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August 05, 1970 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-05
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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'Ar -

-41
Wednesday, August 5, 1970
U ,.

I

Wednesday, August 5, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I II

* * #1 6 e i~$ ?i.9 . ** -Z e ~~ '%A s4* .
:'wtiew
By1 The Associated Press
FOUR MORE CITIES were added yesterday to the govern-
ment's list of major metropolitan areas with substantial unem-
ployment of six per cent or more of the work force, bringing the
total to Z4 - highest in more than five years.
The latest cities of 50,000 or more population to win the dubious
distinction on the Labor Department's list were New Britain, Conn.;
South Bend, Ind.; Portland, Ore. - including Clark County, Wash.;
and the Springfield-Chicopee-Holyoke area of M~assachusetts.
In addition to the larger cities, the department said 27 smaller
labor market areas were added to the list of those with "substantial"
or "persistent" unemployment yesterday, bringing the total of such
areas to 575.
ChARGES OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION w e r e leveled
yesterday at Arkansas A & M, a predominantly black college.
A petition mailed to federal officials claimed that the college's
board and officials have maintained a racially segregated faculty and
staff in violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
The petition was signed by members of the Arkansas chapter of
Freedom, Inc., a Texarkana, Tex.-based organization formed more
than a year ago to promote freedom of choice as the method .to ach-
ieve school desegregation.
The complaint asks that Health, Education and Welfare offi-
cials wIthhold all federal funds or grants from the college until the
"racially discriminatory system" is eliminated "root and branch."
SIt also asked the Justice Department to initiate court action
against the college to "terminate the racial policies" and "to do it
now."
* * *
TWO EXECUTIVES OF THlE UNITED MINE WORKERS
were indicted yesterday on charges of filing false expense vouch-
ers and financial reports, and conspiracy.
Named in a four-count ndictment returned in U.S. District Co't
in Pittsburgh were UMW District 5 president Michael Budzanoski and
District 5 secretary-treasurer John Seddona.
The indictment charged Budzanoski and Seddon conspired with
four members of District 5's executive board to file false vouchers in
order to obtain funds from the union's bank account.
---un iverSity players--t s
#TONIGHT +

Ce real makers back
nutrition of product
WASHINGTON t(A) - The cereal industry snapped back yester-
day at assertions that its products lack nutritional value, telling a
Senate subcommittee a breakfast built around dry cereal is as good
as, or better than, bacon and eggs.
With five specialist witnesses and lengthy statements from the
major companies, the industry described earlier testimony by Robert
Choate as incomplete, misleading, confusing, meaningless and dan-
gerous.
"Quite frankly," declared the Kellogg Co. spokesman, "we fear
that his testimony has dealt a staggering blow to the improvement
of nutritional literacy."
"Breakfast cereals with milk contribute importantly to the nu-
tritional quality of the total breakfast," said Dr. Frederick Stare,
Harvard nutrition professor, newspaper columnist and government
consultant.
Cereals, said Stare, testifying for Kellogg's and the National Bis-
cuit Co., "provide approximately the same amount of protein and
calories as a bacon-and-eggs breakfast."
He said cereals provide substantially more calcium, riboflavin,
niacin, thiamin, and iron and substantially less saturated fat.

NGC TH-EATRE CORORATION
A NATIONAL. 6ENERAL COMPANY
FOH VILlAGE
375 Noe MAPLE RD.-*769.1300
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iiPATTON

eline, pending dire

JERUSALEM (A)-Prime Minister Golda Meir
said yesterday that Israel has no intention of
withdrawing from all the territory it occupied in
1967, but is willing to carry on peace talks despite
doubts as to the Arab leaders' sincerity.
Mrs. Meir told Israel's Knesset-parliament---
that Israel accepted the American proposal "de-
spite the doubts we have concerning the readiness
of the, Arab leaders to embark sincerely on the
road to peace." The prime minister was outlining
Israel's reply to the United States.
She said there has been no decision yet "on
the issue of the map of peace," but she repeated
Israel's determination not to return to the fron-
tiers of June 4, 1967-the day before the Middle
East war sarted-which gave the Arabs "decisive
- advantages."
The plan, proposed by U.S. Secretary of State
William Rogers, calls for a 90-day cease-fire
and resumption of efforts by U.N. mediator Gun-
nar Jarring of Sweden to bring the two sides to
negotiations based on the November 1967 U.N.
Security Council resolution.'The resolution calls
for withdrawal of Israeli forces from all soil seized
in the 1967 war.
The Israei Cabinet voted Friday to accept the
U.S. peace plan already accepted by Egypt and
Jordan.

As Jarring resume
with the big powers
and the Arab states,
pledged the full reso
to help push peace ef
"There is now, I
portant advances," s
"Who knows wheno
other change?
"In the light of t
oral, available to me
after the very helpfu
tary of State Rogers,
developments in the c
East."
Mrs. Meir said she
that Israel would not
cease-fire lines until
reached with the Arai
Reference in the 1
from Arab territory c
believed to be the firs
officially by the Israe
Mrs. Meir said -Is
with the Arabs, des
such contacts.

School of Music and Department of Art
OPER1A
conductor-JOSEF BLATT
stage director-RALPH HERBERT
COMEDY ON THE BRIDGE
Bohuslov Mortinu
GIANNI SCHICCHI
Giacomo Puccini's Hilarious Comedy
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
AUGUST 14-15-17-18 at 8:00 P.M. Admission $3.00
TICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
BOX OFFICE HOURS: Monday, August 10 thru Thursday, August 13
12:30-5:00 P.M. Open 12:30 to 8:00 P.M. Performance Days.
(Closed Sunday, August 16)

-Associated rress
ISRAELI CABINET minister Menahen Begin, leader of the right-
wing Gahal Party, meets press yesterday after submitting his
cabinet resignation. Begin quit the government after Israel's
acceptance of the U.S. Middle East peace plan.

US. admits raiods'
over Cambodia

peter nichols'
JOE EGG
PERFORMANCES THRU SAT.,
Lydi Hoeudelssohn Theatre
Tickets: $1.50, $2.00, $2.50

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SAIGON (4 ) - American officials in
Saigon confirmed yesterday that the U.S.
Air Force is answering Cambodian re-
quests for help by sending up to 50 fight-
er-bombers on daily raids in Cambodia.
Informed sources said the planes each
carry about eight t o n s of bombs and
rockets on their daily missions over Cam-
bodia.
"We are responding to anyone's re-
quest for interdiction missions in the ar-
Manson atty.
asks m-istri~al
LOS ANGELES (P) -- Charles Manson
held aloft yesterday for the jury to see at
the Sharon Tate murder trial a copy of a
newspaper with a banner headline say-
ing: "Manson Guilty, Nixon declares."
His action came as the afternoon ses-
sion resumed, after a morning session in
which a defense motion for a mistrial on
the basis of Nixon's comments was re-
fused.
The judge, after a recess and a con-
ference in chambers, ordered jurors pol-
led on whether they had seen the head-
line.
Coprosecutor Aaron Stovitz shouted,
"Your Honor!" when he spotted Man-
son's action. Newsmen heard one gasp
from the jury box. A bailiff quickly con-
fiscated the paper, an early edition of
yesterday's Los Angeles Times.
President Nixon commented Monday
that Manson was guilty of eight murders,
then later said he did not mean to pre-
judice the case.
Superior Court Judge Charles Older
denied without comment a defense mo-
tion for a mistrial due to the remark.
He said he had taken special precau-
tions to prevent jurors from learning of
the comment, and "I'm satisfied there
has been no exposure."
Nixon, at a law enforcement confer-
ence in Denver, told reporters Monday,
while saying news media sometimes make
heroes of criminals: "Here is a m a n
(Manson) who was guilty, directly or in-
directly of eight murders without rea-
son."
Nixon later issued a statement saying
he did not mean to speculate on guilt and
defendants in the case should be pre-
sumed innocent at this stage of the trial.
Besides the series of seven Tate slayings,
Manson is charged with an eighth mur-
der for which he has not been tried.

ea of Cambodia," said one U.S. official.
Associated Press correspondent T. Jeff
Williams reported Monday from Kom-
pong Speu that U.S Air Force Phantoms
had been dropping bombs and napalm on
Viet Cong and North Vietnamese forces
who had held Highway 4 since Saturday.
cutting off Phnom Penh's access to Cam-
bodia's only oil refinery on the south
coast.
Williams reported yesterday that High-
way 4 had been reopened by Cambodian
forces.
The U.S. Command has declared that
American attacks in Cambodia are aim-
ed at "enemy troops or material which
could threaten U.S and other free world
lives in South Vietnam." But officials in-
dicated that the planes are also striking
at Viet Cong and North Vietnamese
t'oops.
"If the Cambodians say there is an en-
emy troop concentration or supply area
at a given point," one source said yes-
terday, "and U.S. bombers go in to in-
terdict, this seems well within President
Nixon's ground rules."
On June 3, Nixon set guidelines for re-
maining U.S. military activity in Cam-
bodia after the withdrawal of American
ground troops ther-e - a move finished
June 30.
The President said there would be "air
missions to interdict the movement of
enemy troops and material where I find
it is necessary to protect the lives and
security of our men in South Vietnam."
His stated policy seemed to rule out
direct air support for Cambodianaforces,
but wa~s ambiguous enough to allow a
wide latitudesof interpretation by U.S.
field commanders.
Meanwhile, Cambodian troops patroll-
ing Highway 4, 50 miles southwest of
Phnom Penh, found the bodies of 11 civil-
lans, one apparently a European, killed
by a Viet Cong ambush on Sunday.
At last report, Communist forces still
were reported holding Skoun, 40 miles
northeast of Phnom Penh. Cambodian
military spokesmen said government re-
inforcements were being sent there to try
to retake it.
The town straddles a key road junction
leading to the besieged provincial capital
of Kompong Thom, 45 miles to the north,
and the 1st military region headquarters
at Kompong Cham, 25 miles due east.
The commander of the ousted Skoun
garrison told correspondents yesterday
that U.B. Phantom jets bombed and
strafed just ahead of Cambodian troops
trying to recapture the town.

Manshed town

Arnass Pass, Tex. looks as though a bomb had hit it
Celia which passed between it and Corpus Christi
tropic storm, with winds up to 145 miles per hour, 1
officials in Corpus Christi said 90 per cent of the dowr
or badly damaged.
IN LOS ANGELES:
Unrest cormite
wiUvtness on policc

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to direct light exactly where it's needed. Just a
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it, thanks to flexible spring tension balancing.
Vented shade stays cool no matter how tong the
light burns. 7" base, 24" fully extended. White, red
or charcoal enameled metal. U' approved. $20.
Jacb A N
LIBERTY AT MAYNARD

LOS ANGELES(P) A sociology profes-
sor told the President's Commission on
Campus Unrest yesterday, that he is con-
cerned that police undercover agents like
"Tommy the Traveler" may be operating
on some campuses across the nation.
Dr. Richard Flacks, instructor at the
University of California at Santa Bar-
bara, said, "The usual students' assump-
tion lately is that anyone who advocates
violence on a campus is a police agent."
"Tommy The_ Traveler," whose r e a 1
name is Tommy Tongai, is a police in-
formant who officials at Hobart College
in Geneva, N.Y., say posed on their cam-
pus as a student militant.
Hobart officials s a i d "Tommy" in-
structed students on how to make bombs
and urged them to hold violent demon-
strations.
A county grand jury is currently in-
vestigating the charges.
James Ahern, a commission member
and police chief of New Haven, Conn.,
asked Flacks why any law enforcement
agency might try to foster campus vio-
lence.
"Some elements of police forces are

politicized," F
like to discred
Flack's tests
about 10 minu
ican youth, Ji
Angeles, shou
gallery that
racism."
Rodriguez s
Americans or
which was set
June 13 to de
dent turmoil.
Commission
ton, former go
vited Rodrigue
demonstratior
two-day heari
Two other.,
mission yester
chairman of
William McG
versity of Cal
they believed
one of the n
campus unres

NONE"

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