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August 06, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-06

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E1;t £frijan Dafij
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students of the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed, in The Michion Daily exoress the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in oll reorints.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 1970 News Phone: 764-0552
Kangyaroo's court
A T THE Parsons hearing yesterday, someone remarked
that the proceedings were a kangaroo court.
A woman was heard to ask, "But where is the kan-.
garoo?"
The answer came from the back of the room-"in
Australia."
President Robben Fleming is currently attending a
conference of educators in Australia.
-DEBRA THAL
What's the rush
DON'T LET ANYONE tell you that justice is not swift.
After all, Huey P. Newton, co-founder of the Black
Panther Party was released from jail -yesterday after
serving only almost two years.
In keeping with its reputation of all due speed, it
took the California District Court of Appeals only one and
a half years to order a new trial deciding that the judge
presiding at Huey's murder trial really should have in-
formed the jury that if Huey was unconscious at the time
of the policeman's murder, he was innocent.
But then, everyone is really used to the long appellate
procedure. What is not quite so easily explained is why
Huey had to. stay in jail after the appellate court ordered
a new trial. After all, he was freed yesterday, and the
appellate decision was rendered May 29.
-A. C.
Happy anniversary
JODAY IS THE 25th anniversary of the atomic bombing
that destroyed 60 per cent of Hiroshima, Japan and
killed between 66,000 and 200,000.
The figure is disputed.
--M. H.
NIGHT EDITOR: DEBRA THAL

Beating a dead horse

Thursday, Aug st 6, 1970

THE MIC-%GAN DAILY

7-

By MARTIN HIRSCHMAN
THE UNIVERSITYsadministra-
tion is after SDS member
Robert Parsons again, and this
time the whole affair is taking on
a comic air of unreality, sprink-
led liberally with the forebodings
of 1984-style repression.
Parsons, who is charged with
striking engineering Prof. John
Young during a demonstration
against a General Electric recruit-
er Feb. 18, was summarily expelled
from the literary college in March,
precipitating a major controversy
on campus.
The suspension was revoked
when 300 students staged a sit-in
in the LSA Bldg. and a new wit-
ness came forward causing then-
Dean William Hays, who had or-
dered the disciplinary action, to
say he was "no longer sure" that
Parsons was guilty as charged.
Ever since then, University of-
ficials have been itching to get
their hands on Parsons - by
whatever means necessary.
In the meantime, however, Par-
sons has graduated from the Uni-
versity. He has also been convict-
ed of the assault charge in civil
court and has served out his sent-
ence.
Even for an administration bent
on revenge, it would have seemed
reasonable to give up on the case
because Parsons is no longer un-
der its jurisdiction.
But the administration seems
insistent on having its way, and
has ordered a fact-finding hear-
ing before an "impartial" hearing
officer appointed by President
Robben Fleming. The case would
then presumably be handled by
the literary college administrative
board, which, at the time of the
alleged offense, was empowered by
the University to handle such
cases.
THERE ARE A NUMBER of
serious objections to the current
proceedings against Parsons --
issues all members of the Uni-
versity community should ser-
iously consider if they are truly
interested in upholding the tradi-
tional tenents of Anglo-American
jurisprudence:
r Parson's case has already
been handled by the civil courts,
and there is no reason why the
University should add to his pun-
isument. Students certainly should
not be punished more severely or
in more ways than any other=
citizen.
*.The hearing officer procedure

was never used or even discussed
on campus until well after the
alleged act took place. Use of this
procedure in Parsons' case is
parallel to trying an individual un-
der a law- passed after the act
was committed - a process ban-
ned by the U.S. Constitution.
* Parsons has not been told
under what rules he is being
charged. (Indeed, no one in the
University administration seems
quite sure on this point.) This un-
certainty constitutes an important
denial of Parsons' right to due
process.
* Of the many sets of Univer-
sity rules (e.g. the Regents' In-
terim Rules and those in the LSA
Faculty Code) only those approv-
ed by Student Government Coun-
cil have the approval of a repre-
sentative student government and
include the right of trial by a
jury of peers. The other regula-
tions and procedures are undemo-
cratic and should not be used.
*Non-academic offenses do not

constitute a reflection upon the
academic competence of .a stu-
dent and academic penalties like
suspension or expulsion should not
be allowed in such cases.
As a historical footnote, it is
interesting to note that the failure
of the literary college to make
their action against Parsons stick
last March has caused a major
ominous upheaval in University
disciplinary procedures.
APPARENTLY FRIGHTENED
by their inability to discipline any
student at will, the administra-
tion has re-oriented procedures
with the passage of the Interim
Rules, which allow the president
to appoint an "impartial" hearing
officer who will act as judge, jury
and executioner for accused stu-
dents.
By contrast, the present action
against non-student Parsons is
merely a joke, a collossal carica-
ture of an institution so deter-
mined to repress dissent that it
can't tell the students from the
"outside agitators."

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 76
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

Letters to the Editor1

Bulletin
To the Editor:
ALLAN F. SMITH, who has
reigned over the University's
schools and colleges as vice presi-
dent for academic affairs for five
years, died late last night in what
appeared to be a freak f i r e-
cracked explosion. He was 58.
Throngs of students and fa-
culty members filled the central
campus area only minutes later in
a joyous celebration marked by
encores of "Ding Dong the Witch
is Dead."
At one point, the crowd surged
toward the Law Library and rip-
ped down and burned a collage of
pictures of the late vice president
which has hung on its walls since
he took office. Smith had served
previously as dean of the law-
school.
With President Robben Fleming
and Vice Presidents Wilbur Pier-
pont, Stephen Spurr, Michael Rad-
dock and Fidele Fauri all out of
town, the mantle of the acting
presidency fell immediately upon
Acting Vice President for Stu-
dent Services Barbara Newell.
At a press conference early this

morning, Newell announced that
the University would immediately
break all ties with the Defense
Department and with corpora-
tions.
Instead, she said, the University
would be converted into a mam-
mouth complex including a huge
bookstore, a black student center,
a child care center. University of-
fices and facilities will be open-
ed for the use of peace groups and
left-wing revolutionary move-
ments.
"Ding dorig the witch is dead,"
said Acting President Newell,
"Power to the People!"
-Gordon Bradley
Aug. 5
Letters- to the Editor should
be mailed to the Editorial Di-
rector or delivered to Mary
Rafferty in the Student Pub-
lications business office in the
Michigan Daily building. Let-
ters should be typed, double-
spaced and normally should not
exceed 250 words. The Editorial
Directors reserve the right to
edit all letters submitted.

FOR SALE
BAILBOAT-14' Pintail sloop, fiberglas
hull, aluminum mast, dacron sails,
complete trailer, $825 firm. 971-6015.
6B63
WOODEN EASEL, $24 new, will nego-
tiate. Call Jan weekdays, 1-5, 764-
0351. 7B61
2 GOOSE LAKE 3-day tickets, $10 each.
769-0612. 8B62
LEAVING COUNTRY-VM stereo table
model with mahagony cabinet. Very
good sound. $35. Olivetti portable
typewriter with canvas case, excellent
condition. $25. Call 662-0348 evenings,
764-0510 mornings. BD71
GREAT SALE-Furniture, hand carved
antiques, beds, couch, chest, book
cases, clothes, dishes, 9x12 rugs, artist
supplies, reducing vibrator, much
more, Thurs. and Fri., noon 'til dark
behind 1404 W. Huron. 5B62
ADMIRAL Portable TV, 12 inch, instant
play, practically new, must sell to
study. $75. 769-7683 persistently. BD63
CONN TENOR SAX-New neck, good
condition, $175. 665-7282. 3B63
MUST SELL immediately, handsome
wood console Westinghouse stereo.
Any offer considered. Alice, 761-1042.
4B61
HELP WANTED
AA BLUES FESTIVAL needs ticket
takers for the gate for the festival,
Aug. 7, 8, 9. $1.75/hr. Please call 763-
1134, would prefer people who could
work the whole weekend. 29H61
SMALL CAMPUS office seeking full-
time permanent typist-receptionist.
665-2490 for interview appt. 27H64
AMERICAN Academic Environments,
cambridge, Mass., is a young company
marketing quality consumer design
products to retail outlets. We are now
recruiting for full time positions for
the fall season. Experience is desired,
and a car and willingness to travel is
necessary. For further information
contact the Student Employment
office. 25H63
URGENT-Foster family needed for 15-
yr.-old girl, ward of Juvenile Court.
Call 663-7860. Family in school con-
sultation project. 26H63
FINANCIAL Analysis-accounting part
time, begin Aug.-school year. Doc-
toral or grad student for social-eco-
nomic organization, financial systems
and statements. Call Students Inter-
national, 769-5790. 21H61
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
DUCATI ELITE, 200cc, 3500 miles, ex-
cellent condition, $300. 769-0992. 41Z63
HONDA 160, excellent cond., $250.665-
8249. 42Z64
'69 350 HONDA SCRAMBLER-Excellent
condition, owned by Honda mechanic.
6-12 p.m., 662-9738. ZD71
BULTACO LOBITO 100cc, great street
and woods. 663-1815 dinnertime. 40Z61
HONDA 750, good machine, between 6-
7:30 p.m. 109 N. Thayer. 39Z61
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 2671
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS NEEDED to British Columbia,
gas and driving, Aug. 8. 662-0309.
8G61
RIDERS OR RIDE WANTED to NYC.
Share usuais. Aug. 17th or 18th. Cal
764-0510 mornings, 662-0348 evenings.
GD68
DRIVING to San Francisco around
August 21, need rider. 668-9851. 6G62
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS?
VISIT
us
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims .,....=6.50
Button-F*y... .. 6.50
Traditional..... 6.98
Bells ..... .... 7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS .. ...2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's.. , ... 6.98
Nuvo's ........... 8.50

Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam's Store
122'E. Washington

FOR RENT
HOUSE TO SUBLET fall term to fac-
ulty family. Furnished 3 bdrm. Rea-
sonable rent. For more info. call 663-
8230 evenings. 8C66
5 OR 6 MAN modern apt. for fall, 3
bdrms., bi - level, dishwasher, 10
closets, parking. Louise, 663-7464. 5C61
WEST SIDE-Ground level unfurnish-
ed apt. for 1 person. Util. paid in
exchange for lawn mowing / snow
shoveling. Call 665-0208. 10C62
ROOMS FOR MEN ONLY
No cooking, nicely furn. $60-75/mo.
668-6906. 1346 Geddes. 47Ctc
FURNISHED, spacious 1 and 2 bdrm.
apts., all conveniences, air condition-
ed, undercover parking. 1-864-3052.
50Ctc
FURN., MOD. 2 BDRMS.
911 S. FOREST
near Hill St.
3-man, $77/ea. 4-man, $65/ea.
CALL 668-6906.
46Ct
NEED AN APARTMENT
AND/OR ROOMMATES?
MEET YOUR
MATCHMAKERS
Chris & Nancy . . .
Who will help you select your
modern, bi-level apt.
Several furnished 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments still available at con-
venient campus locations.
Dishwashers, vacuum cleaners, bal-
conies, 1% baths, air cond., park-
ing, laundry & storage facilities.
24 hour maintenance service.
CHARTER REALTY
665-8825
1335 S. University
9tc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. soCtc
ROOM FOR RENT-Furn. Call 761-5026
before 11 a.m. 2C63
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 15Ctc
LOVELY 2-bdrm. furn., prof. or couplt
preferred. $185. 668-6906. 49Ctc
2-MAN, 1 BDRM. modern apt, near hos-
pital, modern kitchen, A/C, balcony,
Aug. '70-Aug. '71. $190. 769-4269 after
4. 7C66
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets, storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest. Ctc
STATE STREET MANOR
1111 S. State Street
2, 3, or 4 man large apts.
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
1-864-3852
1-353-7389
Ctc
Campus-Hospital
Fall OccupanCy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTM ENTS
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
38tce
SANS SOUCI APTS.
' Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop

4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
s10t

FOR RENT
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Wall St.-Furnished, new, modern
1 and 2 bedrooms available. 1-864-
3852. l Ctc
4-MAN
ON CAMPUS
711 ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $260/
mo. Featuring:
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36C71
TWO BEDROOM, furnished unit, near
law and business schools. Please call
Professional Management Assoc., 769-
4227. 4Ctc
CHARMING HOUSE for rent, furnished.
668-9851. 6C62
REFRIGERATOR on floors. Single
rooms, 428 Cross St. 663-3886. 37C62
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Several beautifully decorated, fur-
nished, 2-bedroom, bi-level apts.
still available for fall semester.
Dishwashers A Vacuum cleaners
112 Baths 0 Air-Cond. 9 Balconies
Parking 9 Laundry and Storage
facilities 0 Excellent sound con-
ditioning.
Call the Resident Manager at
761-1717 or 665-8825 or stop in
at the lobby office 12 noon to 6 p.m.
daily, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
761-1717
llCtc
OLD BUT NICE-1 bdrm. furn., single
or couple only, $160. 668-6906. 48Ctc
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40/
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
27Ctc
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2, 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30Ctc
APARTMENT LOCATOR--$12.50, 1, 2,
and 3 bdrm. fail apts. on and off
campus. 1217 S. Univ. 761-7764. 40Ctc
LOOK I NG?
Why not tell people what you are
looking for? Tell themcheaply, yet
effectively in Daily classifieds. 764-
0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. DU
WANTED TO RENT
YUGOSLAV assistant professor wishes
apt. near campus to share from
9/1/70 to 1/1/71 with American male.
764-0383. 32L62
SENIOR WANTS ROOM in house. Now
or in fall. Call Elaine collect, 422-
0761. 31L61
USED CARS
1965 OPEL, tan, 28 mpg., 47,000 miles,
exc. transportation, best offer over
$425. 663-1401. 47N67

ROOMMATES WANTED
MALE GRAD roommates needed to fill
4-man, 2 bdrm. apart., $75/mo. Call
763-3244 or 665-4393. 44Y63
4TH GIRL NEEDED for fall apt, in old
house, own room. 662-9738, 6-12 p.m.,
$62.50/mo. YDtc
SENIOR WISHES to share apt. or
house. Own room preferred. Call
Andy, 663-8138. YD63
FOURTH MALE needed for apt. in fall
on campus next to Women's Athletic
Bldg. Call Don, 1-447-3222 after 5.
41Y62
WANTED-1 or 2 girls to fill apartment.
Call 761-8693, Barb/Marj. Be persis-
tent. 42Y65
2 GIRLS for mod. A/C, furn. 4-man
apt., campus location, $80/mo. Call
761-1409 or 663-6091 after 5:30. 43Y64
FEMALE GRAD needed to share 1-
bdrm. apt. with same. $90/mo., park-
ing, Packard near State. Nancy, 1-
647-4862. 39Y61
NEED FOURTH GIRL for apartment in
fall. Call 474-2685 before 4 p.m. 40Y61
WANTED-2 or 3 girls to fill apartment.
769-3130 after 4:30. 32Ytc
4TH FEMALE Roommate wanted for
fall apt., good location. CHEAP. Call
Mary after 5:30 p.m. at 769-0118. 38Y62
BUSINESS SERVICES
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Ptc
MULTIPLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Pronpt Service
CALL 485-2086
Jtc
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Unavailable instruments, repairs and
instructions - 209 S. State. 665-8001.

A
C
A
B
F
A
k
L

,ti44eay Chaxei
AmPla

fn: Shadow over Latin America

TPHERECENT hijacking of a 747 jumbo
jet to Havana and Premier Castro's
presence when it arrived at the airport
have once again focused world attention
on Cuba. One offshoot of the whole af-
fair has been the suggestion in s o m e
quarters 'that the United States could
circumvent many hijackings by "recog-
nizing" Cuba.
What this argument doesn't realize is
that "recognition" of Cuba - establish-
ment of diplomatic and commercial re-
lations - would be nothing short of a
disaster for U.S. prestige and credibility
around the world.
TO UNDERSTAND THE enormity of
such an action it is necessary to con-
sider the traditional role of the United
States in Latin America. Until 1959 the
Cuban government cooperated very nice-
ly with what might be called the "Ameri-
can Plan" for Latin American countries
(AmPlan for short).
According to AmPlan the purpose of a
L a t i n American country is to provide
cheap labor and investment opportuni-
ties for American businesses. To insure
that labor is willing to work for close to
starvation wages, AmPlan dictates that
the unemployment rate should be ap-
proximately 25 per cent.
Another AmPlan directive is that the
limited resources of the latin country be
used to build a lavish and modern cap-
ital city. A modern capital serves several
useful purposes. One of these is of course
to provide the Americans who own and

operate the businesses with a comfortable
headquarters. Another purpose is to ac-
comodate the tourists, who are a valu-
able income source to the latin countries,
and would not be expected to stay in the
hovels which serve as housing for people
outside the capital city.
A final and most important AmPlan
principle is that a small number of na-
tives 4e allowed to enjoy the benefits
which accrue to the American owners of
the country. It would naturally look very
suspicious to have Americans, .at least
visibly, in control of every phase of -a
latin country's life. These rich natives -
in government and business -- can al-
ways be counted on to boost and support
the presence of Americans in their coun-
try.
CUBA, UNTIL 1959, was a model latin
country with respect to AmPlan instruc-
tions. The U.S., therefore, did not espec-
ially welcome or see any need for the
massive uprising which swept Fidel Cas-
tro into power New Year's Day 1959. The
U.S. State Department, however, grace-
fully accepted the situation and hoped.
t h e revolution wouldn't change things
too much.
Unfortunately, the revolution did be-
gin to change things. Large land holdings
were broken up, telephone service was
expanded, medical care was made avail-
able free of charge to everyone, and rents
were reduced. Although the U.S. would
send planes to firebomb the Cuban su-
gar fields, and drop propaganda leaflets,

the Cuban revolution continued to make
irritatingreforms which flew in the face
of every AmPlan tenet.
THE LAST STRAW CAME at the be-
ginning of July, 1960. At that time the
Cuban government took over the man-
agement of three United States oil re-
fineries which had refused to refine So-
viet crude oil. Castro justified the inter-
vention by saying: "What is the differ-
ence whether the oil comes from Vene-
zuela or Russia or Timbuctoo? After all,
our government having purchased it, it.
becomes the property of the nation and
refusal of these foreign companies to pro-
cess it amounts to a challenge of our au-
thority and law."
The U.S. government, however, was not
misled by the Cuban premier's rhetoric,
and promptly cut off Cuba's subar quota.
Since 86 per cent of Cuba's export was.
sugar, and the majority of it went to the
United States, a U.S. refusal to buy su-
gar could well be expected to topple the
Castro regime.
Unfortunately, the Soviet government
offered to buy the sugar which the Unit-
ed States had refused, and the Castro re-
gime was still afloat.
Meanwhile, Castro was more than un-
happy by what he saw as an attempt to
destroy his regime and the Cuban econ-
omy. In retaliation for what he termed
"American economic aggression," he be-
gan to expropriate American industries
--something that had not been previous-
ly done.

Some Americans were upset by the Cu-
ban government taking over U.S. busi-
nesses, and Vice President Nixon reflect-
ed this feeling on Oct. 18 when he told a
cheering American Legion convention in
Miami Beach, "We will very promptly
take the strongest possible economic
measures to counter the economic ban-
ditry being practiced by this (Castro's)
regime against ouf country and our citi-
zens."
The next day the U.S. ordered an em-
bargo on all exports to Cuba except for
certain foodstuffs and medicines. The ac-
tion was in conformity with the Export
Control Act Jin which Congress stated:
"It is the policy of the United States to
use export controls . . . to exercise the
necessary vigilance over exports from the
standpoint of their significance to the
national security.""
AND THERE THE situation stands to
this day. The United States neither
trades nor conducts diplomatic relations
with Cuba. Our only contact is through
occassional CIA-sponsored guerrilla in-
vasions and airplane hijackings.
It is important - at least so long as
Cuba maintains its present economic and
social organization - that our relations
with Cuba be confined to those presently
existing. Cuba must realize that until it
subscribes to the AmPlan program, and
until it realizes, as -does the rest of the
world, that the Caribbean is an American
lake, the U.S. will continue to ignore it,
commercially and diplomatically.

MARTIN classical guitar, good cond.
1964 FORD Stn. Wag., 9 Pass., radio, For further information, 761-7432.
A/C. Best offer. 665-5728. 48Ntc 17X62

FORD, 1963 Galaxie hardtop, air, origi-
nal owner, very little rust, good run-
ner, best offer takes. 434-0392 after
5 or weekend. 49N65
FORD SPRINT V-8 convert. All-power,
auto., deluxe interior, perfect. 662-
7713. 46N64
PORSCHE 1964 voupr, excellent con-
dition, new tires and radio, $2100 or
best offer. 769-7549 after 5:00. 45N63

RECORDS!
Oldies! 20,000 in Stock. Send 35c
for 2,000 listing catalog. Mail Or-
ders Filled. RECORD CENTER,
1895 W. 25th-Cleve., Ohio. Record
Tapes. 31X1
PETS AND SUPPLIES

FREE - BLACK KITTENS. Half Sia-
mese, friendly. 482-0492 after 5. 19T61

n

I

Se
f or or
"the ultimate in cam pus living"
0 delux one-two-three bedroom apartments

* garbage disposals.
locked storage-
! resident manager

* fully furnished and
* private undergrour
* 24-hr. emergency r

each apartment equipped with its own burgla

--N

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