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May 06, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-05-06

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN AIL

_.. _... . - 1 - J

STRIKES, BOMBINGS:
Protests sweep U.S. campuses

200 organize class strike at U';
Fleming asks memorial service

DIAL
5-6290 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Shows at
It,3, 5,7f9:05

(Continued from Page 1) '
the Cambodian issue and the
deaths at Kent State.
Notre Dame University canceled
all classes for today, as did North-
western where 3,000 students
buried coffins in memory of the
Kent dead.'
In Washington, D.C., antiwar
groups called for rallies and vigils
on tomorrow, a national day of
mourning Friday and a march on
the White House Saturday.
In Waltham, Mass., a national
student strike information center
was set up at Brandeis University.
In New York, classes were sus-
pended or rallies scheduled at most
colleges and many high schools.
Columbia University and New
York University classes were sus-
pended. Student pickets march at
Hunter College.
A statewide march in Lansing
next Monday was being planned
last night by students at Western
Michigan University in Kalana-
zoo. A spokesman for the group
said Eastern Michigan University,
Michigan State and Kay College,

also in Kalamazoo had agreed to
participate.
President Nixon's daughter,
Julie, and her husband, David
Eisenhower, were strikebound at
their apartment in Northampton,
Mass., as David's Amherst class-
mates struck to appose his father-
in-law's policies. Julie goes to
Smith, whose student body voted
for a strike.
Students at Finch College, a
fashionable girl's school in New
York from which Tricia Nixon was
graduated in 1968, went on strike
to protest dispatch of troops to
Cambodia.
At the University of Maryland
a faculty committee said the Na-
tional Guard has agreed to leave
the campus by noon today, unless
there were further disturbances.
About 350 faculty members said
they would take over watch duties
from the 500 Guardsmen and po-
lice who have been on duty since
antiwar demonstrations broke out
over the weekend.
The presidents of 37 Northeast
schools sent a petition to President

Kent Ohio: A tense,
quiet and empty town
By RICK PERLOFF patrol the adjoining streets munch
Special To The Daily food and sip coffee.
KENT, Ohio-This town was Kent gives the impression of a
deserted last night: its streets typical Midwestern college town
lacked pedestrians, its stores were with a rolling campus green and
closed and the only sounds came advertisements on the highway for
from National Guard jeeps which the University Inn.
rolled to a squeaky stop at street But that was not the atmos-
corners. phere yesterday as most of the
A 10 p.m. curfew was in effect vehicles which traveled along
and visitors were warned by Summit had three armed men sit-
guardsmen and citizens alike to ting inside them. The National
stay off the streets lest they spend Guard jeeps were eyed quietly by
the night in jail, three students sitting outside a
Martial law has been proclaim- Theta Chi fraternity house. Their
ed, and the town breathes it too-- manner was sullen. They had little
after four Kent State University to say.
students were killed Monday by A girl pointed to the Guard's
Nationaly Guardsmen. Students at patrol of the main campus and
Kent State had been protesting quietly cautioned visitors against
ROTC, U.S. involvement in Cam- approaching it. Newcomers to the
bodia and for black demands. The town who do enter the area are
ROTC building was burned down asked their business and newsmen
Friday night. have their names taken and are
The entrances to the main cam- directed to an administration
pus area were blocked by guards- building which clears all press.
men and Ohio state highway pa- As the curfew approached, t e
trolmen who wave a gun at visitors atmosphere grew more tenser. Gas
who attempt to enter. About 50 stations began to close as attend-
trucks and jeeps were lined up ants nervously eyed clocks, an-
Summit Road, Kent's main tho- xious to leave the campus area as
roughfare, and the guardsmen who soon as possible.

Nixon criticizing his Asian poli-
cies. The White House acknowl-
edged receipt of the communica-
tion but said Nixon has no imme-
diate plans to meet with them.
The Reserve Officers Training
Corps program was a particular
target of demonstrators.
Fire damaged the ROTC build-
ing at the University of Idaho, and
a fire bomb was tossed into the
University of Utah ROTC build-
ing but failed to ignite. The ROTC
building at Seton Hall University
in South Orange, N.J., also was fire
bombed.
About 500 University of Okla-
homa students clashed with more
than 100 police in an anti-ROTC
demonstration. Demonstrators oc-
cupied the University of Arizona
ROTC building.
Kansas University canceled an
ROTC parade scheduled for Fri-
day.
ROTC uniforms were burned at
the City College campus of the
City University of New York.
Police said a Boston University
freshman was burned from a fire
bomb he intended to throw at the
school's administration building.
The second fire in slightly more
than a week broke out on the
Northwestern University campus.
A small explosive device was set
off in a building at the University
of Miami, police said.
There were fires in the National
Guard Armory in Lewiston, Idaho,
and in the Naval ROTC building
in nearby Moscow, Idaho, on the
University of Idaho campus. There
were two attempts to fire bomb
the ROTC building at the Univer-
sity of Notre Dame.
Other fires were reported at the
University of Houston, Geneseo,
N.Y., high school, Syracuse, N.Y.,
University, the University of Ten-
nessee and the University of Cali-
fornia-Davis.
Some students sought to ob-
struct normal school functions by
taking over buildings or blocking
campus streets.
For the second straight day,
students at Stanford University
blocked the enrtances of campus
buildings.
"The joint is ninety-nine and
forty-four, one hundredths per
cent closed," a school spokesman
said.
About 150 students occupied the
ROTC building at Central Mich-
igan University in Mount Pleasant.
More than 200 did the same at the
University of Nebraska's Military
and Naval Science building.
And ther were several confron-
tations with police. In Buffalo.
N.Y., about 1,500 students left a
State University rally and marched
down Main Street chanting, "Re-
member Kent State," until they
were turned back by police.
HELD OVER*
2nd WEEK...
Shows at:
1 -3-5-7:05 & 9:15 P.M.
ANTONION s?
w i> mma
ca AM DMU ®-
II'Ill 1111 II

(Continued from Page 1)
another work day with such grave
tragedies occurring."
Over 200 people attended last
night's strike coalition meeting
and made final arrangements for
strike activities.
A second rally was scheduled
for 5 p.m. today.
The first dissemination of strike
information will begin this morn-
ing as picketers and leafletters
place themselves at strategic posi-
tions across campus.
After much debate last night
the coalition voted to emphasize
that the protest will be peaceful.
There was some indication, how-
ever, that certain factions intend
to engage in disruptive actions.
In order to ensure a "militant,
but disciplined, n on - v i o l e n t
march," the coalition has organ-
ized a contingent of student mar-
shals to stifle any outbreaks of
violence.
Members of local high school
organizations also met last night
to plan protest activities in their
own schools. Strikes there are
planned for Monday, and will be
preceded by leaftletting through-
out this week.
The statement by President
Fleming said: "All of us have been
shocked and depressed by the
tragic events on the Kent State
University cartipus," "A number of
faculty people have called me sug-
gesting that there be an oppor-

tunity for the academic com-
munity to share its sorrow in some
kind of convocation. ,
"Accordingly, I have initiated
arrangements for a memorial ser-
vice to be held on campus Thurs-
day, May 7, probably at noon,"
Fleming added.
In an earlier statement on the
wave of student strikes across the
country, Fleming said: "The depth
of alienation among youg people
over our involvement in Southeast
Asia is a national tragedy. I see
no hope that these wounds will be
healed so long as our present poli-
cy continues."
Meanwhile, Student Govern-
ment Council last night endorsed
the national student strike. In a
statement, SGC said, "We con-
demn the slaughter of four univer-
sity students at Kent State and
feel that their responsibility for
this tragedy lies in the calculated
effort of the Nixon-Agnew admin-
istration to destroy all forms of
dissent.
"The government must recog-
nize the rising crescendo of dissent'
against its policies," the statement
continued," and act in a manner
responsive to the growing concern'
of the American people over this
country's involvement in the war
in Southeast Asia. We demand an
immediate withdrawal of all
American troops in Southeast
Asia."

In anticipation of today's strike
activities, University administra-
tion representatives and SGC of-
ficers met with Mayor Robert
Harris and Police Chief Walter
Krasny last night to discuss the
proper action to be taken if dis-
ruptions occur. Administration of-
ficials said that disrupters would
be dealt with more severely now
than they had been during the
recent class strike supporting the
demands of the Black Action
Movement.
Fi

Daily Ciassifieds Get Results

STARTING FRIDAY

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MARCH at the WHITE HOUSE this

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Wednesday, May 6
Day Calendar
Tennis - U-M vs. Univ. of Miami
(Fla.): Tennis Courts, 2:30 p.m.
Placement Service

Career Planning, listings of openings,
registration and forming a resume, di-
rectories. Hours: 8:30-12 noon and 1:30-
4:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
Current Openilngs:Many Others
Nationwide
P.P.G. Industries, Detroit, advertising
and sales promotion, writing copy,
admin. duties, dev. and purchasing,
producing printed materials, BA/BS
Journ., Business, Eng., sci. areas, 0-2
years, some famil. w/technical/sci.
terms.'
Arco Electronics, Southfield, Mi., in-
side salesman, purchasing and office
functions, BSEE or related degrees, not
nec. engin., trust be famil, w/ elec-
tronic components, 0-2 yrs. exper. con-
sidered.
Mercy College of Detroit, ,assistant
director of admissions, recruiting at
high schools, BA/MA in areas such as
educ., soc. sci., lib. arts, counseling,
min. 1 year in people work.

Whats
your,
excuse?
You could have gone water ski-
ing or swimming or to a dance
at night. Instead you've spent
the entire day moping around
the house feeling sorry for
yourself. And why? Just be-
cause it was one of those diffi-
cult times? How ,silly. A lot of
girls are out there enjoying
themselves under the same cir-
cumstances. They use Tampax
tampons.
Tampax tampons are worn
internally so you can swim or
dance or do most anything you
please. There are no bulky pads
or telltale odor to give you
away. Tampax tampons are so
easy to use. Yes, even the first
time. Just follow the instruc-
tions inside each package. So
go on out and enjoy yourself.
With Tampax tampons you
have no excuse.

I

marimekko
ORTHOGONAUTY
340 Maynard Street / Ann Arbor
Phone 662-2600

weekend.
Meeting 7:30 p.m., Wed. May 6
1st floor of the SAB
ACT NOW TO END THE WAR
sponsored by: Ann Arbor New Mobe

I

U.

I

------------

General Division
3200 S.A.B.
MAY, JUNE and AUGUST
come in and use P.S. thiso

GRADS,
summer.

DIAL 8-6416
"The year's ultimate spec-
tacle, in the best sense, is
Luchino Visconti's extra-
ordinary n e w f i l m "The
Damned." It may be the
chef d'oeuvre of the great
Italian director! A rare treat
. . the film triumphs!"
. -Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times
DAMMED
TECHNICOLOR*
AN ALFRED LEVY- EVER HAGGIAG PRODUCTION
W. !ROOUCItNG
DIRK 4GRI HELMUT HELMUT RENAUD UMBERTO ALBRECHT
WEDNESDAY SHOWS AT 1:30-4:30-7:30

give her pretty dream-wear by Leonora
on Mother's Day. . .just the kind of
gift she loves in cool, comfortable
polyester/cotton with fancy frills. P-S-M-L.
':: ..; Eyelet-yoked gown-robe set in blue

)M

or maize, $23

The gown alone, $10

Ruffled sleep-shift, pink or blue, $12

I

$ t
1>
y { .

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RADICAL FILM SERIES

PRESENTS
The Organizer

dir. Mario Monicelli

MARCELLO MASTROIANNI

"Focuses on the struggles of poor, uneducated mill workers in 11

4. .~'j 4~ ~ i '/JI Uild*'V iW ~U & ~ &i ki

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