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August 05, 1970 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-08-05

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Wednesday, August 5, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Uhe £frijwgn Daitij
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the'
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michiaon Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 1970 News Phone 764-0552

JAMES WECHSLEtR.
Answer to lonel antxities.?

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 76
1Noon Deadlne Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

Stop hijackings by
recogniZing Cuba
THE ACT OF hijacking an airplane in the United States
has become so passe that it is not even given a second
glance unless it involves some unusual circumstances
such as in the case of last weekend's hijacking of a 747
which prompted Cuban Premier Fidel Castro to journey
to Havana's airport to see the largest plane ever to land
in Cuba.
The U.S. government and the various airline com-
panies have adopted several different policies in the hope
of stopping skyj ackings. All have proven to be failures.
There is one sure fire method of reducing the num-
ber of air hijackings that has not been brought into use
yet. The Nixon administration has thus far continued the
policies of prior administrations and refused to restore
diplomatic relations with Cuba.
The government is certainly entitled to its disap-
proval of the Castro regime, but that is not a reason to
refuse to deal with it. It is not a secret that the United
States government dislikes the Soviet Union, but this does
not deter the presence of envoys there and the carrying
on of various types of business.
Recognition of the Castro government would hope-
fully lead to a development of various types of liaisons
between the two neighbors. One of which would undoubt-
edly be the commencement of commercial airline service
between Cuba and the United States.
Such an action would eliminate the prime cause for
the bulk of airplane hijackings, thus greatly reducing
thpir number.
-PHILIP HERTZ
Choosing sides
THE DIRECT CONNECTIONS between the University
and the military-industrial complex a r e becoming
more apparent, the latest development being the hiring
of a General Motors middle level executive, Chandler W.
Matthews, as comptroller.
Matthews has spent the past two years inLatin Amer-
ica helping GM exploit Venezuela.
This fall the United Auto Workers may strike GM for
better working conditions and higher wages. A state-wide
organization to support the auto workers is forming and
will force universities to choose sides in the up-coming
struggle.
Is there any wonder which side this University will
be on?
-JIM FORRESTER

IT IS A TIME of fraud; even
those cornflakes- a jman has
been eating for so many thousands
of breakfasts turn out to be nutri-
tionally suspect. The "Southern
strategy" that did not exist, as we
were told so often, is now said to
be under reappraisal; the reces-
sion that never was-according to
official accounts--is now described
as gently receding.
Now comes the great deception
of the District of Columbia's "anti-
crime" bill, packaged as an answer
to your lonely anxieties on dimly-
lit streets and in unguarded homes,
the dawn of a new age in which
the lawless will at last concede
that their number is up, a model
for all states where "coddling" is
allegedly the basic sin.
It was widely noted at the time
of Senate and House approval of
the bill 'that legislators facing re-
election this fall generally sup-
pressed their doubts about the
Constitutionality-and rationality
-of key provisions in the measure.
They were apparently persuaded
that a negative vote would be as
hazardous as a condemnation of
motherhood (or, in 1970, sister-
hood). Those who had the courage
to say nay were too few, but they
were a distinguished company.
THE CRUCIAL POINT - sub-
stantively and symbolically - in
the Mitchell program is the con-
cept of "preventive detention."
Obviously it represents a total
reversal of the doctrine of the pre-
sumption of innocence that dif-
ferentiates free societies from
despotism. Under this provision a
defendant may be jailed without
bail for up to 60 days if a judge
concludes, after a hearing, that he
"might" commit a crime if re-
leased.
Perhaps it is old-fashioned to
object-as such conservatives as
Sen. Ervin of North Carolina did
-that this procedure would ex-
pose innocents to capricious in-
ternment (and even thereby trans-
form some of the aggrieved into
hostile outcasts). But even if that
consideration is deemed "ritual-
istic," an epithet now recklessly
applied to those who retain a rev-
erence for the Bill of Rights, the
detention gambit is a mindless
monstrosity in the light-or dark-
ness-of the stifling congestion of
both our courts and our jails. The
result of the "preventive" proce-
dure must inevitably be a multi-
plication of chaos in both courts
and prisons.
Other controversial provisions
include the "no-knock" authoriza-
tion if there is "reason to believe"
that evidence inside a home may
be destroyed. New York already
has such a law; it seems to have
had no large-scale consequences,
possibly because district attorneys
in this area are not prone to abuse
the power. Its enactment has ugly

overtones, however, for black citi-
ztns in regions where there are
long histories of unrestrained po-
lice intrusion.
The saddest fact is that the
move is being advertised as a sig-
nificant secret weapon against
crime. it isn't. And it is a sur-
render to the delusion that the use
of ancient totalitarian forms can
provide serenity and security.
WHAT IS REALLY at stake in
these arguments is the iissue of
whether the country will or.ce
again turn away from the search
for serious, costly solutions by ac-
cepting cheap, demagogic answers.
That is the gap between Mitchell
and his predecessors, Ramsey
Clark, whom Mitchell once re-
proached for an undue concern
with the "sociology" of crime
rather than the punishment of
criminals.
That happens to be the heart of
the matter. Desperate drug-ad-
dicts will not suddenly abandon
crime when they learn that they
may be subject to "preventive de-
tention"--nor will they emerge
from prison as constructive, cheer-
ful citizens as long as there are
no massive treatment and rehabili-
tation programs. Parents who see
drugs peddled to their kids on the
streets-while cops look the other
way-will derive no solace from
the news that the laws are being
"toughened." The rate of recidiv-
ism that disgraces our jammed,
obsolete prison system will not be
improved by the prospect of ad-
ditional crowding.
These are not new propositions,
but they remain the valid ones,
and they are being obscured by

the extravagant deceptions herald-
ing the code of the primitives. We
are in danger of succumbing to the
madness that there is a simple,
positive ratio between public safe-
ty and the overpopulation of
squalid jails.
ONE OF THOSE Congressmen
facing* reelection who dared to
vote against the Mitchell formula
is Rep. Allard Lowenstein. His op-
ponent in Nassau's Fifth District
-State Sen. Norman F. Lent-has
predictably accused Lowenstein of
"softness" toward criminals and
apathy about "the rights of help-
less citizens." No doubt others who
stood with Lowenstein against the
rampage of unreason will be ex-
posed to similar frenzy. As Sen.
Ervin warned: "I hear the siren
voice of that old devil, political
expediency, whisper in my ear:
'You better vote for the D.C. bill
because it's a law-and-order bill.'
It's not politically sagacious, not
politically wise, to vote against a
law-and-order bill."
Lowenstein's vote has enhanced
the national importance of his
fight. Conceivably his constituency
will be sufficiently sensitive and
sophisticated to discern the "anti-
crime" fakery and folly that
thickens the oppressive summer
smog.
s New York Post
The Editorial Page of The
Michigan Daily is open to any-
one who wishes - to submit
articles. Generally speaking, all
articles should be less than
1,000 words.

FOR RENT
5 OR 6 MAN modern apt. for fall, 3
bdrms., bi - level, dishwasher, 10
closets, parking. Louise, 663-7464. 5C61
ROOMS FOR MEN ONLY-
No cooking, nicely furn. $60-75/mo.
668-6906. 1346 Geddes. 47Ctc
FURNISHED, spacious 1 and 2 bdrm.
apts., all conveniences, air condition-
ed, undercover parking. 1-864-3052.
50Ctc
FURN., MOD. 2 BDRMS.
911 S. FOREST
near Hill St.
3-man, $77/ea. 4-man. $65/ea.
CALL 668-6906.
46Ctc
ROOM FOR RENT
Call 662-5456 persistently.
1C60
2 BDRM. FURN. units. on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Ctc
NO LEASE
Couple wants someone to take extra
bedroom and share modern apt. $75/
mo. Call Karen Johnson, 769-7900 or
761-0263. 3067
ROOM FOR RENT-Furn. Call 761-5026
before 11 a.m. 2063
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 15Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
10Ctc
LOVELY 2-bdrm. furn., prof. or couplt
preferred. $185. 668-6906. 49Ctc
2-MAN, 1 BDRM. modern apt. near hos-
pital, modern kitchen, A/C, balcony,
Aug. '70-Aug. '71. $190. 769-4269 after
4. 7C66
CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.

FOR RENT
TWO BEDROOM, furnished unit, near
law and business schools. Please call
Professional Management Assoc., 769-
4227, 4Ctc
CHARMING HOUSE for rent, furnished.
668-9851. 6062
REFRIGERATOR on floors. Single
rooms, 428 Cross St. 663-3886. 37C62
OLD BUT NICE-1 bdrm. furn., single
or couple only, $160. 668-6906. 48Ctc
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 wall St.-Furnished, new, modern
efficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom available.
1-864-3852. 1Ctc
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40/
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
27Ctc
CHOICE APTS.
For Fal. 2, 3, and 4 man, closerto
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30tc
4-MAN
ON CAMPUS
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $260/
mo, Featuring:
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36071
APARTMENT LOCATOR-$12.50, 1, 2,
and 3 bdrm. fall apts. on and off
campus. 1217 S. Univ. 761-7764. 4Ctc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets, storage and parking,
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest. Ctc
STATE STREET MANOR
111 S. State Street
2, 3, or 4 man large apts.
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
1-864-3852
1-353-7389
Ctc
AVAIL. FOR SUMME & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825 llCtc
LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are
looking for? Tell them cheaply, yet
effectively in Daily classifieds. 764-
0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. lU
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
ROOMMATES WANTED
FOURTH MALE needed for apt. in fall
on campus next to Women's Athletic
Bldg. Call Don, 1-447-3222 after 5.
41Y62
WANTED-1 or 2 girls to fill apartment.
Call 761-8693, Barb/Marj. Be persis-
tent. 42Y65
4TH GIRL NEEDED for fall apt. in old
house, own room. 662-9738, 6-12 p.m.
YDtc
2 GIRLS for mod. A/C, furn. 4-man
apt., campus location, $80/mo. Call
761-1409 or 663-6091 after 5:30. 43Y64
FEMALE GRAD needed to share 1-
bdrm. apt. with same. $90/mo., park-
ing, Packard near State. Nancy, 1-
647-4862. 39Y61
NEED FOURTH GIRL for apartment in
fall. Cal 474-2685 before 4 p.m. 40Y61
WANTED-2 or 3 girls to fill apartment.
769-3130 after 4:30. 32Ytc
FEMALE GRADS seek two female
grad/prof. roommates for Fall. Call
761-7956, 761-4372 after six. 36Y60
4THFEMALE Roommate wanted for
fall apt., gooilocation. CHEAP. Call
Mary after 5:30 p m. at 769-0118. 38Y62
WANTED TO RENT
YUGOSLAV assistant professor wishes
apt. near campus to share from
9/1/70 to 1/1/71 with American male.
764-033. 32L62

SENIOR WANTS ROOM in house. Now
or in fall. Call Elaine collect, 422-
0761. 31L61
RESP. FRESHMAN. needs apartment
and roommates for fall and winter.
Doug Fachnie 764874. 30L60

LINES 1 day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1.55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9, 2.40
10 2.60
INCHES
1. 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 iG0.70

2 days
1.60
2.15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4.95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35
21.10

3 dovs
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55
31.40

UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES

4 dovs
3.00
4.05
4.05
4.65
6.35
7.20
7.90
8.70
9.30
9.30
17.85
25.50
33.45
41.40

5 days
3.65
4.85
5.90
6.90
7.85
8.85
9.75
10.65
11.35
11.35
21.75
31.15
40.95
51.15

6 days
4.20
5.65
6.90
8.05
9.25
10.40
11.45
12.60
13.60
13.30
25.40
36.65
48.30
60.50

Additional costs per day after six days.
Ads thato are 1 %/I, 212, 312, etc. inch size will be billed at the
average of the lower and higher inch rate.

HELP WANTED
SMALL CAMPUS office seeking full-
time permanent typist-receptionist.
665-2490 for interview appt. 27H64
AA BLUES FESTIVAL
NEEDS MALES AND FEMALES FOR
PSYCEDLIC RANGER WORK. Paid
day and night time work at Festival,
Aug. 7, 8, 9. Call 761-4897. 28H62
AMERICAN Academic Environments,
Cambridge, Mass., is a young company
marketing quality consumer design
products to retail outlets. We are now
recruiting for full time positions for
the fall season. Experience is desired,
and a car_ and willingness to travel is
necessary. For further information
contact the Student Employment
office. 25H63
URGENT-Foster family needed for 15-
yr.-old girl, ward of Juvenile Court.
Call 663-7860. Family in school con-
sultation project. 26H63
UNDERGRAD to help prof (in wheel-
chair) in exchange for room and
board. 761-9034 after 5. 22H60

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-One calico cat with red collar,
campus area. 662-3892. 35A62
Chocolate floppy eared Mongrel FOUND
hit at State and Packard. Contact
761-7284. AD6O

add
.60
.80
.95
1.15
1.30
1.45
1.55
1.70
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.40

C
C

761-7600

380tc

i

SANS SOUCI

APTS.

NIGHT EDITOR: ROB BIER

i

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NMIXXR(TY.

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.5-.

Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
2lcta
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS ?
VISIT
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims......6.50
Button-Fly .. ..6.50
Traditional.......6.98
Bells..... 7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS .. .. 2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's ... 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's.........6.98
Nuvo's........8.50
Over-7000 Pairs in Stock!
am Store
122 E. Washington

FINANCIAL Analysis-accounting part
time, begin Aug.-school year. Doc-
toral or grad student for social-eco-
nomic organization, financial systems
and statements. Call Students Inter-
national, 769-5790. 21H61
FOR SALE'
GREAT SALE-Furniture, hand carved
antiques, beds, couch, chest, book
cases, clothes, dishes, 9x12 rugs, artist
supplies, reducing vibrator, much
more, Thurs. and Fri., noon 'til dark
behind 1404 W. Huron. 5B62
ADMIRAL Portable TV, 12 inch, instant
play, practically new, must sell to
study. $75. 769-7683 persistently. BD63
CONN TENOR SAX-New neck, good
condition, $175. 665-7282. 3B63
MUST SELL immediately, handsome
wood console Westinghouse stereo.
Any offer considered. Alice, 761-1042.
4B61
UTILITY TRAILER fully enclosed box,
suitable for long-distance hauling,
light springs and shocks. 769-7864.
21360
BUSINESS SERVICES
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric,
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical,.24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Ptc
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
't'hesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Workt
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
Jice

USED CARS
FORD SPRINT V-8 convert. All-power,
auto., deluxe interior, perfect. 662-
7713. 46N64
'63 IMPALA, V-8, power steering, power
brakes, new top, Alabama car, no
rust, $525. 769-7864. 44N60
PORSCHE 1964 voupr, excellent con-
dition, new tires and radio, $2100 or
best offer. 769-7549 after 5:00. 45N63
1964 SUNBEAN Alpine, very good con-
dition. Call 761-5491, ask for John
or Greg. 42N60
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
'69 350 HONDA SCRAMBLER-Excellent
condition, owned by Honda mechanic,
6-12 p.m., 662-9738. ZD71
BULTACO LOBITO 100cc, great street
and woods. 663-1815 dinnertime. 40Z61
HONDA 750, good machine, between 6-
7:30 p.m. 109 N. Thayer. 39Z61
1948 INDIAN, 500cc, twin, rigid frame,
springer forks. original.Indian saddle
bags, best offer. 761-0745. ZD53
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26Z71
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING to San Francisco around
August 21, need rider. 668-9851. 6G62
NEED RIDE to Calif., weekend of Aug.
7, will share expenses and driving.
665-7220. 7G62
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
MARTIN classical guitar, good cond.
For further information, 761-7432.
17X62
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIOa_
Acoustic, electric instruments, acces-
sories, David lessons-repairs, Gibson,
Harmony. 209 S. State. 665-8001. 10-7
p.m. X
RADIO, TV, Hi-fi, car repair, Very rea-
sonable-even CHEAP! 769-6250. XD60
RECORDS!
Oldies! 20,000 in Stock. Send 35c
for 2,000 listing catalog. Mail Or-
ders Filled. RECORD CENTER,
1895 W. 25th-Cleve., Ohio. Record
Tapes. 31X1
PETS AND SUPPLIES
FREE - BLACK KITTENS. Half Sia-
mese, friendly. 482-0492 after 5.19T61
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND BOARD for 2 student girls,
linens, quiet area, $23, for fall. 549
4th it. 668-6647. 12E64

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#2 SCL
5(Pa6IY Oa tL
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SPAPT O
A61QX)'P

PARK
TERRACE
848 Tappan
at Oakland
Deluxe 1-2-3
Bedroom Apts.
See Tom or Bonnie Woods,
Apt. 10, 769-5014 or
aswering svce, 769-7779

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