100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 06, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-08-06
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page S

t

--OTH°E MICHIGAN. DAILY

gY Thursday, A-gust,6, 1970 TD

"7tursday, Augusf6, 1970

I

THE MlCH'1{#AN DAILY

* *
~ -
news briefs .0
By The Associated Press
THE HOUSE tentatively approved yesterday a $55,000 ceil-
ing on subsidy payments to producers of cotton, wheat and feed
grains after beating back a move to cut it lower.
A non-record voice vote affirmed the position taken by the
House Agriculture Committee and endorsed by President Nixon. It
is subject to a possible roll call vote later.
TWO MILITANT PROTESTANT ORGANIZATIONS in Bel-
fast, Northern Ireland announced yesterday they will defy a gov-
ernment ban and march in Londonderry - the city where Ul-
ster's bloody religious fighting began a year ago this month.
The Protestant Unionist Association said it expected 5,000 en-
thusiasts to rally and commemorate the 289th anniversary of Lon-
donderry's victory over the Roman Catholic forces of King James II
in a parade Aug. 17.
The Ulster Protestant Volunteers also declared their defiance of
the ban on parades in this tense British province.
* * *
INFORMANTS SAID yesterday that the United States and
South Vietnam are waging an intensive air and ground offensive
along a 200-mile stretch of the Laotian border in an effort to cut
off troop infiltration and supply routes.
The U.S. role, sources reported, is an intensified B52 bombing
campaign in the Laotian panhandle.
MICHIGAN REPERTORY
---university players---

Only 21 states show acceptance
of 18-year-old vote measure

Kenned
cirested

WASHINGTON () -- Fewer than half the
states have met Atty. Gen. John Mitchell's dead-
line for taking steps to give 18-year-olds the vote.
The-Justice Department said yesterday only
21 of the 48 states now having higher voting-age
minimums have indicated they will allow 18-year-
old- voting without a court test of the new Voting
Rights Act.
Texas and Oregon already have presented pe-
titions to the Supreme Court asking that it ban
voting by 18-year-olds under the new act.
Both backers and opponents of the 18-year-
old vote are hopeful there will be a final ruling on
the provision's constitutionality before it becomes
effective next Jan. 1.
Mitchell sent letters to the states on July 16
seeking written assurances of compliance with the
new law and setting Aug. 8 as the deadline for re-
plies.
A compilation of replies showed 21 states have
said they would comply with the age provision
without awaiting a court test, five said they would
not, five sought more time to respond, five are

awaiting outcomes of court tests and two gave in-
definite responses. Ten states did not reply.
In addition, the Justice Department expects
between three and six states to defy the provis-
ion of the act which bans literacy and good-char-
acter poll tests for voters. Eight of 14 states with
the tests said they would be eliminated.
Action against recalcitrant states on the 18-
year-old voting, literacy tests and possibly a new
requirement f o r uniform residency periods in
presidential elections is expected at both the Dis-
trict Court and Supreme Court levels.
Although somewhat less controversial t h a n'
t h e 18-year-old voting, suspension of literacy
tests is perhaps the most pressing issue confront-
ing the federal government because that provis-
ion took effect June 22.
Of the three states which indicated they would
defy the ban on poll tests, only Arizona said so
unequivocally. New Hampshire and Wyoming
have indicated they would not comply and Idaho,
North Carolina and Vermont were among the
states that have not responded.

HYANNIS PORT, Mass. (P) -
Two 16-year-old Kennedy cous-
ins--Robert Kennedy Jr. and R.
Sargent S h r i v e r III - were
charged Tuesday with mari-
juana offenses and were ordered
to appear in court today.
Kennedy is the son of the late
U.S. senator from New York
and former U.S. attorney gen-
eral. Shriver is the son of- the
Kennedy in-law who stepped
down last March as U.S. am-
bassador to France.
Parents of both issued state-
ments expressing distress over
the charges, which include ju-
venile delinquency by reason of
being present where narcotics
were kept and illegal possession
of marijuana and conspiracy.
Ethel Kennedy, whose hus-
band was slain while campaign-
ing in California in June 1968,
said:
"Naturally I was distressed to
learn last night that my son has
been charged with having been
in possession of marijuana on
the 10th of last month.
"This is of course a matter
for the authorities to decide. But

Bc
al
Wi
fo
sia
de
ou
wi
ju
He
ar
M
to
in
fa.
su
th
ni
ou
ba
ne
in(
Th
at
Fi
tal

TONIGHT

peter nichols'
JOE EGG
PERFORMANCES THRU SAT., AUG. 8
Lydia iilendelssohn Theatre 8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $1.50, $2.00, $2.50 Ph. 668-6300

Student Mobilization Committee
NOON BRALL
ON fIAG AUG. 6
SPEAKERS WILL INCLUDE:
From Detroit SMC, MIKE SMITH, the lawyer who defended the Fort Jackson
Eight, and RODOLFO RODRIGUEZ, from the Movimiento Pro Independencia
(MOVEMENT FOR PUERTO RICAN INDEPENDENCE)
Tentatively, speeches are also expected from Assiz Essa of the Arab Students
Union,and by representatives of the Black Students Association at Eastern
Michigan University, the UAW, and AFSCME.
WORKSHOPS-THURS., AUG. 6, 7:30-9:30
Workshops will be held in the Student Activities Building by the following
groups: The Michigan Council to Repeal the Draft; SMC; the International
Socialists; the Anarchists Coalition; Women's Liberation. There will also be
a group discussing the heroin trade in Indochina, and its relation to the War.
Tentatively planned are workshops involving the Movement for a New Con-
gress and AFSCME.
At 7:30 on the first floor of the SAB there will be a general meeting with a
short presentation by each group, after which there will be individual work-
shops held on the 3rd floor of the SAB.
U.S. OUT OF INDOCHINA
HIROSHIMA-NAGASAKI AUG. 6-AUG. 9

-Associateu rress
Groups of summer visitors and newsmen gather on streets leading to the Kennedy compound in
Hyannis Port yesterday awaiting developments after news of Robert Kennedy Jr., 16, and Sargent
Shriver III, 17, who were involved in a drug raid. The two boys were among 17 persons seized in raids
by police in the Hyannis Port area.

3020 Washtenow Ph. 434-1782
Box Office Open 6:30

2nd WEEK
SHOW TIMES
TODAY & FRIDAY
7-9
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
1-3-5-7-9

Tension mounts in
A rab countries

ii

THEY SET OUT TO ROB A BANK ...
AND DAMN NEAR

WON A WAR INSTEAD!

(

. . . . . . . . . .

I

Well, here it is! "Kelly's Heroes" has
finally reached your big, big screen
and folks it's a bomb. Seriously,
though, there are some really super
tars -in this movie, for instance Clint
Eastwood from "Hang 'Em Low"
fna nr .finrl2 .g Sinlr d frn

:::>

-..

I= --s~~fr4

I,-'ATRE
1214 S. University
DIAL 8-6416

OPEN 6:45
Feature Promptly At
7 P.M. & 9 P.M.

I

I

I

By The Associated Press
Unrest mounted in the Arab world
over the U.S. Middle East peace plan
yesterday. Iraq stepped up its attacks
on Egypt for accepting the proposal and
rival Palestine guerrilla groups clashed
in Jordan over Cairo's stand.
An Iraqi spokesman even went so far
as to accuse President Gamal Abdel Nas-
ser of Egypt of making a political blunder
Police clash
with blacks
in Lima, 0.
LIMA, Ohio (/P)-Sporadic racial vio-
lence erupted last night over the slaying
of a black woman and 350 National
Guardsmen were called to help restore
order.
Police using an armored truck for pro-
tection broke into a Black Panther head-
quarters but found it empty.
A policeman and a sheriff's deputy were
among at least three persons wounded
by gunshots in separate incidents.
City police and sheriff's deputies from
four counties surrounded after police said,
snipers fired on police cars in the area.
One fire bomb was hurled at a police
car, officers said.
City officials asked for the guardsmen
after they said violence appeared to grow
during the evening despite a curfew and
an emergency ban on weapons.
Deputy Sheriff C h a r 1 e s Martin was
wounded by a shotgun blast and Bob
Croft, a Dayton television newsman, was
hit by pellets while pulling Martin to
safety. An unidentified person had un-
determined injuries.
Other injuries reported were to three
policemen duing an incident in which
Christine Rick, a resident of the pre-
dominantly black area, was shot to death
by a policeman, police said.
Police said they had arrested one
sniper.
Several police cruisers were punctured
by snipers' bullets, officers said, but no
one was reported hit.
Mayor Christian P. Morris declared a
state of emergency in this northwestern
Ohio city of 52,000 and imposed an over-
night curfew after the disorders broke
out at dusk.
All off-duty police, firemen and Allen
County sheriff's deputies were called to
duty.

that led to the Arab defeat in the 1967
war with Israel.
The dispute cast a shadow over the
military strategy conference of defense
ministers of five Arab states in Tripoli.
Iraq boycotted the meeting.
Two leading Arab guerrilla groups
vowed last night to thwart implementa-
tion of a Middle East cease-fire even by
attacking U.N. peacekeeping forces.
The threat was issued in Tripoli, Libya,
where defense ministers of five Arab
states met for a military strategy con-
ference as unrest mounted in the Arab
world over the U.S. peace proposal.
Although uninvited to the conference,
representatives of Al Fatah and the Pale-
stine Popular Struggle Front showed up
in Tripoli, held a joint news conference
and declared their groups were prepared
"to force U.N. observers off the cease-fire
line to keep up the fight against Israel."
Meanwhile in Washington, U.S. offic-
ials said they will propose to Israel and
Egypt that they police any Mideast cease-
fire themselves, giving the United Na-
tions only a token role.
A large Iraqi delegation, which arrived
in Moscow on Tuesday, attended a
luncheon yesterday at which Soviet De-
puty Premier Kirill Mazurov voted sup-
port for "a fair political settlement."
At the United Nations, the chief U.N.
delegates of the Big Four powers met
yesterday and pronounced developments
"favorable for the resumption" of U.N.
envoy Gunnar Jarring's peace mission.
The action paved the way for U.N.
Secretary-General U Thant to activate
a new effort by Jarring, the Swedish am-
bassador to Moscow who attempted to
mediate the dispute after the 1967 war.
It was the first meeting of the U.S.,
Soviet, British and French representatives
since Egypt, Jordan and Israel accepted
the U.S. proposal.
After the three-hour session, U.S. Am-
bassador Charles W. Yost announced:
"The representatives of the four powers
discussed the latest developments, which
are favorable for the resumption of Am-
bassador Jarring's mission."
Meanwhile, Israel made it clear that it
will keep up the fight until Jarring's
peace mission gets under way.
Israeli planes swept across two fronts,
striking Arab guerrilla bases in Jordan
and Egyptian military targets along the
Suez Canal, the military command in Tel
Aviv reported.
In Amman, commando sources said two
guerrilla groups, one supporting Nasser's
approval of the U.S. plan and the other
opposing it, fought in North Jordan dur-,
ing the night.

Celia's victim

2ND SMASH WEEK!
"BRILLIANTLY BITCHY" -TIME
"NOTHING SHORT OF BRILLIANT"
-JUDITH CRIST
"SCREAMINGLY FUNNY"
-JOYCE HABER
Spend a marvelous evening with eight of the boys:

ramuuu aao Lfnaa v

'IM. A. S. .'"(whoopee)-.
Filmed in beautiful
Yugoslavia by'midg-
ets. This'one should
have been auctioned
off by MGM 20
years ago. So do
me afavor, fans...
stay -home.

rln ivaU rUrv

Michael Hughes, of Aransas Pass, Texas, was out of t
hit the Texas gulf coast Monday. He returned to tl
(background) completely destroyed and his family :
his wife's purse. The body of his 18-year-old son was
and 14-year-old daughter are still missing.
Cambridge police
30 rioters with

Art

_

HKeliy's
OPEN ,1 P.M.
NODTESPECIAL
SHOW TIMES
1:15-3:45
6:15-8:45

Mart Crowley's
"T6111If 0CV IN Tilt E ANIU
Is NOT a Musical!
Deluxe Color

At State & Liberty Sts.
DIAL 662-6264

MGM Presents
A Katzka-Loeb Production
starring
CLINT EASTWOOD
TELLY SAVALAS
DON RICKLES
CARROLL O'CONNOR
and
DONALD SUTHERLAND
in "KELLY'S HEROES"
Metrocolor
L

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. () - Some 300
young radicals stoned automobiles and
buses, made targets of firemen, and
erected a barricade near Harvard Square
last night but were driven off by police
using tear gas.
The disturbance broke out shortly be-
fore midnight. Less than an hour earlier
city manager Joseph Corcoran declared
a city wide curfew after receiving infor-
mation through private sources that a
riot might occur.
There were no reports of looting and
no immediate reports of arrests. Newsmen
at the scene said the disturbance began
when the dissidents rocked Massachu-

setts Avenue
square and bo
said at least
several buses
pelted fireme
About fiv
throwing bei
cluding the
moved in dis
sidents broke
away from
attempt to :
least one aul
fires were a
mon, just nc

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan