100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 08, 1970 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-08-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

~4w itir4ivan.DOutj
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students of the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The Michicoin Daily express the individual,
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.

-T

Saturday; August 8, 1970

THE MICNIGAN DAILY~

4

theatre
~Egg': A t the end, you care

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 76
12 Noon Deadline Monday through friday, 10:00 to 3:00

SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1970

News Phone: 764-0552

A very old story
THE RECENT Congressional hearings on migratory
worker conditions served to once again focus atten-
tion on the problems of the nation's poor.
Attention that had waned considerably since a White
House conference late in 1969 addressed the problem of
hunger, one of the more disturbing and, to the well-fed,
more incongruous aspects of poverty. Cambodia, the Mid-
dle East, crime, pollution; inflation and campus rebel-
lions occupied the public, the headlines and the lawmak-
ers, not necessarily in that order, while an estimated 24
million people continued to live in poverty.
AT LEAST PART of the reason the nation's attention
has been diverted away from the poor, the apologists
might argue, is that the problem is gradually going away.
Indeed, with a trace of the irony that is so common to
Washington, the census bureau issued a communique to
that affect in the same week that the Senate Subcom-
mittee on Migratory Labor was investigating the condi-
tions of migrant workers.
According to the Census Bureau's figures, there were
about 40 million poor people in 1960, comprising slightly
more than 20 per cent of the population. By the end of
the decade, the number of poor people had declined by
more than 15 million - 12 per cent of the population.
The fact that poverty is "going away," however, of-
fers scant satisfaction to those whose income is below the
poverty level (currently $3800 for a family of four). For
poverty, though it may be disappearing on paper, is a
stark and naked reality for those who continue to live in
it.
CONSIDER, FOR EXAMPLE, some of the findings of the
subcommittee. Children of migrant workers were de-
scribed as being grossly undernourished and deaf and de-
formed from preventable diseases such as rickets and po-
lio.
In Crittenden County, Arkansas, for example, it has
been reported that the county's only food-stamp office
line is closed at 9:30 a.m. to insure that the stamps will
be distributed no later than 2 p.m. The result is that many
people who qualify for, and need stamps, never get them.
Administrative boondoggles such as these are quite
widespread. Even more disturbing though, are the fig-
ures on the national food stamp program. Of the more
than 20 million poor people in this country, less than six
million receive any stamps at all.
And the conditions of the urban poor, supposedly the
more visible and vocal members of this too-easily forgot-
ten minority, would be a source of embarrassment as well
as concern if this was a country that cared more. Rat-
bitten children may no longer be a big issue, but unem-
ployment, housing and welfare payments are. To give
just one illustration, in every major city, the welfare pay-
ments are nowhere near equal to the $3800 the govern-
ment estimates is necessary to maintain a family of four
at subsistence level. In Washington, D.C., for example, a
city where "pockets of poverty" are a 60 cent cab ride
from the Capitol, a family of four on welfare receives only
75 per cent of that figure.
Even without these examples, though, the idea that
poverty is "going away" is still unconvincing. For while
some people are climbing out of poverty, others, such as
the migrant workers and the welfare mothers, are making
far less progress. The Census Bureau apparently does not
keep (or maybe it keeps, but doesn't publish) figures on
migrant workers, but it does say that the number of pov-
erty-stricken black families headed by women has in-
creased from around 480,000 families in 1959 to more than
700,000 families today.
PERHAPS THE MOST disturbing aspect of poverty in
America today is that this country needs to devote any
attention to it at all. The plight of the migrant worker,
as was pointed out during the Senate hearings, was docu-
mented long ago in John Steinbeck's The G r a p e s of
Wrath. The conditions of the workers are an old story.
Then, too, there is the Census Bureau's estimate that
it would have taken only $10 billion last year to raise the
income of all the poor people above the poverty level. Yet,
in an economy generating about 90 times that amount,
the money has not yet been found to finance a meager
Family Assistance Program.
The failure to find the money to help the poor is, of
course, related to the question of priorities. And that, too,
is an old story.'
-ERIC SIEGEL

By GARY HUMMEL
Peter Nichols' "A Day in the
Death of Joe Egg" will make you
want to laugh and cry at the same
time. Presented by the University
Players as part of the Michigan
Repertory program, "Joe Egg" is a
dark comedy whose subject seems
not at all funny. How could the
disguised agony of an ordinary
British couple trying to cope with
an epileptic, unresponsive child
possibly provoke laughter? But the
actors' movements and dialogue
accomplish a miracle and you do
laugh. From the first moment of
the play when Bri, the husband,
bursts onto the stage and cows
the, people in the audience by
treating them like a group of un-
ruly schoolboys in one of his class-
es, "Joe Egg" manages to be
screamingly funny.
Bri, the schoolteacher and his
wife Sheila have a caustic humor
which is merely. a cover-up for the
sadness and ache which pervades
their lives. As Bri states near the
end the play, "It could have been
a good marriage, but . .."
Bri and Sheila also have no
ready solution for Joe's problems.
The words of love which they
speak to her when pretending she
is normal are colored with caustic
kindness and burning wit. In-
deed, they mock the supreme or-
der that created their chaos, their
dementia.
Bri, bearish, vociferous, and
jaunty is always telling jokes to
hide his despair. He needs the love
of his wife and confesses this need
to the audience, just as Sheila
stands alone and wishes that Bri
would have more faith and be less
self-pitying.
Together, they compulsively act
out a series of playlets-the first
visit to the doctor, the explanation
of a Viennese neurologist who pro-
nounces Joe a "vegetable," and
the prim vicar who comes to com-
fort an uncomprehending mother,
promise the healing power of God,
and hear her confession of pre-
marital promiscuity. All these
events have past, yet they are not
forgotten and recur again and
again in Bri and Sheila's lives as
if to compensate somehow for the
"universal shaft," the "manic de-
pressive rugby player" as Bri puts
it.
Stephen Wyman, as director,
has made "Joe Egg" the best of
the summer productions. Dialogue,
movement, and setting-note the
use Brian's paintings to reinforce

the image of his insanity-unite
to produce dramatic action which
portrays human feeling. When
Bri, as the vicar, confesses that
after all. "God is only human,"
and then pats his face with sur-
prise, the audience roars with
laughter.
Robert Porter, as Bri, expresses
a full range of moods. He travels
from one mood to another with
ease and that one is not aware he
is acting. One need only watch him
surprise his guests disguised as a
cowboy or suddenly look up and
apologise to God after calling Him
an ill-tempered bastard to under-
stand his vitality and sense of
precision in movement.
Roberta Ann Raider plays Sheila
with a sensitivity and sympathy
towards the character. She pro-
jects a certain clarity of faith and
firmness of purpose which makes
Sheila at once admirable and
pathetic. And it is because of Miss
Raider's skill, that Sheila becomes
a woman who loves and soothes

all things, yet is bewildered and
unsure.
One.must also compliment Made-
leine Ram, a tall striking woman,
who plays the smooth, bored, yet
not inhuman Pam. Pam, of course,
wants to put to sleep all those
NPAs-not physically attractive
people. Richard Dean -is appro-
priately corny as Pam's husband,
a well-to-do socialist-rationalist
whose efforts to "correct" Sheila
and Bri's troubles are rumbling
faux pas.
Linda Steinman is possibly too
young-looking b u t adequately
cloying as Bri's shrill, doting
mother, and Tanya Seeman dis-
plays poise during her short mon-
ologue.
"Joe Egg's" fast movement, al-
most demands a camera to ┬░ollow
it. But this is not a fault, since
it increases the plays intensity.
The acting is so convincing that
when Bri asks "aren't you a little
relieved?" (after pretending he
has killed Joe) the audience finds
out it is.

Letters to the Editor

FOR RENT
GARAGES-May be locked, lease, 723
Packard near State. 15071
FOR FALL-Modern 2-man apartment
near campus. 663-3890. 12C64
TENTS-TENTS-TENTS
We need many tents for the first week
in Sept. Have a Tent? Want some ex-
citement? Call us 10-5 763-3102. This
is as important as your apt. itself.
CD71
FAR-OUT furnished house near arb,
must be 21 plus, and share lg. bed-
room. $77/mo./person plus utilities.
Tom-761-5491, Chuck-769-2986 (be-
fore 3:30 p.m.). 13C63
ROOMS FOR MEN ONLY
No cooking, nicely furn. $60-75/mo.
668-6906. 1346 Geddes. 47Ctc
FURNISHED, spacious 1 and 2 bdrm.
apts., all conveniences, air condition-
ed, undercover parking. 1-864-3052.
SOCtc
FURN., MOD. 2 BDRMS.
911 S. FOREST
near Hill St.
3-man, $77/ea. 4-man, $65/ea.
CALL 688-6906.
46Ctc
ROOM FOR RENT-Furn. Call 761-5026
before 11 a.m. 2C63
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus.
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448,. 5Ctc
LOVELY 2-bdrm. furn., prof. or couplt
preferred. $185. 668-6906. 49Ctc
2-MAN, 1 BDRM. modern apt. near hos-
pital, modern kitchen, A/C, balcony,
Aug. '70-Aug. '71. $190. 769-4269 after
4. 7C66
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets. storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest. Cte
NEED AN APARTMENT
AND/OR ROOMMATES?
MEET YOUR
MATCHMAKERS
Chris & Nancy . . .
Who will help you select your
modern, bi-level apt.
Several furnished 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments still available at con-
venient campus locations.
Dishwashers, vacuum cleaners, bal-
conies, 11 baths, air cond., park-
ing, laundry & storage facilities.
24 hour maintenance service.
CHARTER REALTY
665-8825

Here come the beds
To the Editor:
JOHN FELDIKAMP, director of
the Office of University Housing,
is alleged to have assured several
individuals that there is to be no
repetition next month of last fall's
dorm housing crisis, during which
hundreds of students were lodged
in libraries, recreation rooms, caf-
eterias and the like due to lack of
prior planning on the part of the
housing office.
Nonetheless, interesting things
are taking place. The ninth floor
(men's side) of South Quad, in-
tended to be a study hall, h a s
been filled with approximately
thirty double bunks and accom-
panying dressers, a situation that
implies planned lodging for a
number of unlucky newcomers to
the University.
There are several possible ex-
planations to this seeming con-
tradiction. The first of these is
that Feldkamp is prevaricating -
but nobody would suggest that!
The next one is that Mr. Feld-
kamp does not know w h a t the
people under him a r e doing, a
condition which I, with four years

of housing experience, consider
quite possible. Perhaps the bunks
are not meant for students, but
for visiting scholars and business-
men 'inhconventions? Finally,
there is the possibility that th e
statements attributed to Mr. Feld-
kamp are entirely false and that
there will after all be a housing
crisis this fall. If this is the case,
there is one bright spot in an oth-
erwise gloomy picture: since it is
now the beginning of August, the
situation has become visible sev-
eral weeks earlier than the iden-
tical situation last year - at least
to those of us already on campus!
--William M. Klykylo, Grad.
Aug. 1
(EDITOR'S NOTE: According to the
South Quad building director and Mr.
Hughes of the housing office, the beds
will provide, as they have inthepast,
temporary housing for international
students.)
The Editorial Page of The
Michigan Daily is open to any-
one who wishes to submit
articles. Generally speaking, all
articles should be less than
1,000 words.

FOR RENT
FOR GRADUATES or teaching fellows;
clean, very quiet. No cooking. 723
Packard near State. 14C71
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Wall St.-Furnished, new, modern
1 and 2 bedrooms available. 1-864-
3852. 11Ctc
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40!
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2, 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co.,Property Management Dept. 100
S. Main. 30tc
APARTMENT LOCATOR-$12.50, 1, 2,
and 3 bdrm. fall apts. on and off
campus. 1217 S. Univ. 761-7764. 40tc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc. 663-
6448. SOCtc
TWO BEDROOM, furnished unit, near
law and business schools. Please call
Professional Management Assoc., 769-
4227. 4Ctc
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Several beautifully decorated, fur-
nished, 2-bedroom, b-level apts.
still available for fail semester.
Dishwashers 0 Vacuum cleaners
1 Baths * Air-Cond. * Balconies
Parking 0 Laundry and Storage
facilities * Excellent sound con-
ditioning.
Call the Resident Manager at
161-1717 or 665-8825 or stop in
at the lobby office 12 noon to 6 p.m.
daily, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
761-1717
liCtc
4-MAN
ON CAMPUS
711 ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $260/
mo. Featuring:
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
3671
STATE STREET MANOR
1111 S. State Street
2, 3, or 4 man large apts.
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
1-864-3852
1-353-7389
Ctc
CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
38Cte
SANS SOUC I APTS
Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
31C,
WANTED TO RENT .
HOUSING for 2% thru Nov. 21 or be-
fore. 665-6378. 3667
SENIOR GIRL needs room in house, eff.
apt., or own bdrm. in apt. Will pay
up to $90/mo. -Nancy, 665-3807 after 6.
37L67
1 VERY LARGE room or small apt.,
furnished or unfurnished. Anywhere
near Ann Arbor. 663-5512. LD67
MOTHER going to school and 2 yr. old
son looking for small apt. or room
with bathroom and kitchen privi-
leges. 769-1447, after 5. Can afford
$75. 33L66

SENIOR, employed, seeking apartment,
eff., or room with cooking ,priv. Will
commute to campus if nec. Not in-
terested in modern apt. Ask- for
Glen at 769-4925: 34L4

LINES 1 day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
.5 1,55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2.40
10 2.60
INCHES
1 2.60
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 i0.70

2 days
1.60
2.15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4.95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35
21.10

3 dovs
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55
31.40

4 days
3.00
4.05
_4.05
4.65
6.35
7.20
7.90
8.70
9.30
9.30
17.85
25.50
33.45
41.40

UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES

Additional costs per day after six days.
Ads that are 1 1/, 21nd ,31/, etc. inch size will be billed at the
average of the lower and higher inch rate.

FOR SALE

1335 S. University

9Ctc

5 days
3.65
4.85
5.90
6.90
7.85
8.85
9.75
10.65
11.35
11.35
21.75
31.15
40.95
51.15

6 dos
4.20
5.65
6.90
8.05
9.25
10.40
11.45
12.60
13.60
13.30
25.40
36.65
48.30
60.50

add.
.b0
.80
.95
1.15
1.30
1.45
1.55
1.70
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1:40

BELIEVE IT OR NOT
Sen. Bursley caught trashing
By MARTIN HIRSCHMAN
STROLLING DOWN E. Liberty
Street last night I noticed Ann
Arbor Republican State Sen. Gil-
bert Bursley emerging from his-
be-stickered blue convertible.-.,
We decided to trail him.Ar
Bursley strolled up the block
and turned onto South State. He
strolled (unaccosted) past the
panhandlers at the entrance to
Nichol's Arcade and peered into
some of the store windows. Then
he doubledbackrand ducked into 4 4.
PJ's to pick up an ice cream cone.

LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are
looking for? Tell them cheaply, yet
effectively in Daily classifieds. 764-
0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. DU
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED L EVIS ?
VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims .......6.50
Button-Fly........6.50
Traditional......6.98
Bells ............7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS ..........2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's ... 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's.... . 6.98
Nuvo's ...........8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!v
Sam's Store
122 E. Washington

2 STEREO Speaker systems. Ideal for
apt. Excel. cond. 663-9821. 11B651
1968 CHAMPION Mobile Home, 12 ft. x
60 ft., 2 bdrm., carpeted living room,1
17 miles from AA, may remain on
present site, exc. cond., terms avail-
able, located in modern park. 662-.
3803. 48B68
SAILBOAT-14' Pintail sloop, fiberglas
hull, aluminum mast, dacron sails,
complete trailer, $825 firm. 971-6015.
663
LEAVING COUNTRY-VM stereo table
model with mahagony cabinet. Very
good sound. $35. Olivetti portable
typewriter with canvas case, excellent
condition. $25. Call 662-0348 evenings,
764-0510 mornings. BD71'
ADMIRAL Portable TV, 12 inch, instant
play, practically new, must sell to
study. $75. 769-7683 persistently. BD63
CONN TENOR SAX-New neck, good
condition, $175. 665-7282. 3B63
ROOMMATES WANTED
FEMALE ADV. GRAD. with car. Share
house thru Nov. $50/mo. Evengs., 65-
9657. 214 Crest. 50Y68
FOURTH GIRL needed for Carriage
House apartment. Call 665-5606. 51Y67
MALE GRAD. roommate wanted; apt.
near . Forest and Cambridge. 761-
9364. 45Y63
4TH GIRL WANTED for beautiful apt.
in house, $70 mo., ut. paid. Call
Wendy or Doris, 769-0874. 46Y63
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to share
2-man apt. on Oakland. 665-2489.
47Y65
ONE MALE ROOMMATE needed for a
4-man apt. for fall, excellent loca-
tion (1 block from Law Quad), 2
bdrms., 2 air conditioners, dishwash-
er. Call 769-6997. 48Y65
MALE GRAD roommates needed to fill
4-man, 2 bdrm. apart., $75/mo. Cali
763-3244 or 665-4393. 44Y63
SENIOR WISHES to share apt.or
house. Own room preferred. Call
Andy, 663-8138. YD63
WANTED-1 or 2 girls to fill apartment.
Call 761-8693, Barb/Mar. Be persis-
tent. 42Y65
2 GIRLS for mod. A/C, trn. 4-man
apt., campus location, $80/mo. Call
761-1409 or 663-6091 after 5:30. 43Y64
WANTED-2 or 3 girls to fill apartment.
769-3130 after 4:30. 32Ytc
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED - Opportunity to tape new
albums, such as Traffic, Doors. Steve
Miller, Donovan, John ]Gee Hooker,
etc. Will pay $1.00 per album. Call
Drew at 662-3528. Also, need first 2
Buffalo Springfield. MD64
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND BOARD for 2 student girls,
linens, quiet area, $23, for fal. 549
4th St. 12E64
PHOTO SUPPLIES
AT CENTURY
The Best in
Good Used Cameras
WE BUY, SELL, TRADE.
Everything Photographic
DARKROOM SUPPLIES
LUMINOUS PAPER
Repairs on all makes -
Century Camera
(At our new location)
4254 N. Woodward, Royal Oak
Between 13 and 14 Mile Rd
LI 9-6355
Take I-94 to Southfield Expr. North to
13 Mile Road-then East to
Woodward-and North
(Michigan Bank, Security and Diner
Charges accepted)
IDtt.

MERCURY COMET-1963, 60,000 miles.
Radio, automatic transmission, no
rust, very good condition, leaving the
country. $400. Contact H. Ochoa,
University Towers, 536 S. Forest,
Apt. 6K (anytime) or call 764-4424
(weekdays). 51N65
1965 OPEL, tan, 28 mpg., 47,000 miles,
exc. transportation, best offer over
$425. 663-1401. 47N67

FORD, 1963rGalaxie hardtop, air, 390
cu. in., original owner, very little
rust, good runner, best offer takes.
Call 434-0392 after 5 or weekend.
52N67
FOUND-1970 Mich. motorcycle license
No. F6848 on Forest by Palmer Field.
761-4534. ND63

HELP WANTED
BARMAIDS
Full or part time. Apply 208 W. Huron.
31H71
SMALL CAMPUS office seeking full-
time permanent typist-receptionist.
665-2490 for interview appt. 271164
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Full or part time. Apply 208 W. Huron.
321171
ATTENTION
STUDENT HUSBANDS
Put your wives to work. Applications
now being taken for P.H.T. (putting
hubby through). Inquire now. 971-
8700. 301H63
AMERICAN Academic Environments,
Cambridge, Mass., is a young company
marketing quality consumer design
products to retail outlets. We are now
recruiting for full time positions for
the fall season. Experience is desired,
and a car and willingness to travel is
necessary. For further information
contact the Student Employment
office. 25H63
URGENT-Foster family needed for 15-
yr.-old girl, ward of Juvenile Court.
Call 663-7860. Family in school con-
sultation project. 26H63
USED CARS
BLUE 1964 VW, AM-FM radio, snow
tires included. $280. 668-6046. 50N66

8
F
I
1
l
i
i
t
t
t
i

i

I

-1

FORD, 1963 Galaxie hardtop, air, origi-
nal owner, very little rust, good run-
ner, best offer takes. 434-0392 after
5 or weekend. 49N65
FORD SPRINT V-8 convert. Al-power,
auto., deluxe interior, perfect. 662-
7713. 46N64
PORSCHE 1964 voupr, excellent con-
dition, new tires and radio, $2100 or
best offer. 769-7549 after 5:00. 45N63
BUSINESS SERWICES
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service: 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
_761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.

7
1
7
k 7
'r
k
C
i

BURSLEY
toward his car
the sidewalk..

STROLLED back
and stood there on
We . stood there

about ten feet away watching him.
Having consumed the last 'of his
cone, Bursley stepped toward his
oar, ditched his ice cream-soaked
napkin in the gutter and got in,
Having watched this true-life
drama from afar, I made the in-
scrutable (and, I thought), cour-
ageous decision to interpose my-
selfrbetween Bursley and the
gutter.
I stepped over to the curb and
picked up the napkin. Then I
walked over to the car.
"Senator?" I asked with a tone
of interest in my voice.
"'Yes?" he responded, looking
up with a half-smile. -
I handed him the napkin, which
he accepted without a 'change of
expression. I turned and walked
away.

26Ptc

MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-20u-,
Jto

I -

2

GIRLS NEED APT., efficiency, or
rooms. 8 mo. lease? 769-4979, like old
places. 35L64

NIGHT EDITOR: ERIKA HOFF

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan