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August 04, 1970 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-08-04

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Itp

Tuesday, August 4, 1970

4'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

lrie £1r419an Bfai1
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mice.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michician Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reorints.

music
Media event atop the Sheraton

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 76
12Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 1970

News Phone: 764-0552

The gvrnetmust_
pay for the SST
ONE OF THE arguments heard most frequently from
the opponents of the Super Sonic Transport (SST)
poses the question of why private industry does not
finance the investment entirely on its own and without
help-from the government.
The answer is that no private company has the kind
of financial reserves that such a commitment would re-
quire. Development of two SST prototype planes will run
.about $1.5 billion. This is an amount equal to twice the
net worth of the contracting company.
IT MIGHT SOUND strange for a conservative to be ar-
guing for government assistance. But I remember
reading that when the railroads were pushing west they
did not have sufficient money and to entice them they
were given every other section of land along the way,
which remained in their possession and which constituted
the greatest worth of the railroads in years. The federal
government long has been a partner in the shipping in-
dustry and in other industries where is was impossible for
companies to provide the initial financing.
But as I said earlierwe do live in a changing world.
Progress and the implements of progress; like everything
else, are selling on today's market at, inflated prices. I
might say we have our liberal friends to thank for this
inflation because it resulted from the extravagance and
inefficiency with which they operated the federal govern-
ment for about three and a half decades.
BE THAT AS it may, developments in transportation
modes around the world are moving ahead at a pace
which we cannot afford not to equal. It is sometimes
argued that America does not need an SST. The people
using this are similar to those cynical Americans who in
the early days of this century used to shout "get a horse"
at every motorist they encountered. History shows that
the traveling public has welcomed every new level of speed
and comfort-from the fast, light "surrey with the fringe
on top" to the 747 jet transport which is beginning to fly
the "wide blue yonder" over America today.
Our time-conscious travelers will welcome the in-
creased speeds. They can be expected to demand it of air-
lines once supersonic travel becomes feasible anywhere in
the world. So we can expect the principal world airlines,
including those in the United States, to buy SSTs wher-
ever they can get them in the near future. If only the
British-French Concorde and the Russian TU-144 a r e
available, then the biggest business ever placed by any
transportation industry will go to foreign countries and
not the United States. When you think of the amounts
involved, this consideration becomes a factor in-America's
ailing balance of payments situation, in its employment
picture, in its image as a world leader, as well as in its

By JOE PEHRSON
W ITH THE amplifiers of the
SRC and the upper deck of
the Sheraton Hotel parking struc-
ture Robert Boury created a media
event Sunday night. Boury, a
young electronic composer at this
campus, combined his organiza-
tional efforts with his own elec-
tronic art "Call It Sheep," to offer
one of the best and most thought-
ful events of this type ever to be
seen in Ann Arbor.
Donald Hall was also at 'the
event and much of his poetry, at
least the poems which stretch
verbal 'metaphor to an absolt'te
absurdity ("The Allegator Bride,"
"The Groom, (return) of the Al-
legator Bride"), matched the pro-
gressive language of the media
artists. In form, however, Hall's
lecture was sadly out of date. A
glance at the wall of the Sheraton
Hotel, illuminated 200-feet in the
air by five slide projectors, ac-
companiment for the electronic
works of George Wilson, Robert
Morris, Kincaid, Carpenter, and
Bury, assured anyone that the lec-
ture-audience situation posed by
Hall was slightly behind the times.
The location for this event had
been planned far in advance, and
for good reason. The majesty of
this media statement can be par-
tially attributed to the parking
structure itself. The visual state-
ment, a series of simultaneous
color slides by Reynold Lowe, filled
the gigantic screen which was the
entire outer surface of the hotel
above the parking structure. The
top level of the structure, open to
a clear sky, served as a location
for audience and the effect of the
celestial majesty added to the
grandness of a media-illuminated
Sheraton.
THE COMPOSERS were equally
anxious for this presentation. The
loudspeakers and amplification
equipment of .the SRC allowed
them to hear their works at maxi-
mum volume, but, unfortunately,
some sound quality was lost to the
open air.
The first electronic work on the
program was Robert Morris's
"On." Due to the shooting at Gall-
up park earlier in the day, the
lights were left on during the non-
visual works and theaudience, as
is typical at outdoor presentations,
was not entirely attentive. "On,"
however, could still be heard over
the audience rumble as could
Morris's fine sense of sound blend.
Terry Kincaid's electronic work

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FURNISHED, spacious 1 and 2 bdrm.
apts., all conveniences, air condition-
ed, undeover parking. 1-864-3052.
50Ctc
ROOM FOR RENT
Call 662-5456 persistently.
1C60
ROOMS FOR MEN ONLY
w. or w/o cooking, nicely furn., $60-65/
mo. 668-6906. 47Ctc
FURN., MOD., 3 BDRMS.
911 S. FOREST
near Hill St.
3-man, $77/ea. 4-man, $65/ea.
CALL 668-6906.
46ctc
ROYAL DUTCH APTS., 715 Church St.;
Edinburgh Apts., 912 Brown St.;
King's Inn Apts., 939 Dewey, taking
applications for fall rental. Call'761-
6156 or 761-3466, 33059
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. SOCtc
4-MAN
ON CAMPUS
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $260/
mo. Featuring:
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry
Parking

CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH.ST.
761-7600

FOR RENT

380tc

--Daily-Richard Lee

"Spring Song" followed a read-
ing of poetry by Hall.- Accom-
panying this work was a series of
slides by Reynold Lowe and a
dancer, Linda Ellis, who, in plac-
ing her body between the slide
projectors and the hotel screen,
cast a shadow of her motion on
the slide sequence. The visual ef-
fects were not closely coordinated
with the musical sound. Rather,
Kincaid set a mood of exploration
with his pensive sounds, and
members of the auidience were
free to form their own visual as-
sociations.
AFTER A SHORT intermission,
George Wilson's "Exigencies" was
presented. Technical difficulties
prevented a good hearing of this
work, and when the problems were
corrected, Carpenter, who was
operating the sound equipment,
did not choose to start the piece
again at the beginning. Wilson's
piece is fantastic and the sounds
could be properly realized with
this sound equipment (when it was
working) The entire piece should
have been played; the haphazard
nature of the presentation rele-
gated the sounds to background
music-the piece is much too in-
tereting for this.
After a reading by Hall of some

current work and some poetry of
Robert Hayden (which was slight-
ly out of plan in the surround-
ings), Robert Boury presented his
own work "Call It Sleep" with
visual accompaniment. This piece
has undergone some recent chang-
es, mostly in variety of sounds and
the addition of operatic "music
concrete." The openness of this
varied statement equalled the open
associations provided by the five
simultaneous slide sequences (Rey-
nold Lowe).
Some associations were deter-
mined by the two media artists.
Boury, at the end of his piece,
includes a section which is entirely
''music concrete,' recorded sounds.
The sounds were those of a sea-
scape, and the slides at that point
were also of the sea. Associations
were determined, but in a very
open way and the audience was
free to participate and make its
own visual and sound associations.
The open nature of the sound con-
tent equalled the open visual con-
tent to make one of the best' in-
tegrated media performances (and
certainly the greatest scale media
performance) to be shown in this
city.
The final event was Carpenter's
tape piece "Lone Wolf" with visual
accompaniment by Lowe.

Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867

36C71I

AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished andunfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets. storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102. 721 S. Forest . Cte
APARTMENT LOCATOR-$12.50, 1, 2,
and 3 bdrm. fall apts. on and off
campus. 1217 S. Univ. 761-7764. 40Ctc
SANS SOUCI APTS.
Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
21Ct*
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments

Goose Lake vs Blues Festival

REFRIGERATOR on floors. Single
rooms, 428 Cross St. 663-3886. 37C62
OLD BUT NICE-1 bdrm. furn. single
or couple only, $160. 668-6906. 48Ctc
LOVELY 2-bdrm. furn., prof. or coupit
preferred, $1685. 668-6906. 49Ctc
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Wall St,-Furnished, new, modern.
efficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom available.
1-864-3852. licte
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40/
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
27Ctc
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2, 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30Ctc
STATE STREET MANOR
1111 S. State Street
2, 3, or 4 man large apts.
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
1-864-3852
1-353-7389
Ctc
AVAIL. FOR SUMMERt & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom.
bi-level apartments. Stop In daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. lICt
LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are
looking for? Tell them cheaply, yet
effectively in Daily classfieds. 764-
0557, 11 a.m.-2 ppm., 764-0557. DU
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
ROOMMATES WANTED
FEMALE GRAD needed to share 1-
bdrm. apt. with same. $90/mo., park-
ing, Packard near State. Na ny, -
647-4862. 39Y61
NEED FOURTH GIRL for apartment in
fail. Call 474 2685 before 4 p.m. 40Y61
WANTED-2 or 3 girls to fill apartment.
769-3130 after 4:30. 32Ytc
FEMALE GRADS seek two female
grad/prof. roommates for Fall. Call
761-7956, 761-4372 after six. 36Y60
PROFESSIONAL FEMALE,a21, needs
apt. and 1 or 2 roommates for fall
on or off campus. 663-3705 after 4.
37Y59
4TH FEMALE Roommate_ wanted for
fall apt., good location. CHEAP. Call
Mary after 5:30 p.m. at 769-0118. 38Y62
ROOMMATE 'til end of Aug. $35. 761-
4809 after 5. 34Y59
HELP WANTED
AMERICAN Academic Environments,
Cambridge, Mass., is a young company
marketing quality consumer design
products to retail outlets. We are now
recruiting for full time positions for
the fall season. Experience is desired,
and a car and willingness to travel is
necessary. For further information
contact the Student Employment
office. 25H63
URGENT-Foster family needed for 15-
yr.-old girl, ward of Juvenile Court.
Call 663-7860. Family in school con-
sultation project. 26$63
UNDERGRAD to help prof (in wheel-
chair) in exchange for room and
board. 761-9034 after 5. 2260
FINANCIAL Analysis-accounting part
time, begin Aug.-school year. Doc-
toral or grad student for social-eco-
nomic organization, financial systems
and statements. Call Students Inter-
national, 769-5790. 21H61
APPLICATIONS are now being accepted
- for executive director of the Waa le-
naw 'Office of Economic Opportunity,
662-.3172. 18H59

WANTED TO RENT
SENIOR WANTS ROOM in house. Now
or in fall. Call Elaine collect, 422-
0761. 31L61
RESP. FRESHMAN needs apartment
and roommates for fall and winter.
Doug Fachnie, 764-8674, 30L60
MALE GRAD student will fill out 3 or
4 man apt. Steve Serchuck, 764-1298,
contact secretary. 29L59
- FOR SALE
CONN TENOR SAX-New neck, good
condition, $175. 665-7282. 3863
MUST SELL immediately, handsome
wood console Westinghouse stereo.
Any offer considered. Alice, 761-1042.
4B61
UTILITY TRAILER fully enclosed box,
suitable for long-distance hauling,
light springs and shocks. 769-7864.
2B60
LEAVING the country, must sell every-
thing. Head skis with Saloman bind-
ings(190cm), $80; Henke boots (9N),
$25. Also going is a Magnavox cabinet
stereo, $150, and a brown dynel wig,
$15. Call Lena, 761-0815. BDS9
PHOTO SUPPLIES
AT CENTURY
The Best in
Good Used Cameras
WE BUY, SELL, TRADE
Everything Photographic
DARKROOM SUPPLIES
LUMINOUS PAPER
Repairs on all makes
Century Camera
(At our new location)
4254 N. Woodward, Royal Oak
Between 13 and 14 Mile Rd.
LI 9-6355
Take I-94 to Southfield Expr. North to
13 Mile Road-then East to
Woodward and North
(Michigan Bank, Security and Diner
Charges accepted)
1Dt
USED CARS

LOST AND FOUND
Chocolate floppy eared Mongrel FOUND
hit at State and Packard. Contact
761-7284. AD60
FOUND-Orange and white male cat
with ring tail, near Union. 769-4275.
AD59
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED TO FT. LAUDER-
DALE Aug. 21-24, can drive and share
expenses. Call 665-2170 after 5. G59
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
RADIO, TV, Hi-fi, car repair. Very rea-
sonable-even CHEAP! 769-6250. XD60
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Unavailable instruments, repairs and
instructions - 209 S. State. 665-8001.
WANTED TO BUY
- TYPEWRITER ELECTRIC
Portable and workable. 761-0047.
32K
PETS AND SUPPLIES
FREE - BLACK KITTENS. Half Sia-
mese, friendly. 482-0492 after 5. 19T61

L INES 1 day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1.55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2.40
10 2.60
INCH ES
1 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 10.70

2 days
1.60
2.15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4.95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35
21.10

UNCONTRACTED Cl

days
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55
31.40

3
4
4
4
7
7.
8
9
9.
17.
25
33
41

Additional costs per day after six da
Ads that are )1/,, 212, 312, etc.
average of the lower and higher

'63 IMPALA, V-8, power steering, power PERSONAL
brakes, new top, Alabama car, no BILLIARD EXHIBITION--
rust, $525, 769-7864, 44N60 JIMMY CARAS
PORSCHEn1964 voupr, excellent con- UNION BALLROOM, SEPT. 16th
dition, new tires and radio, $2100 or Tickets Sept. 1st $1, at door $1.25.
best offer. 769-7549 after 5:00, 45N63 1F63
HOW MANY times will you have the HIROSHIMA-NAGASAKI AUG. 6 Noon
opportunity to buy a 1962 pink rally on diag with labor and peace
CADILLAC in great condition with a group speakers. Workshops Thurs.
leather interior and power everything eve. by IS., Anarchists, Mich. League
except the transmission which ;is to Repeal Draft, SMC, Drugs and the
automatic? Call Rich, 761-0815. ND59 War. See Thurs. Daily for times and
location. Sponsored by SMC. JOIN
1964 SUNBEAN Alpine, very good con- US. 2F61
dition. Call 761-5491, ask for John
or Greg. 42N60 CKA-We have confirmation for our
- ---trip over the blue (?) water-LR.
'69 DELUXE CHEVELLE Malibu 350, FD5I
automatic, power-steering-brakes, air- -
cond., push button windows, polyglass4 WIN A FREE GAME 3 P.M. MON.-SAT.
tires, excel. cond. Best offer over UNION LANES, AIR-CONDITIONED
$2400. 761-6885 morn. and eves. 43N59 3F61
BIKES AND SCOOTERSp
HONDA 750, good machine, between 6-
7:30 p.m. 109 N. Thayer. 39Z61
1948 INDIAN,500ce, twin, rigid frame, Y OU A RE
springer forks original Indian saddle
bags, best offer. 761-0745. ZD53
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By TH E
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26Z71

TP
Ti
N(
B]
w
FE
13E

transportation capability.
-SEN. BARRY GOLDWATER

NIGHT EDITOR: LINDSAY CHANEY

f

By DEBRA THAL
W ELCOME TO Goose Lake,
southeasternMichigan's mil-
lion dollar playground, site of the
Goose Lake Festival. This show-
piece boasts the longest slide in
the world, with a giant air cush-
ion at the end. There is a 30 acre
scramble course, a mile long sandy
beach, a revolving stage for con-
tinuing music, adequate sanitation
facilities, 2000 acres of camp-
grounds and rolling hills and
trees-all for $15.
Goose Lake also boasts of an
eight foot cyclone fence topped by
six strands of electrified barbed
wire. There will be security patrols
(for gate crashers) - on horse
outside the fence; in jeeps inside-
the fence; and in boats along the
lake.
All this, and much more, is
brought to you by your Uncle Russ
Gibb, who also brought the broth-
ers and sisters the Cincinnati Pop
Festival where police watched the
crowd for three days and then
arrested everyone at the close of
this "festival."
According to Webster's New In-
ternational Dictionary of the Eng-
lish Language, a festival is "a time,
of feasting or celebration, a day of
joy."
But, the thought of Goose Lake
doesn't bring me much joy. Once
you enter the festival grounds,
you cannot, leave and come back
without buying a whole new ticket.
And many of the advertised enter-
tainers will not even be there.
Savoy Brown and Joe Cocker are"
just two examples.
And where does the money from

Goose Lake go? Right into the
pockets of the promoters-who are
already rich.
HOWEVER, THERE is an al-
ternative. The Ann Arbor Blues
Festival is this weekend. Although
it does cost $10, there are some
very great differences between the
two festivals.
First, the Blues Festival is non-
profit. It is not planned as a
money-making venture. If, by
some chance there is any profit,
it will go into a fund to help pro-
mote other musical events-hope-
fully free-throughout the year.
It will also ensure that there will
be another Blues Festival this year.
In other words, in case there is
any extra money, it will go right
back to the community.
The money is even paid out at
the Blues Festival. Goose Lake is
paying already wealthy r o c k
groups huge sums for an hour or
two of their time.
The blues musicians, on the con-
trary, really need the money. Some
of them had to have their checks
sent in advance so that they could
pay their bills and get their cars
fixed just to make it here. The
money spent on the Blues Festival
goes into the economy, mostly of
the poor blacks in the South.
"The Blues Festival is a dream
for some of these guys (the per-
formers), not for the prestige but
because they need the bread," said
organizer John Fishel. "These guys
will play two nights a week from
8 until 5 in the morning and only
get $30. And even if they do get
a chance to make a record, they

usually get screwed." W h i t e
groups, like the SRC, can go out
and cut a record for, say,
$160,000."
All in all, the Blues Festival just
has better vibrations. There will
be no police patrolling the fence;
and the fence won't be electrified
barbed wire. People can go come
and go as they wish; there will be
no charge.
Instead of being run by profit-
eering promoters'like Uncle Russ,
the Blues Festival is being run by
students-entirely. All the work on
it, from traffic control to food
concessions to building the stage,
is being done by people from Can-
terbury House and the University
Activities Center (UAC)-with a
little help from their friends.
Indeed, the sponsors, UAC and
Canterbury House, are risking
their very existence on the Blues
Festival If it doesn't break even
and they lose the money that they
advanced, they will be done for.
Although music should be free,
somehow spending the money on
the Blues Festival doesn't seem so
bad. And the sponsors are trying
to make it as inexpensive as pos-
sible so that the non-rich can af-
ford it. Last year, the price was
$14; this year, it is $10._
Festiv ls sponsored by Uncle
Russ and his kind are easy to re-
member for the bad vibes--like
the mass arrests after Cincinnati.
Downbeat magazine called last
year's. Blue Festival "the best
festival of the year, if not of the
decade."_
B. B. King, one of the blues
musicians last year, said, "It's the
greatest thing in the world."

NO LEASE
Couple wants someone to take extra
bedroom and share modern apt. $75/
mo. Call Karen Johnson, 769-7900 or
761-0263. 3C67
ROOM FOR RENT Furn. Call 761-5026
before 11 a.m. 2C63
2 BDRM. FURN, units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448, 15Ctc
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED L EVIS ?
VISIT
Us
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims.......6.50
Buton-Fly ........6.50
Traditional.......6.98
Bells ............7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS ..........2.49

C;l
Al

1335 S. University

665-8825
loctc

BUSINESS SERVICES j
THESES, PAPERS (incl technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc

GREATEST!
GEORGE

I

t,

EXPERI-ENCED SECRETARY desires 1PREE ROCK TIP
work in her home. Thesis, technical Girl with Transport needed fr;a day
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric. trip to GOOSE LAKE FESTIVALi}
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc' PRESS with Photog-rap hoi.Cali wi-
- -- - -- - ard Lee at 761-9452 or 764-0552. I60
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS U.M. BARBERS-U.M. BARBERSHOP
expertly typed-edited U.M. UNION, OR. FL., MON.-SAT.
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS 37F53
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock PAINTING - Student deires painting
service Cobs, inside anid outside. Four years
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE experience. Call 662-4736. FU
call
THE PROFESSIONALS Creative Photography
10 years experience in Ann Arbor WEDDINGS and portraits. lrofesstonai
761-4146 or 761-1187 duality at student rates. Call John
1900 W. Stadium Blvd. Evans at 769-0053 for appointmeit to
26Ptc see portfolio. F60

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MORE LEVI'S-
"White" Levi's .50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's .......

6.98
. .8.50

Nuvo's .. ... . .

MULTIPLE
TYP I NG
SERVICE
'hesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretariat Work
Pick-Up -and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
ite

amplifiers, tuners
turntales,
and tape decks
serviced by experienced,
saIficed t ehnicians
using finest test equipent.
Service manager available Tusda
Call or stop by anytime
769-4700
Hi Fi Buys

STEREO

REPAIR

"I picked it up cheap from the warden
ot Kon Son .. T"

Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam' Store
122 E. Washington

618 S. Main, AA

29F

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