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May 21, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-05-21

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, May 21, 11970

New York construction workers THREE 'FREE' YEARS
lead massive pro.Nixon march U' to give special study grants

I-

NEW YORK (A' - Steel-hel-
meted construction workers led a
throng estimated by a police
source at 150,000 persons in a City
Hall rally yesterday in support of
the Nixon administration's Indo-
china war policy.
It was by far the largest pro-
administration turnout in the
several yaars since masses have
begun taking to the city streets
to demonstrate for and against
Vietnam. Yesterday's march ap-
peared to exceed even a 1967 out-
pouring of antiwar marchers, es-
timated by police at the time to
number 125,000.
Heavily policed, shepherded by
union marshals, exhortad by their!
leaders to keep their cool, the
marchers beneath American flags
made their way through down-
town Manhattan without violence.
Besides the hardhats, the ranks
included longshoremen and office,
workers.
When trouble occasionally
seemed to threaten, police moved
in quickly. There were 3,800 of
them assigned.
The lack of violence was in
contrast to a May 8 rally, when
construction workers attacked,
beat and injured 70 antiwar dem-
onstrators and long-haired youths
in the same area.
In Buffalo, N.Y., meanwhile, as
estimated 1,500 construction work-
ers from that area staged a noon
rally with signs proclaiming "sup-
port the President," and "Amer-
ica, Love it or Leave it."'

By ROB BIER
What would you do if some-
one came up to you and said,
"Take three years off and do
whatever you like. We'll pay
your way?" Sound fantastic?
Well, in a short time, it will be
coming true for a small number
of University students as part
of a program called the Michi-
gan Society of Fellows.
With the help of a $2 million
terminal grant from the Ford
Foundation, the Society will un-
derwrite 18 to 30 junior fellows
who will be free to pursue their
own interests for three years.
Only two strings are attached.
The junior fellows must meet
with the senior fellows, mostly
distinguished professors, once
a week for an informal dinner.
This ties them to the University
community. Beyond that, no re-
strictions are made.
The junior fellows will no: be
required to pursue any course
of study and, in fact, may not
be allowed to take any courses
for credit, according to Stephen
Spurr, vice president and dean
of the graduate school.
The plan is modeled after the
Harvard Society of F e 11o w s
which was established in 1933
and has since produced two
Nobel and five Pulitzer prize-
winners, in addition to a long
------:-----

list of respected scholars and
public leaders.
One former Harvard fel.xv is
Donald Hall, now a professor of
English at the University. Thf
program allowed him to stop
work toward becoming an Eng-
lish professor and to spend three
years writing poetry, Spurr said.
"Since I became a graduate
dean, I've been very concerned
with developing interdisciplin-
ary programs," Spurr said. He
believes that the Michigan fel-
low will be able, if he chooses,
to explore areas of interest to
him which lie outside his field
of formal study, as well as gain
different perspectives from the
senior fellows.
Spurr said he studied the Har-
vard plan, drew up a proposal
for the Ford Foundation and tne
money was granted. However,
there is a stipulation that the
University must seek matching
funds, some of which are al-
ready being made available by
the various schools and colleges.
Support will be sought from
other sources as well, Spurr said,
but "no type of financial sup-
port will be acceptable which
limits the freedom of the junior
fellow."
In his first year, a junior fel-
low would receive up 'o a $7,000
stipend, plus a $500 dependency
allowance for up to three de-

pendents, with the stipend in-
creasing by $500 each subse-
quent year.
Spurr said he hopes to have
two to four junior fellows in the
program next year. Students
will be chosen by the group of
senior fellows initially. with jun-
ior fellows joining in the deci-
sion as they enter the program.
In a letter to the deans, de-
partment chairmen and program
chairmen, Spurr said tne society
was looking for "individuals
without regard to race, -ex, or
nationality who are amonng the
most promising of all students
that you have ever known and
who show most unusual uromis e"
either in a special field, or
"scholarship in the broadest
sense."
At present, the organizing
group of senior fellows consists
of seven people with three to
five additional members to be
chosen. They are: President
Robben Fleming, who is a pro-
fessor of law; Vice President for
Academic Affairs Allan Smith,
also a professor of law; .T dner
Ackley, former chairman of the
President'sCouncil of Econo-
mic Advisors and an econoiemcs
professor; Otto Graff, professor
of German and chairman of the
literary college's honors pro-
gram; Donald Hall, professor of
English; and Dr. James Noel,
professor of human genetics.

FOR THE BENEFIT OF WITH HOUSING
2 Plays in verse
"The Old Man" and "The Lady & God"
by KENNETH GAERTNER
CANTERBURY HOUSE, 330 Maynard
May 22 & 23--8:;30 P.M.
ADMISSION $2.00
Tickets Aailable of the Door
For-Re-ervations Phone 665-0374

1

I

T A T.ga E

Now Showing
SHOWS
AT:
1=3-5
7-9 P.M.

MEET MA BARKER WHO TOOK
HER BIBLE, HER HYMN BOOK AND
HER TOMMY GUN AND RAISED
FOUR SONS AND MORE HELL
THAN MOST OF THE MOBS
IN CHICAGO.

A

-Associated Press
CONSTRUCTION WORKERS, longshoremen and office employes
wave American flags yesterday as they jammed the City Hall area

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in New York City in a rally supporting President Nixon's war One person was pummeled be-
policy. fore being rescued by police, whoE
said he had shouted "warmong-
ers" at demonstrators.
! C TThe Naw York march cloggedj
S e fl: G ifin scores Broadway for nearly a mile, along
the traditional ticker tape route
of heroes between the Battery andI
d' ~54 - -geCity Hall.
Showers of ticker tape greeted
the paraders as they marched!
WASHINGTON (A'--The Senate's number two Republican south,
leader, Robert P. Griffin of Michigan, said yesterday that On the steel skeleton of a new
building, construction workers who
senators supporting a proposal to restrict U.S. actions in had stayed on the job waved
Cambodia are giving "aid and comfort to the enemy." American flags from on high andl
Griffin lashed out at 1 e a d e r s of the Cooper-Church beat with their hammers on gird-
amendment after a conciliatory exchange between Demo- ers and pipes.
cratic Leader Mike Mansfield and Republican Leader Hugh Held aloft in the crowd were
Scott. signs reading, "Iritpeach the Red
Mayor." An effigy of Mayor John
Meanwhile, behind-the-scenes negotiations continued in V. Lindsay was hanged and then'
efforts to head off a confrontation between the Senate and burned.
the White House that could The mayor, an opponent pf Nix-
prolong the p r e s e n t debate on's Southeast Asia policy, was
critical of police after the May 8
Paniel aslS until the June 30 date set by melee. Lindsay ordered an investi-
President N i x o n for with- gation into reports that officers
drawal of U.S. troops from stood by while antiwar demon-
strators were beaten.
budgtCambodia.On lower Broadway, a youth
Scott told the Senate that "itd
Continued from Page 1) is my personal opinion that we perched atop a building clock gave
per cent by the 1973-74 academic will be out of Cambodia before ers The demonstrators booed,
year; the 1st of July . . . because the hurled beer cans and bottles at
-An increase of 200 in the en- operation is a tactical success." the young man and tried to charge
rollment at the University's Flint . Griffin's attack was directed at police barricades in his direction.
College: the Cooper - Church amendment A policeman made a human fly
-Inflation on non-salary items ascent up the side of the building
estimated at $966,000; and as it is now worded and at its at the side to the bun
-Increased expenditures for fire sponsors, Sens. John Sherman inside.
protection and use of police. Cooper (R-Ky., Frank Church Police Commissioner Howard R.j
The recommendation of the (D-Idaho), Mansfield and George Leary said that of 3,800 police of-
Senate Appropriations Committee D A'k RVt) ficers assigned to the demonstra-
now moves to the floor, where de- ien -.tion 2,700 were on overtime at a
bate on provisions in the entire Mansfield replied that U.S. cost'f$,,00.eo ieathi
cotof $180,000. Police said this
state budget is expected to last for troop strength in Southeast Asia was not a record number of of-
a few weeks. has gone up 1,200 in recent weeks ficers used for a demonstration in
Although the House of Repre- and said "the President tied his the city.
sentatives has begun to hold pre- own hands" by saying U.S. troops
liminary budget hearings, no ac- -ownhands"_bysayingU.S.troops
tion will be taken until the appro- would penetrate Cambodia only 21
priations bills pass the Senate. miles and would be out by July 1.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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"A NEW
CLASSIC
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AMERICAN
MOVIES...
as a film it
has something
to say to
everyone.
A stunning
impact, the
most evocative
descriptions of
American life
I have ever
seen."
-Roger Ebert,
Chicago-Sun Times
"SHARP...
REWARDING
..atacks the
hypocrisy of
a religion bused
double standard:'
--Clifford Terry,
Chicago Tribune

<I

A~

A

Gay Liberation
Front
MEETING!
THURSDAY, MAY 21
8:30 P.M. 3rd Floor Union
(consider the possibilities)

May 22, 23-Fri., Sat.
ALL ABOUT EVE
dir. JOSEPH MANKIEWICZ
BETTE DAVIS, GEORGE SANDERS, ANN
BAXTER starring in this Academy Award
winning film.
BETTE DAVIS HAS HER BEST
COMIC DIALOGUE.
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 7cAUDITORIUM

"Positively Brillianti"
A NEW CLASSIC
who's that
KNOCKING
at any door

1

introducing HARVEY KEITEL
starring ZINA BETHUNEQ °sTHE
distributed by Joseph Brenner Associates

NICE GIRL, BUT...

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AT
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SAT. & SUN.
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U

64

The date of our GROOVEY
dance is to be announced soon

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AND PRICES

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"Hlorious nonsense from Allen Funt: A swell X
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