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August 04, 1970 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-04
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.Page Six

P

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, August 4, 1970_

I

Tuesday, August 4, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

." ne vicv mu et tate##
L witior rwl ti nofalr t, r9 + 4 M 106,o #its retat
By The Associated Press
BANDS OF ROMAN CATHOLICS ranged through several
areas of West Belfast yesterday, stoning British troops, throwing
gasoline bombs and building street barricades.
Twenty-five soldiers were reported injured in Belfast's fifth
straight day of rioting.
Troops fired tear gas cartridges into the crowd, but the groups
quickly formed up again after each gas attack.
At Enniskillen, 75 miles from Belfast near the Irish Republic
border, the Rev. Ian Paisley led a march of 1,000 militant Protestant
followers in defiance of a government ban on parades. The marchers
ignored three police lines set up to stop them.
THE URUGUAYAN GOVERNMENT refused yesterday to give
a flat "yes" or "no" to a leftist guerrilla demand that all political
prisoners be released as ransom for two kidnapped foreign of-
ficials.
mFr id ammbers of thte tTupamarosnational liberantinmove
Development official, and Brazilian Consul Aloysio Mares Dias
Gomide.
Sunday, the kidnappers demanded that all political prisoners in
Uruguay be released and sent to Mexico, Peru or Algeria.
Despite the government statement, a Foreign Ministry official j
told newsmen he expected a final government decision on whether
to negotiate would be made within 48 hours.
AN ARKANSAS CONGRESSMAN yesterday assailed p o o r,
helh odiinsi nrin-oms
Rep. Daid Pryor -hkmes. a House speech claimed that'
four out of every five nursing homes getting federal payments from1
medicaid and medicare are violating health standards.
"We have D rn d over the sickest, most helpless and most vulnerable'
patient group in the medical care system to the most loosely con
trolled and least responsible faction," Pryor said.
The congressman said his staff is investigating the deaths of 14
elderly patients from food poisoning in a nursing home in Baltimore,
Md.
THE SENATE yesterday passed a bill creating a corporation-
style U.S. Postal Service that would take over management of
the nation's mails li
The Senate bill would also provide an eight per cent postal
Sthebill was returned to the House, where a final vote is
expected to send it to President Nixon before the end of the week.
The statute creates an dependent postal service run by an
11-man board of governors and ends almost all aspects of Congress'
181 years of control over the mails.m
The compromise bill eliminated provisions for a Congressional
velo pmenail rates which would be set by an independent rates
commid.

Ohio governor orders grand

LIGHT VOTING EXPECTED TODAY
Levin, Romney favorites in p

0

jury robe int
KENT, Ohio (A) - Gov. James A. Rhodes order-
ed a special grand jury probe yesterday to deter-
mine "what, if any, criminal acts took place"
when four students were shot to death during
campus disorders at Kent State University last
May 4.
The grand jury, which will be called by Ohio
Atty. Gen. Paul W. Brown at state expense, will
be charged with fixing responsibility for the
deaths which came during a confrontation be-
tween students and National Guardsmen.

o lkiffings
mid-August and continue through mid-Septem-
ber.
Rhodes acted, he said "reluctantly" after Port-
age County prosecutor Ronald J. Kane said he
lacked the $100,000 or more such an investigation
might cost. Kent is in Portage County's jurisdic-
tion.
Rhode's announcement came as investigators
for the President's Commission on Campus Un-
rest, who arrived Saturday, prepared groundwork
for a commission hearing tentatively scheduled

A small turnout is expected
today as Michigan's electorate
goes to the polls to decide the
final Democratic and Republi-
can candidates for the Novem-
ber general election.
Two contests, one in each
party, have been the focus of
attention throughout the cam-
paign. "I1!
On the Democratic ticket,
four candidates are vying for
the right to face incumbent
Gov. William Milliken in the
November election.
On the Republican side, Le-
nore Romney, wife of the for-
mer governor, is opposed by
State Sen. Robert Huber for the
U.S. Senate. nomination. The

winner will face Sen. Phillip
Hart who is making ,his bid for
a third term as a U.S. senator.
In the gubernatorial runoff,
Sander Levin and Zolton Fer-
ency seem to be heading the
field of four, filled out by
George Parris and George
Montgomery. Little major-con-
trast has arisen from the Levin-
Ferency contest, with both can-
didates spending more time at-
tacking the Republican incum-
bent than each other.
Levin counts his basis of
strength among the emerging
line of liberal Democrats. In-
cluded within this camp are en-
dorsements from organized la-
bor, and some educators and

black leaders. He stands on his
six-year record in the State
Senate. with two years as.minor-
ity leader and two years as state
Democratic Party leader. His
major handicap- has been a'lack
of state-wide recognition.
Leaning heavily on volunteer
support, Ferency has run a
tight-budgetted campaign while
attacking L e v i n for excessive
spending. After opposing Rom-
ney for the governor's seat in
1966, Ferency fell into disfavor
within his own party by oppos-
ing the policies of President
Johnson in 1967. Soon afterward
Ferency quit the post of state
Democratic Party leader, which
he had held for two years.

Parris and Montgomery. both
discounted by seasoned election
viewers, have taken more con-
servative stands than their op-
ponents.
In the senatorial runoff, po-
litical observers are watching to
see if the Romney name can still
hold its own when put before
the electorate.
Avoiding reference to her
husband (former Michigan gov-
ernor, now Nixon's Secretary of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment) Mrs. Lenore Romney em-
phasizes what she calls the
"need for the voice of a con-
cerned woman."
Huber, considered the under-

Cl
it
tt
ti
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tl
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it

Brown said he expects the probe to begin by for Aug. 19-21.

MICHIGAN REPERTORY,'70
peter nichols' UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
501 EGG
"A BRILLIANT STROKE OF THEATRE"-London Observer
"A DESPERATELY FUNNY PLAY"-Life
OPENS TONIGHT!
PERFORMANCES THRU SAT., AUG. 8

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box Office: 668-6300

8:00 P.M
Tickets: $1.50, 2.00, 2.50

Double Feature
"A Rare Film! Fascinating ...
Remarkably Contemporary !
Tense . . . Engrossing -and
Certainly for New Generations.
A Brilliant Cast - Miss Dee

Gives a
ance!"

Shattering

Perform-

Starts Tomorrow
"ONE OF
THE YEAR'IS
10 BEST!1.
"A Look at America-the Dis-
passionate Society and the Part
the Media Play in Desensitiz-
ign Us as We Filter Our Emo-
tions Through a Spaghetti of
Wires"
---NEIL GABLER, Michigan Doily

-Associated kPress
UNITED NATIONS SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE to the Middle East, Gunnar
Jarring, right, confers with Secretary General U Thant yesterday in New
York. They discussed the possible next steps in Arab-Israeli peace talks.
CASUALTIES LIGHT:
urricane Ceia ravages
Texas ulf coast towns

peace s,
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. IW dSecre-
tary-General U Thant and his Middle
East envoy began a round of talks yester-
day on steps to follow up acceptance of
the U.S. peace proposal by Israel, Egypt
and Jordan.
Thant and his special representative,
Swedish diplomat Gunnar Jarring, held
a long private conference during the mor-
ning and then met with high U.S. of-
ficials, including Secretary of State Wil-
liam P. Rogers.
Jarring, who arrived in New York Sun-
day night, was expected to meet separ-
ately with representatives of Israel and
the Arab countries, as wellas other in-
terested governments, to work out ar-
rangements for Israeli-Arab peace talks,
U.N. officials declined to disclose the
precise questions under discussion, or to
make known Jarring's appointment
schedule, but it was assumed that a key
issue was the implementation of a cease-
fire. This is the first step in Rogers' plans
to get the two sides to stop fighting and
start talking.
Diplomatic sources said Jarring already
had made initial contact with the Israeli
delegation but had not yet scheduled a
meeting with Ambassador Yosef Tekoah.

Id-

- JUDITH CRIST, New York Magazine
"INTENSE AND FURIOUS...
THIS MOVIE IS OBVIOUSLY
GOING TO TALK TO A
LARGE AUDIENCE!"
-VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. Times
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S MOST
IMPORTANT FILMS!"
-WILLIAM WOLF, Cue Magazine

beyond the age of innocence...
into the age of awareness

PARN JULES DASSIN
PRESENT$
a TEG4ca=OR. A PARMO4NT PiCTURE
with Raymond St. Jacques
Ruby Dee

mdium
cool
technicobor
@ a paramount picture

CORPUS CHRISTI, Tex. (P)-Hurricane
Celia, its vicious winds gusting as high as
145 miles per hour, screamed devastating-
ly through Corpus Christi and its bay
area yesterday, leaving the once sparkling
seaside city a wasteland.
Celia slammed across the bay in a pour-
ing rain shortly after mid-afternoon and
wrecked tremendous damage quickly.
Every building in Corpus Christi appeared
to have been hit hard. Looting was re-
ported.
Some downtown buildings appeared to
be eyeless derelicts. Pleasure craft in Cor-
pus Christi's palm-lined marina were
blown ashore, almost in the downtown
district. Power was conpletely destroyed.
Telephone communications were almost
totally out. Glass covered the streets,
strewn with overturned cars.
Despite the severe and widespread
Stocking
student
store
Working in the basement of the
Union, University Store em-
ployes are getting r e a d y for
business this fall. With business
booming, the store facilities
have been expanded to include
what used to be the MUG. The
new addition is already open
for business.

property damage, no deaths were report-
ed. The number of injured was not known.
Nearby Arkansas Pass, a fishing town
of 7,000 persons, was virtually destroyed.
City Manager Gay Walker said "ninety
per, cent of the buildings are gone. There
are seven boats sunk in the harbor and
two shrimp boats are hard aground next
to a pipeline. This is worse than Carla or
Beulah." He referred to hurricanes of
1961 and 1967 that mauled the same
areas.
An Humble Oil & Refining Co. tank
burst into flames at the height of the
blow at Ingleside, across Corpus Christi
Bay. "This place is practically wiped
out," said Troy Kizer, a municipal judge
at Ingleside. "We've got to get some help
in here."
There was no communication possible
with most of the bayside towns.

The Gahal flank held only 6 of 24 cab-
inet posts in Mrs. Meir's coalition govern-
ment and its withdrawal thus would not
force Israel to reverse its stand on the
peace plan.

Meanwhile, Israel's
party, angered by the
ance of the U.S. peace
Middle East, voted last
government.

hawkish Gahal
cabinet's accept-
proposal for the
night to quit the

PART 01
Gallup Pa
music sho
Y01
ro(
The week
Park ended
argurhent o
one persor
Ann Arbor
murder.
The wour
was reporti
evening af
surgery Su
the upper
Yesterday
of 803 Got
court on th
The shoo
concert eri
crowd of so
went over
apparently
drinks for I
Accordin
an argume
prietor and
Morris atte
shot three
Hunter I
chased by
When pl
ed at the
Hunter dro
Yesterday
.32 caliber
Morris, a
ren" moto:
Redondo, C
however, a
In YpsllanI

"finally an apartment building the student can afford"
Forest Terrace Apartments
1001 SOUTH FOREST
Two bedrooms starting at only $265.00
" fully furnished and carpeted modern two bedroom apts.
" each apt. equipped with its own burglar alarm system
" private parking free
* garbage disposals
* 24-hr. emergency maintenance service
* live-in resident manager to handle all your problems
See TOM W RIGHT, Apt. 211, 769-6374
or Answering Service at 769-7779

FIPT H POI'UM
D UBEE I FOREA 7T1 TG700
MIT ONNODOUBLE FEATURE ENDS TONIGHT

TI WAITER REARe OIZATBON PRESE TS
' SHIRLEY KNIGHT- AL FREEMAN, JR.
DUTCHMAN
Based on the Award Winning play by
Le Raiones . m ow OmTTmOm 3

Dutchman-6:30
Ulysses-7:30
Dutcman-9:45

'I

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