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August 08, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-08-08
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Page Six

tHE MICHIGA J DAILY

0

Saturday, August 8, 1970

Saturday, August 8, 1970

MICHIGAN DAILY

f

Shuler
announces
candidacy
Jack Shuler, president of the
University Alumni Association, has
formally announced his candidacy
for a Republican nomination to
the University's Regents, it was
reported yesterday.
Other candidates who are of-
ficially in the running for the two
nominations to be made at the
state GOP convention later this
month are Paul Goebel Jr. of
Grand Rapids and Deane Baker o
Ann Arbor.
Shuler, 52, said in his campaign
he will stress his belief "the es-
sential role of the university i
education and the advancement of
the frontiers of knowledge ....
The university itself is not an
agentuofsocial or p o l itica l
change."
The asociate general counsel for
Michigan Bell Telephone Co. said
the University "is a priceless asset
of the state of Michigan. Its ex-
cellence must be maintained and
strengthened.
"Improved communications with
citizens, alumni, legislators, stu-
dents and faculty must be a con-
tinuing goal. Essential financial
support, both public and private,
depends upon confidence in the
policies and administration of the
University."
The national University of
Michigan A u m n i Association
headed by Shuler represents about
250,000 University graduates.
Shuler received a BA degree in
engineering from the University in
1940 and a law degree in 1942.
U' store
reports
break-in
LANSING OP) - Michigan vot-
ers will decide this November
whether they w a n t to give 18-
year-olds the right to join their
ranks at the ballot boxes.
The State Senate v o t e d 28-6
yesterday for a House-passed
Constitutional amendment that
would lower Michigan's voting
age from 21 to 18, if approved by
the voters.
Gov. William Milliken, w h o
stood firmly behind the proposal,
already has told U.S. Atty. Gen.
John Mitchell t h a t Michigan
would comply with provisions of
the n e w Federal Voting Rights
Act, which includes an 18-year-
old vote section.
Michigan voter approval of a
change in the State Constitution
would provide what Senator Rob-
ert Vanderlaan (R-Kentwood)
termed "insurance" against any
unfavorable ruling by a federal
court.
NGC THEATRE CORPORATION
A NATIONAL ENERAL COMPANY
375 No.MAPLE RD.-7694300
MON.-FRI. 8:15 ONLY
SAT.-SUN. 1:45-5:00-8:30

t *
C *
~ nws brie fd's
k "4#t 4 k ~t &t' s~v w+V t~i *,chsktA tt %
B The A.So(af ld Prey'ss
+ LOADING OF 30,000 TONS of deadly nerve gas rockets onto
railroad cars at Anniston, Ala., and Richmond, Ky., began yester-
day in preparation for a controversial trip toward the depths
of the Atlantic Ocean.
Men in protective clothes carefully hoisted concrete and steel
vaults containing the obsolete but still dangerous rockets onto gon-
dola-type freight cars at Army depots near the two cities.
* * *
THE ARMY drastically shortened yesterday the length of
active duty required of about half the college ROTC graduates
entering the service this year.
The move affects about 7,500 men who will be required to serve
only a three to six-month active duty training tour, instead of two
years in uniform, before being released to the National Guard or
Ready Reserve.
* * *
WEST GERMANY'S FOREIGN MINISTER yesterday signed
a new German-Soviet nonaggression and cooperation treaty ac-
cepting for the first time the postwar loss of eastern German
territory to the Soviet Union and Poland.
Foreign Minister Walter Scheel will report on the new treaty at
a West German cabinet meeting tonight. The cabinet must approve
the treaty before it can become official.
* * *
TUPAMAROS GUERRIlAS in Uruguay yesterday kid-
napped a 65-year-old U.S. agricultural expert,
The guerrillas are currently holding another American and a
Brazilian diplomat in exchange for the release of all political prisoners
being held in Uruguay.
THOMAS W. SANDERS said yesterday he is challenging a
Senate investigative subcommittee's authority to force him to
testify -- the first such challenge in 30 years - because he
wants to protect the sources who contributed to the magazine
Black Politics, which he helped edit.
The subcommittee, headed by Sen. John L. McClellan (D-Ark)
wants him to testify about the magazine which the committee claims
advocated sabotage and guerilla warfare and provides bomb-making
instructions.

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8,000

dig

blues

festival

ope

By JONATHAN MILLER
As nearly 200,000-young people gathered yesterday in Goose
Lake for the three day rock and roll festival, Ann Arbor saw the
opening of the annual blues festival.
Although the parallel timed event near Jackson may have
hurt blues festival attendance, the crowd in Ann Arbor is not the
archetypal "festival going" crowd. Rather, it is a serious gather-
ing of music lovers, come to the best blues event of the year.
Many of the "blues heads" gathered yesterday were openly
grateful to the Goose Lake festival. One girl put it succinctly,
"I'm glad they've got this rock thing going on, it keeps the
idiots away from here."
License plates from almost every state of the union were
visible as people pitched tents on Hubbard Rd. on North Cam-
pus.
A miniature tent city had formed as early as Wednesday
night as those people who had travelled from as far as California
to attend the festival arrived in Ann Arbor.
Volunteer teams of "Psychedelic Rangers" are on traffic
duty for a mile radius around the festival in an attempt to
minimize inconvenience to local residents, while on the festival
grounds security patrols wearing white blues festival T-shirts
are on duty.
A medical team is also on hand for the entire duration of
the festival.
They said incidents of people on bad acid trips which have
been reported from almost every other famous festival held
during the past year were conspiciously absent.
The blues festival seems to mean different things to dif-
ferent people. To many of the musicians it is an annual re-
union. To the audience it is an opportunity to hear the very best.
blues in the world. Everyone seemed to be digging it last night:
even the police were smiling.

I

DOC ROSS PERFORMS at the blues festival last night. The crowd asser
near North Campus heard five hours of continuous music on the festiva
Sunday music is scheduled to begin at noon.

I

mmw Wime a
ClARK GABLE T
Academy
VIVI N LEIGh A""rd
JJESUE HOWARD
OLiVI deHAILLAND

Goose Lake festival
draws 200,000 fans

PERMANENT LOCATION
Panel. asks iu

MOTIPH MO(UM
P1FI'IAWUNUO AT LM 90TV
OOWNTOWN ANN ARON~
IW4FOMATION 7!M<7001@

SAT., SUN.-1 :00, 5:00, 9:00
MON., TUES.-7:30 only

DOUBLE FEATURE-STARTS WEDNESDAY
"END OF THE ROAD" and "BELLE DE JOUR"

I.

WORSHIP

From Wire Service Reports
Some Canadians bent on attending
the Goose Lake festival near Jackson
were turned back yesterday at the
Canadian-American border at Detroit.
Thomas Peterson, district director
for the U.S. Immigration Service, said
27 youths from Humber College of
Toronto were refused eitry Thursday
night and some smaller groups and
stragglers were turned back yesterday.
Peterson said entry was denied be-
cause those en route to the festival
failed to have proper identification or
any funds and some were foreigners
residing in Canada and seeking entry
without a passport.
Harvey Obshinsky of Detroit's radio
station WABX, said he had received
calls from some who were barred from
entry who contended they had tickets
purchased in advance and did have
funds, some with as much as $50.
Some without funds said they had
been promised jobs at Goose Lake.
Canadian officials at Buffalo, N.Y.,
were denying entry to Americans en
route to a festival outside Toronto who
they said had insufficient identifica-
tion or funds.

U.S. agents at Buffalo said 31 had
been arrested for possession of nar-
cotics. No similar arrests were reported
at the Detroit-Windsor entry points.
Despite border trouble, over 125,000
people were in the festival park at 8
a.m. yesterday, and a few hours later
police estimated the crowd at 162,000
with predictions that it would swell to
300,000.
Jackson County Sheriff Charles
Southworth reported 29 arrests out-
side the park, mostly for drunkenness
or possession of marijuana.
Cars, vans, trucks and motorcycles
lined main roads leading to the 390-
acre privately owned and fenced park,
and license plates included those from
California, Oklahoma, New York, Tex-
as, and Ohio, as well as Michigan.
Nonstop music blared from loud
speakers and rock devotees listened,
danced, smoked, ate beans from cans
and sandwiches, drank pop, beer and
wine and made love.
A reporter spied one handsome youth
walking alone and naked, playing a
flute as he strolled about. He said he
was Lenny from Chicago.

for ch~ld
By BILL ALTERMAN
The Administrative Liaison Committee
for Child Care recommended yesterday
that the children's day-care center be
moved into a University-owned house on
the corner of E. University and S. Uni-
versity.
The center will have to vacate its pres-
ent location in Mary Markley residence
hall August 22 to make way for students
coming for the fall semester.
With President Robben Fleming out of
town, Vice President for Academic Af-
fairs Allen Smith will probably make the
final decision on the day c a r e center
move. -
A spokesman for the center, Marilyn
Koster, yesterday expressed concern at
the decision. "We don't think prepara-
tions will be completed by September 3.
We'll be in a spot as it is for the 10 days
we have no place to go."
Under the liaison committee's plan the
center will be able to store its furniture
in Markley until it can be moved to the
new location. The committee also recom-

vein
mended emp]
the center.
Planning f
January whe
eration asked
Fleming apps
ed by educat
hen to study
Little prog
izers presente
requesting sp
They were
eral residenc
the dining rc
When the
staff shortag
limit the nun
stay to three
strictions ha
children are
entire day.
Mrs. Koste
has been ace
30 children
about ten in

[

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.--Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
10:00 a.m. - Rev. Terry N. Smith - "Who
Leads the Blind?"
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church--662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
SUNDAY, AUG. 9
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon by R. Edward
McCracken-"Living It Up."
Broadcast WNRS, 1290 AM-WNRZ, 103 FM,
11:00 a.m. to noon.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m'
Sermon by Mr. Sanders.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefyt and Paul Swets
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
10:30 a.m.-"Sensitivity Training"-Calvin S.
Malefyt,

UNITY CENTER OF
PRACTICAL CHRISTIANITY
310 S. State
663-4314
Mrs. Eleonore Kraft, Minister
Sunday Service-11:00 a.m.
Study Class-Mrs. Kraft-7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Prayer and Counseling-10:00 a.m. Wednes-
day.
Center Is Open-Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
11-2; Tuesday, 3-6 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-For sure, plus any other time we
happen to fall in together-Come and find
out,
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 a.m.-Worship Service.
Sunday at 10:45 a.m.-Sunday Morning Class.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenow)
Minister: Rev. Donald Postemo
10:00 a.m.-"The Future as Second Coming."
5:00 p.m.-Common meal.
6:00 p.m.-"Love."
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, tronsportation, personalized
help, etc. phone 76),-6299 or 761-6749.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services-8:00 and 9:30 a.m.
Church School-9:30 a.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM,
1600, Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Goede, Minister
8:00 p.m. Sunday evening-"Working for
social change inside and outside of elec-
toral politics." Discussion will be led by
Jean King and Marty Scott.

LUTHERAN STUDENT
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Contemporary
Communion.

CHAPEL

Liturgy and Holy

CONCERT-GOERS at the Ann
Arbor Blues Festival yesterday
assemble a tent in preparation
for the long weekend ahead. The
festival will continue through
Sunday.
-Daily-Sara Krulwich

Ab
land
ear
2s, , g4 out
the
ated
TA
style
new
Rc
arot
dow
shou
flag
dow
the
&x poses
x s menu

GEORGE KARL
C. SCOTT/ MALDEN

WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Discussion.
9:00 p.m.-Worship.

THE ARK
1421 Hill-761-1451
Communal Dinner.

[II -______________ *

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