between SHOWS TODAY AT
students, faculty and the admin- 1:00-3:40-6:25-9:05

A4

askspgn ban
(Continued from Page 1)
bearing dangerous weapons on
University property.
Both clauses, in effect, make
expulsion for these acts compul-
sory.
Actions falling under jurisdic-
tion of the campus disorder pro-;
vision include remaining on cam-
pus buildings or on campus when
requested to leave and participat-
ing in any action which leads to
a disturbance of normal activities
or involves property destruction or
personal injury.
University officials speculated
Wednesday that if the $73.2 mil-
lion figure-$2.5 million less than
Gov. William Milliken had recoin-
mended was adopted bythe
Legislature, the University may be"
in for another tuition hike for
1970-71.
The Regents approved a 15 per
cent tuition hike in April, warning
at that time that if the size of the;
state appropriation turned out to
be substantially lower than the
amount recommended by Milliken,
the tuition might be raised still!
higher.
Another provision included in!
the appropriation bill requests a
new system for regulating and
equalizing tuition levels at the
various state universities, colleges
and jr. colleges.
This provision, will institute a
structured tuition system which
would require the same tuition
payments from all in-state Uni-
versity students regardless of their
program or year, for the 1971-72
academic year.
The bill's recommended level for'
the University proposes that in-
,state students pay $21 per semes-
ter credit hour, or $651 per aca-
demic year. Presently, in-state stu-
dents pay $568 per academic year.
Out-state students would still$
pay 75 per cent of their educa-
tional costs as presently required.I
The new system, which would:
require the same tuition payments
from medical students as from un-
dergraduates, was proposed in an'
effort to equalize the tuition
charges throughout the state's
higher education institutions.
The structured tuition level pro-
posal would not go into effect un-
til the 1971-72 academic year in
order to allow University officials
and other state educational offi-
cials to discuss and make recom-
mendations on the plan..
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Cit Cuncil1 to vote on extension,
(Continued from Page 1) The extension is not expected to would see an increase in traffic ; alternative would make an alrbady
effectively destroyed by blocking! affect the relatively light traffic volume for several reasons. In dangerous pedestrian crossing at
access to it with high volume flow on S. University, he added. addition to serving the hospital Washtenaw and Hill worse and
traffic," it adds. . Both Forest and Observatory are area, the connection would serve would require widening Hill be-
SGC presented to City Council presently wide enough to handle as a link in a planned "traffic tween Washtenaw and Forest. He I
last February a resolution oppos- the expected t r a f f i c volumes, ring" to facilitate flow around the added that given future predic-
ing the planned extension. While though Hill St. is slated to be central campus. The so called tions of traffic pressure on the
the present SGC has taken no widened to three lanes, Carlson "traffic ring" includes Hill St., area it was the "best of alterna-
official action on the matter, SGC said. Packard St., S. Division St., Hu- tives" available and that he would
member Bruce Wilson and Presi- The extension of Observatory as ron and the four lane section of! support the resolution if council
dent Marty Scott will meet with far as Washtenaw says Director Forest and Washtenaw. would agree to several conditions.
city officials today to discuss the of University Business Operations The proposed extension connect-' The conditions, Harris said,
proposed extension. James Brinkerhoff is supported by ing Washtenaw with Forest would were that council would agree to
Wilson, who spoke for SGC
against thehproposal at City the University to facilitate access direct traffic circulating around fund a comprehensive study that
Council last February, said it is .tothe hospital, adding that the the campus down Forest to Hill, would consider specific plans for
"fantastic that it could even be University has no involvement rather than requiring drivers to the future including problems con-
considered seriously, with the extension through to negotiate the difficult right-hand cerning pedestrians, mass transit,
Marvin Carlson,ya planner in Washtenaw. He said he expected turn at Washtenaw and Hill. parking facilities, and the rela-
the department, said that the no increase in the "fixed volume Prochaska and Carlson have tionship between the University
streets that would see significant of traffic to the hospital area and supported an alternative plan that and the city. In addition, he would
increases in traffic volume would predicted an eventual reduction would stop the Observatory exten-I ask council to postpone approval
be Observatory, Hill and Forest when a proposed widening of sion at Washtenaw and improve1 of additional parking structures
Ave. between S. University and Fuller Road to provide improved the right hand turn capability at until the study was completed and
Hill. Observatory, he said, would access to the hospital is completed Washtenaw and Hill to direct traf- the residents of Burns Park area
be subject to "major travel by in 1972-73. fic flow down Hill while avoiding to be assured by council that heavy
relatively high speed and high' Harris, however, said that the Forest. traffic would not intrude orI
volume" traffic. Significant in- widening of Fuller Road could not Harris. however, said that the "bleed" into the neighborhood.
creases of traffic volume would be begin for seven to ten years.
seen on Forest, he said, which Observatory, Prochaska asserts, I
would serve to feed traffic com- will eventually see an increase in
ing from Observatory and the traffic as it absorbs excess volume
hospital area onto Hill St. Hill St. predicted by traffic studies for
would serve as a "major thorough- Forest and Huron.
fare" for east-west traffic be- The extension of Observatory
tween Washtenaw and Packard. to Forest. Prochaska explains,
May 22, 23-Fri., Sat.
PPTH FOrUM
PtPTM K AVENUE AT LIBERTY AO 4LL ABOUT EVE
'till OWNTCWNN ANN ARBOR
i, INFORMIATION ?6't^4?00
FRI.- 7;5, 9:00, 10:45 dir. JOSEPH MANKIEWICZ
SAT.-2:30, 4:00, 5:30,
7:15, 9:00, 10:45 BETTE DAVIS, GEORGE SANDERS, ANN
"Allen Funt is concerned BAXTER starring in this Academy Award
with human reactions to
n.nudity. We're all voeurs
and it is amusing to see theWflll9fm
reactions."
---Judith Crist BETTE DAVIS HAS HER BEST
"ALL THE THINGS YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO COMIC DIALOGUE.
SEE ON CANDID CAMERA BUT COULDN'T"
REX. REED 7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
"I FOUND THE AUDIENCE REACTING WITH DE ) 662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM
LIGHT AND OUTRIGHT BELLY LAUGHS"_
--WCBS
x a RNow Showing
SHOWS
a T ET AT:

istration. 1 /Ir -u II IM ! I In I V*E ATtOF 1ASMIlA1T D IATF

' t
a A3

f ir pal I." R wL i

--PRICE LISTED BELOW-'

"You will enjoy 'AIRPORT' immensely,
and you will find yourself talking about it
enthusiastically to your friends." -Denver Post
ATHER NOVEL
OF THE YEAR -^".
MOTION
PICTURE! y
BURT LANCASTER C AN MARTIN

I9

I

I

THE
COUNTRY SOUL
Of
Steve Edmunds
Mike Smith
and
Steve Newhouse
on
i
PealStig uia

A ROSS UNT I
BURT LANCASTER DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG JACQUELINE BISSET
GEORGE KENNEDY HELEN HAYES
VAN HEFLIN MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRYNELSON LLOYD NOLAN

I

JEAN SEBERG JACQUELINE BISSET

GEORGE KENNEDY

HELEN HAYES

MUSIC COMPOED & b)COUCT!E GBY IBCM ITHE N041 By WRITTEN TOR 1THE SCREEN& #IMEMOC By PROf.DBy
At.F REUNEWMAN "ART HUR HiAit EY 'GEORGE SEATON ' ROSS HUNTER
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE T1CHNICOIOR' Produced >n TODDOAO' r-IAll AGE* ADIMTIB
-.--- e".'.'Ad-,e',(,.
Sound Track Album ext-,,s 'e y o, OECCA RECOROS
also ava table on 8-Track4and Cassette Tape'

MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY EVENINGS ...
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS . .
ALL DAY SUNDAY ........
MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY MATINEE ... .
Pass List Suspended This Attraction

$2.25
$2.50
. . . $2.25
$1.75

'4

"A NEW
CLS
MOMENT IN
AMERICAN r
MOVIES ...
as a film it
has something
to say to
everyone.
A stunning
impact, the
most evocative
descriptions of
American life.
I have ever
seen.
-Roger Ebert,
Chicago-Sun Times
"SHARP...
REWARDING
... attacks the
hypocrisy of
.. rw l-J ~ MA

;'
!sf,

A-

The Daily Official Bulletin is an of-j
fictal publication of the University of
Michigan. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3328
L.S.A. Bldg., before 2 p.m. of the day
preceeding publication and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday. Items
appear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for pub-
lication. For more information, phone
764-9279.
Day Calendar
Friday, May 22
Baseball: U-M vs. Illinois (double-
header): Ferry Field, 1:00 p.n'.
Placement Service
General Division
3200 S.A.B.
Interview at General Division, call
763-1363 for appoinaments: Thursday,
May 28:
Teaher Carp nrogram of training!

~IJAIE AT
7-9

"Positively Brilliant"
A NEW CLASSIC

who's that

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