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August 01, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-01

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THE MICRIGAN DAILY

I~

420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michiaan Doily exoress the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reorints.
SATURDAY, AUGUST It 1970 News Phone: 764-0552
You shouldn't look
a ift horse:..
FOR MOST AMERICANS the decision by the Carnation-
Company to send 60,000 cases of its low-calorie liquid
diet food "Carnation Slender" to war refugees in Laos
represents the ultimate in corporate altruism. And justi-
fibly so. Carnation's action goes to prove what industrial-
ists have been saying for decades, namely that if business
is left free of government interference, the welfare of ev-
eryone will be provided for.
In view of Carnation's unselfish attitude toward peo-
ple on the other side of the world, it is more than unfor-
tunate that several prominent members of Congress have
found cause to criticize Carnation's action.
These critics unabashedly point out that "Carnation
Slender" is sweetened by cyclamates, which have been
banned for domestic use since last February by the Food
and Drug Administration, on the grounds they could
cause cancer.
FDA jurisdiction, however - unlike that of the CIA
-- does not extend to Laos and the refugees will have to
take their chances on getting cancer.
Critics also ridicule the logic involved in sending a
diet drink to people who are starving.
These critics sum up their whole argument by saying
that Carnation is probably trying to dump their inven-
tory of a product that has been declared unfit for con-
sumption in the United States, and thus could not be
sold anywhere, and in the process take a gift tax deduc-
tion for their "generosity."
It seems that you can't even do a good turn these days
without someone finding something to complain about.
--LINDSAY CHANEY
It's time to buy
FOR THE PAST FIVE YEARS, many Americans have
given up the enjoyment of eating grapes. Now with
the settlement of the long strike, many of these same
Americans may not have the same strong desire to par-
take of a bunch of grapes.
It may be pointed out that continued abstinence from
grapes could result in the laying off of many of the Cali-
fornia migrant workers. So please buy California grapes,
but only if they have a union label.
-PHILIP HERTZ
NIGHT EDITOR: DEBRA THAL

For Direct Classifiled Ad Service, Phonie 76
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to .3:00

Paranoia blocks festivals

By ANDY GOLDING
MIDDLE AMERICA has once again shown
its colors. This summer, in a rare display
of solidarity, local citizens have banded together
across the nation to put a stop to 32 of the
50 major rock festivals scheduled.
The rock festival craze, though predating
Woodstock actually came into its own there
last August when 500,000 people converged on
the small town. Despite the unprecedented con-
ditions which developed, the promoters man-
aged to bring off a festival successful on all
major counts. At least that was the reaction of
most commentors at the time. They marveled at
how so many people could live together for
three days under such terrible conditions. The
festival was hailed as a monument to man's
ultimate ability to live together.
With this ashthe background, one might
have, expected that opposition to rock festi-
vals proposed for this year would be insigni-
ficant. Obviously, the opposite has been true.
ACROSS THE COUNTRY, wherever rock fes-
tivals have been planned, local opposition has
sprouted. The roots of this opposition have been
invariably based in what might be termed "Mid-
dle American Paranoia."
This syndrome is characterized by unreason-
ed fear of communism, young people, drugs,
and anything else high government officials in-
form them is dangerous to their way of life.
A most eloquent appraisal of this mentality
comes from the movie Easy Rider; in which
it was observed that "... these people will talk
your ear off about being free - but show them
a free soul and they get mighty upset."
And so it has followed that whenever a pro-
posed festival is announced, visions of pot-
smoking, un-American 'hippies' cause local of-

ficials to seek court injunctions or pass emer-
gency measures aimed at halting the event. The
most common charge made in order to force the
cancellation of a festival is that adequate pre-
parations have not been made to accommodate
the expected crowd.
The number of cases for which this has been
true is difficult to determine, but in the most
recent example, that of the Powder Ridge fes-
tival, in Middlefield, Conn., this charge has
seemingly been effectively leveled in an inap-
propriate case. Elaborate plans were made by
the Powder Ridge people, water lines installed,
food concessions, as well as waste facilities and
the other necessities to provide for a safe week-
end.
At this point, then, it becomes the decision of
local courts to decide whether or not the festival
should be blocked. And the result often de-
pends on the court's sense of fair play.
IN THE POWDER RIDGE case; as in most
others, the court's decision was to halt the festi-
val. A similar case is now pending regarding
the Goose Lake Festival, scheduled for next
weekend in Jackson, Mich. There are several
suits by local interests in the area, all aimed at
blocking the event. Decisions are expected soon,
and only then can a conclusion be made, but
particulars in this ease seem very similar to
those that existed for Powder Ridge.
Interestingly enough, residents at Powder
Ridge are now discovering, as over 15,000 have
poured into the area despite the cancellation,
that these young people may not be so bad after
all. As a local market owner remarked, "I'm
surprised. I though we'd' get some arrogant
youngsters, but it h'as been wonderful. Ab-
solutely no trouble."

FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR MEN ONLY
w. or w/o cooking, nicely furn., $60-65/
mo. 668-6906. 47Ctc
ARB -- 4 more (3 Bdrm.) fgr house,
$78/mo./person plus utilities. 9/70-
6/71, prefer grad. Tom, 761-5491. 45058
FURN., MOD., 3 BDRMS.
911 S. FOREST
near Hill St.
3-man, $77/ea. 4-man, $65/ea.
CALL 668-6906.
46Ctc
2-MAN. 1 BDRM. modern apt. on Wil-
mat near hospital, modern kitchen,
A/C, balcony, 1 yr. lease, Aug. thru
Aug. '71. $140/mo. 769-4269 after 6.
38058
ROYAL DUTCH APTS., 715 Church St.;
Edinburgh Apts., 912 Brown St.;
King's Inn Apts., 939 Dewey, taking
applications for fall rental. Call 761-
6156 or 761-3466. 33059
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 500tc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets, storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102. 721 S. Forest. Ctc
APARTMENT LOCATOR-$12.50, 1, 2,
and 3 bdrm. fall apts. on and off
campus. 1217 S. Univ. 761-7764. 400tc
SANS SOUC I APTS.
Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
31Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
loctc
CAMPUS-
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAH LMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600 . -
BARGAIN CORNER
BARTER SALE, household and personal
items, new and old ,name your price.
12 to 7 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 2. 2804
Pittsfield Blvd. SW58
Sam's Store

FORRENT
REFRIGERATOR on floors. Single1
rooms, 428 Cross St. 663-3886. 37C02
OLD BUT NICE-1 bdrm. furn., single
or couple only, $160. 668-6906. 48Ctc
LOVELY 2-bdrm. furn., prof. or coupit
preferred, $1685. 668-6906. 49Ctc
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Wall St.-Furnished, new, modern
efficiency, 1-and 2 bedroom available.
1-864-3852. 11Ctc
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40/
ma. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick . Call Nejac, 662-5671.
27Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. l5Ctc
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2. 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30Ctc
STATE STREET MANOR
1111 S. State Street
2, 3, or 4 man large apts.
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
1-864-3852
1-353-7389
Ctc
711 ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $260/
mo. Featuring : s
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36071
AVAIL. FOR SUMMElt & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. 11Ctc
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc

FOR SALE
MUST SELL within 10 days-'63 Chevy,
6-cy., 2-dr., auto. trans. Had recent
tune-up. $250 or best offer. 764-4424.
1B58
UTILITY TRAILER fully enclosed box,
suitable for long-distance hauling,
light springs and shocks. 769-7864.
2B60
FISHER 120-Stereo and F.M., $230 or
best offer. Dust cover, $15 or best
offer. 761-1731 after 6. 50B58
SILVERTONE tape recorder-Good con-
dition, Leblanc clarinet and case-
cheap. 543 Church St., Apt. 9. 49B58
LEAVING the country, must sell every-
thing. Head skis with Salomnan bind-
ings (190cm), $80; Henke boots (9N),
$25. Also going is a Magnavox cabinet
stereo, $150, and a brown dynel wig,
$15. Call Lena. 761-0815. BD59
1968 CHAMPION Mobile Home, 12 ft. x
60 ft., 2 bdrm., carpeted living room,
17 miles from AA. m ay remain on
present site, exc. cond., termsavail-
able, located in modern park, 662-
3803. 48B58
USED CARS
'63 IMPALA, V-8, power steering, power
brakes, new top, Alabama car, no
rust, $525. 769-7864. 44N60
PORSCHE 1964 voupr, excellent con-
dition, new tires and radio, $2100 or
best offer. 769-7549 after 5:00. 45N63
HOW MANY times will you have the
opportunity to buy a 1962 pink
CADILLAC in great condition with a
leather interior and power everything
except the transmission which is
automatic? Call Rich, 761-0815. ND59
1964 SUNBEAN Alpine, very good con-
dition. Call 761-5491, ask for John
_or Greg. 42N60
'69 DELUXE CHEVELLE Malibu 350,
automatic, power-steering-brakes, air-
cond., push button windows, polyglass
tires, excel. cond. Best offer over
$2400. 761-6885 morn.andeves. 43N59
ALPINE 1725, 1966, one owner, exc.
cond., no rust, radials, rack, other
extras. $1000 or make offer. 663-7042
after 5. 30N58
1965 MUSTANG, dark green, 6 cyl.,
auto., . radio, white walls, mounted
snows. 662-3676 after 5:30. 38N58
1967 SAAB, white, 16,000 miles, must
sell, make an offer. 971-1890. 33N58
HELP WANTEDj

BUSINESS SERVICES
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERI-ENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W: Stadium Blvd.
26Ptc
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
Jto
LOST AND FOUND
Chocolate floppy eared Mongrel FOUND
hit at State and Packard. Contact
761-7284. AD60
FOUND-Orange and white male cat
with ring tail, near Union. 769-4275.
AD59
LOST-5 mo. old orange kitten, long
hair, white chin, near 5th and Mad-
ison. 761-1664. 34A58

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TRANSPORTATION

RIDERS WANTED TO FT. LAUDER-
DALE Aug. 21-24, can drive and share
expenses. Call 665-2170 after 5. G59
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
RADIO, TV, Hi-fi, car repair. Very rea-
sonable-even CHEAP! 769-6250. XD60
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Instruments and accessories, new and
used. Lessons, repairs. 209 S. State.
665-8001. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. X
PERSONAL

WANTED TO RENT

I FA.

IL) UOV~.
~K -
' .
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Y AEU. ALL MV FRiCVs.

E OYSAT

f. \ PARTIES.

NEED
VISIT
fh

LEVIS?
.S
FOR

RESP. FRESHMAN needs apartment
and roommates for fall and winter.
Doug Fachnie, 764-8674. 30160
LADY D'ESIRES own room in modern,
furn., aptadjacent tomSt Joseph's,
for early Aug. occupancy. Box 60,
Mich. Daily or TO 9-3600, ext. 449,
Detroit. 27L58
LIBRA SEEKS comfortable room in
peaceful (tree) house for fall: to
share poems, kitchen, and the, Blue
Green grass of Home. Call Richard,
865-0508 or 764-2547. 28L58
MALE GRAD student will fill out 3 or
4 man apt. Steve Serchuck, 764-1298,
contact secretary. 29L59
SUMMER SUBLET
LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are
looking for? Tell them cheaply, yet
effectively in Daily classifieds. 764-
0557, 11 a.m,-2 p.m., 764-0557. . DU
ROOMMATES WANTED
WANTED-2 or 3 girls.to fill apartment.
769-3130 after 4:30. 32Ytc
FEMALE - GRADS seek two female
grad/prof. roommates for Fall. Call
761-7956, 761-4372 after six. 36Y60
PROFESSIONAL Fih&ALZ0, 21. needs
apt, and 1 or 2 roommates for fall
on or off campus. 863-3705 after 4.
37T59
CTH FEMAI Roommate wanted tox
fall apt., good location. CEAP. Call
Mary eer :3pF!. at 769-0116. 38782
ND MAN for room' and kitchen, 650/
mo. Call Todd, "1 1974= 33758
ROOMMAT 'til end of Aug. $ 7 71
43(0 after 5. 34738
ROOMMATU WANt=:)-raduate etu-
dent to share large ;furnished,-
bdrm. apt. $190/mo. -3 miles from
campus. 781-8975. 35Y53,
GRAD ar P jOPFSXONAL .female to
eare_ 2-bdrm. apt.('iith I other. ar-
bate. -662-7113. 29Y58,
BIKESAND SCOOTERS:
1945 INDIAN, p00cc, twin, rigid fra&e,.'
sringer forka," ostgfrni1 Indian 4"410'
bad, best -offer. .761-W,45. ZD83
LTORCyCCLIiue-upandavie. By
appointment only. Call 65-3114. 26Z71

AMERICAN Academic Environments,
Cambridge, Mass., is a young company
marketing quality consumer design
products to retail outlets. We are now
recruiting for full time positions for
the fall season. Experience is desired,
and a car and willingness to travel is
necessary. For further information
contact the Student Employment
office. 25H63
URGENT-Foster family needed for 15-
yr.-old girl, ward of Juvenile Court.
Call 663-7860. Family in school con-
sultation project. 26H63
UNDERGRAD to help .prof (in wheel-,
chair) in exchange for room and
board. 761-9034 after 5. 22H60
FINANCIAL Analysis-accounting part
time, begin Aug.-school year. Doc-
toral or grad student for social-eco-
nomic organization, financial systems
and statements. Call Students Inter-
national, 769-5790. 21H61
NEED DRUMMER for rock band. 761-
9291 mornings. 20H58
APPLICATIONS are now being accepted
for executive director of the Washte-
naw Office of Economic Opportunity,
662-3172. 18H59
LOOKING FOR A JOB?
Talented or experienced or interested
in a particular field? Try placing a
Michigan Daily "BUSINESS SERV-
ICES" or "PERSONAL" ad-and help
a job find YOU. HDtc
WANTED TO BUY
LARGE USKD. TRUNK.. Call 769-6770
after noon. 33K58
PHOTO SUPPLIES
AT CENTURY
The Best in
Good Used Caees

BOWLING SPECIAL SUNDAY 3/$1
3-MID. UNION LANES. AIR-COND.
46F58
TALL, LEAN, and crispy male search-
ing'for lightweight relationship with
female endowed with some common
sense. Phone Jim, 663-1019 after 6
p.m. 48F59
NOTICE TO MICHIGAN DAILY BOX
HOLDERS, MAIL IS IN THE FOL-
LOWING BOXES: 47. 55. FD

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BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims.... 6.5(
Button-fly .......6:5
Traditional.......6.9
Bells ... .......... 7-5
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS.........2.4
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's ... 5.5(
4 Coloirs)
Sto-Prest "White"
LOve i' . . . . . . . 6.9
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!

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wE BUT, sm.L. TRADE
Everyting Photographic
DAP.R()bi BUPPM S
LUMINOUS PAPER

.

the min i ad
1965 SUPER HAWK
care v Mlles. W1
offer by NI. I.:A
with.MAXI
'Onel I- loe gall!

122 E. Washigton

Repairs ozi al makes
Century Camera
f At our ne wcation)
~Bet~ecn 13, and 14 Mie d.
Take I-94 toouthfteld'Expr. North to
13 Mie d-then -ast to
W664 W64d d orth
(Mici gaiank, 8ecuWIty ind Dinr
Charge accepted)
-DtT

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