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May 19, 1970 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1970-05-19

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, May 19, 1970

d-.,

Several universities
close to memorialize
slayings in Jackson

NEW PROGRAM:
Model cities is

. . .

...roller skating?

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A NATIONAL «I NFRAL COMPANY
FOx V1LLa'6E
375 No'. MAPLE RD."769.I30O?
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An Ingo Preminger Production
Color by DE LUXE
PanavisionR

(Continued from Page 1)
low the federal government to in-
volve itself in campus unrest as
long as the college concerned
holds a defense contract. "The bill
would give unprecedented and al-
most unlimited power to the ex-
ecutive branch . . . at the expense
of the judicial branch and the in-
dividual," said Howe.
The Brandeis University strike
information center-a student-
run group at Waltham, Mass.-
said there was some strike activity
yesterday on 265 campuses. About
150 of these schools are among the
nation's 1,500 four-year colleges
and universities. The others in-
clude junior colleges and special-
ized institutions of higher educa-
tion. About a dozen schools re-
mained officially closed for the
reminder of the school year.
The protests were touched off
by President Nixon's sending U.S.
troops into Cambodia. They inten-
sified after four Kent State Uni-
versity students were fatally shot
et tie Ohio campus in a confron-
tation with National Guardsmen.
Further protests were touched off
by the killing of six blaks during
racial violence in Augusta, Ga. and
the Jackson slayings.
Knoxville College in Kgnoxville,
Tenn., - a predominantly black
school with 900 students, closed
until Thursday in sympathy for
the students slain at Jackson.
Directors of the University of
Cincinnati, which closed May 8
and was to be reopen yesterday
morning,'agreed to have the school
stay shut for the rest of the term
as a memorial to the students at
Jackson, There are 16,500 stu-
dents. '
Students from Howard Univer-
sity in Washington and Lincoln
University in Oxford, Pa., met with
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell in the
Blacks- plan,
protest walk
(Continued from Page 1)
Atlanta, march one mile to the
state Capitol and then to More-
house College for the mass rally.
SCLC said Perry was chosen as
the starting point of recent pro-
tests concerning school desegre-
gation disputes.
A ty. Gen. Mitchell, whose in-
vestigators are probing the shoot-
ing deaths of two Negroes by po-
lice at Jackson State College Fri-
day, visited the campus himself
yesterday and talked privately
with officials.
Shortly before his arrival, soie
500 school-age blacks converged
on downtown Jackson to march
quietly around the governor's
mansion to protest the slayings.
The marchers made five circuits
of the mansion but made no at-
tempt to see Gov. John Bell Wil-
liams.
Mitchell met for more than two
hours with Mayor Russell Davis
and Dr. John A. Peoples, president
of predominantly Negro Jackson
State.
"What they have told me will
be very helpful in the investigation
here and in similar incidents
which may occur in the future,"
he said.

nation's capital. Some of the stu-
dents proposed he establish a fed-
eral strike force to probe the Jack-
son and Augusta killings.
Both schools are predominantly
black.
Mitchell already has ordered a
Justice Department probe of both
incidents. He went to Jackson
Monday afternoon.
About 60 St. Louis members of
the Kent State University Alumni
Association sent letters to 11 area
colleges and universities asking
them to avoid violence.
Dave Meeker, one of the alunni,
said the group asked the schools
"to work for a restoration of rea-
son and pursuit of a meaningful
dialogue both on campus and in
the community."
Acting on a suggestion from
Bloomington, Ind., Mayor John.
Hooker Jr., students at the Uni-
versity of Indiana scheduled a
"keep the lines of communication
open" discussion program for 240
persons, including students, busi-
nessmen and civic leaders.
Students at the Univefsity of
Virginia in Charlottesville wound
up a two-day seminar seeking to
mobilize support of congressional
leaders and peace candidates
against the war. About 100 stu-
dents from 15 Virginia schools at-
tended.
Sixteen students at the Virginia
Polytechnic Institute in Blacks-
burg continued a bread and water
fast they began last week in an
attempt to get the school presi-
dent to rescind the suspension of
107 students who occupied a cam-
pus building.
In Washington, the Student
Mobilization .Committee to End
the War in Vietnam said antiwar
demonstrations were planned for
Memorial Day, May 30, in at least
eight U.S. cities.
Students at the University of
Maryland in College Park held a
rally, opening the program with
memorials to the victims of Kent
State, Augusta andI Jackson State.
Three university juniors, all
leaders of the Students for a Dem'-
ocratic Society, were arrested Sun-
day, charged with breaking and
entering in connection with the

W

-Associated Press
POLICE REMOVE a protesting student from the administration
building at Miami's Florida Memorial College. Police action in
' clearing the building lead to a 90-minute clash with students.
EMU quiet as co,,urt
lifts 4 usesin

By EDWARD ZIMMERMAN'
Eastern Michigan Universityy
spent a relatively quiet night last
night following the news that the
A1 suspended students had been;
reinstated.
A small group of about 75 stu-
dents marched around the campus1
to protest the war and the' killingI
of two students on the Jackson
State College campus last week.I
Last Saturday, thetEMU student
court ruled that the suspended
students were not notified proper-
ly and they recommended that
the suspensions be rescinded. EMU
President Harold Sponberg must
still decide whether or not to ac-
cept the student court's recom-,

sacking of the administration mendations.
building last Thursday. National The students w e r e suspended:
Guardsmen were called on to the because they had accrued more,
campus following the incident and severe violations than violation of
nine truckloads stood by as yes- curfew, which was by far the
terday's rally began, most a b u n d a n t misdemeanor
Livingston Hall, a four-story handed out during last week's dis-
building at Fisk University, a pre- turbances. Police arrested 171 per-
dominantly black school in Nash- sons in four days.
ville, Tenn., was destroyed by fire A meeting of Concerned Citi-
yesterday. Officials blamed the zens was scheduled for last night
blaze on arson. The student body in the Newman Catholic Center
president, Geraldine Jenkins, said, in Ypsilanti. The meeting was
"There have been factions of stu- postponed when the organizers of
dents and community persons who
are bent on destroying the univer-
sity rather than building it."
In Tallahassee, Florida A & M
University, a predominantly black Students!
school, suspended classes and per-
mitted students to attend work- * DISTINCTIVE COLLEGIATE
shop discussions. Classes are to HAIRSTYLING for Men
resume Tuesday. And Women-
Elijah McClendon, student news-
paper editor at Jackson State, told * 8 HAIRSTYLISTS
a news conference in New York T
that students had gathered "out The Dscl Br S
of curiosity" and were not dem-
onstrating when the youths were Arborland -Campus
slain at the school last week. Maple Village
"Police were there to kill people.
They were all ready to kill blacks,"
he said. "Students are not going
to be innocent victims and sitting
pigeons."
McClendon said many youths
may be armed when they return
to the campus next September.
THE ORIGINAL
SILENT CLASSIC
now complete with sound9
effects and the authentic
musical score'
Today's young audience will find
its mood varying from high
camp to tense silence as the plot
unfolds. But laughter at Victor-
ion romance and melodrama is
quickly snuffed out by chases,
rescues, battles, fights and sheer
narrative drive. And it's the
real thing! D. W. Griffith's .
original masterpiece as he con-
ceived and created it.

that meeting realized that the cen-
ter was also to be the meeting
place of the marching students.
Meanwhile, the action against
14th District Judge Henry Arki-
son on charges of imposing ex-
cessive bail and denying bail dur-
ing last week's disorders was post-
poned until later in the week.
Washteriaw Circuit Judge Ross
Campbell heard a motion to dis-
Smiss chargesagainst Arkison yes-
terday and gave the attorneys who
are filing the complaints against
him four days to reply.
The University ranks fifth in
the number of its students who
have served in the Peace Corps.
Peace Corps Director Joseph A.
Blatchford says that a total of 479
University students have been
Peace Corps volunteers. Of that
total, 159 are now serving over-
seas or are in training.
WEEKEND
May 22-24
Project Outreach-
Psych 483
Informotion, Applications
and Interviews
554 THOMPSON
764-9279
Interviews:
Tues., Wed.
May 19, 20
1 p.m-.5 p.m.

Continued from Page 1
scale spending in urban ghettos.
Roller skating is not a new
phenomenon in the city and has
always been very popular, skat-
ers point out. Some began their
skating careers two summers
ago at St. Thomas High School
or at Slauson last summer.
Through surveys and by "just
talking to the kids," Mrs. Berla
says, it wasn't hard to determine
that people would rather roller
skate than sit on a street cor-
ner or pester the local mer-
chants.
Roller skaters will receive an
added push late in June when
the city recreation department
takes over the program. A
spokesman from the recreation
department said that plans at
present are to make both Slau-
son and St. Thomas high school
open to roller-skaters seven days
a week, with younger skaters at
St. Thomas and teenagers at
Slauson
To generate money for inner-
city youths, the Mddel Cities of-
fice plans to work with City
Hall and various federal agen-
cies to locate and create jobs
this summer.
One of the few complaints cir-
culating around the make-shift
roller rink is that "this place is
too damn small." Skating to the
tune of James Brown or the Su-
premes, 70 or 80 kids fill all the
available floor space for the
time it takes to play three '45's.
"We need a place three or
four times as big," says one of
the floor guards, adding that a
larger rink would have "no
trouble" drawing 1,000 people
a night. Sitting on the floor,
fifth grader Daniel Harrison
said he thought it would be a
good idea for the city to "build
us a rink and also a school to
teach little kids how to skate,"
as well to "give us something to
sit on."
As far as lessons are concern-
ed, "its hard to teach people how
to skate, you just pick it up
after getting knocked around a
while," says one floor gaurd.
The skating program also
serves more pedestrian purposes.
Lacking the planned 'teen
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for only 79c! Larger take-home
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CSMIL9NG SPEEDY ERVICE
West of Arborland

center. "roller skating is where
everything happens, its the cen-
ter of activity in the commu-
nity," says 17-year-old skater
Dan Holton.
"Its supposed to keep us out
of trouble," adds Keith Miles,
a ninth grader at Forstythe Jr.
High and one of the better per-
formers in the gym. "That's why
they give us that bus, so we
can't get in trouble on the way
home." Asked if the plan to keep
people out of trouble by mount-
ing them on wheels was -work-
ing, he said "Yup, it sure is."
DIAL 5-6290"
ENDS THURSDAY
This picture is antiestablish-
mentarian, antibellum, anti-
septic, antibiotic, antisocial,
& antipasto.
M
TECHNICOLOR' '
Re'eased by COMMONWEALTH UNITED

~TAT E
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20TH CENTURY- FOX
PRESENTS A
ROBERT YouNGum
PRODUCTION

fPIPTH FPCrUM]
FIPTM AVENUE AT LINOIRTY
OOWN1'CWN ANN ARBORt
INFORMtATION T1-0100
7:15 and 9:00
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not admitted

I

SHOWS AT:
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7:00& 9:00 PM.

'U.

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found the audience re-
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outright belly laughs."
-WCBS

A

Coming
Thursday

4ti1 mi

Starting
Thursday

Vincent Canby, New York Times, adds his praise:
"I like Scorsese's enthusiasm
...he is effective in isolating
the moments of Miarty-like
boredom that J. R. accepts as
concomitants to life-a
drunken beer party that
almost turns into a gang
bang, a love scene in which
the camera swoops around a
nude couple as if the
photographer were a
vertiginous Peeping Tom."
tIM A TRIMOD FILM PRESENTATI
A JO5Si'i1 BUNNiR ASSOCIATU ESAL1
THURSDAY --
FRIDAY PLUS 2nd FEATURE SAT. & SL
ON HW AN EXPERIMENTAL FILM AT
ONE SHOW1:104:
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ioN
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DWGRFFITHS
tmaar+ai ca.i
The 0. W. Griffith
masterpiece.
as ne conceived
and created it

A

, ..

A R NIA-, OCATS PRESENTATION
LiI . ,DNISH fH[NoRYB. WALTHALL' MAE MARSH
MIRIAM C0OPER DONALD CRISP - WALLACE REID
RAQUL 'W A, ,u aCt P &oucim R
~ ofrtod by Q0. W WRh

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2

_ 54 . N.I I .' I W ~ '~

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