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August 01, 1970 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-01
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A

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

11

9

Saturday, August 1, 1970

Saturday, August 1, 1970

4~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Lead, arsenic found SENATE REPORT
in La. waterways Bomb attacks doubled last year

WASHINGTON (A - Preliminary tests show substantial
amounts of lead and arsenic are being poured into Louisiana water-
ways, federal water quality officials have disclosed.
Although they declined Thursday to provide details on the re-
port which apparently is the first of its kind, government witnesses
advised a Senate subcommittee their preliminary tests are being
verified now.
After chief enforcement officer Murray Stein told of the ini-
tial testing results involving intrastate waters, Assistant Secretary
of the Interior Carl Klein said a final determination "will have to
be made by a judge. And I would rather not have Mr. Stein make
that determination until an analytical test has been run on it."
Sen. Philip Hart (D-Mich. the subcommittee chairman, said
later he takes the testimony to mean the case involves " the lower
reaches of the Mississippi."
In Louisiana, Robert LaFleur. director of the state's Stream
Control Commission, said Thursday night: "I know they have been
taking samples and looking for it, but I don't know where they took
them or what they got. They don't tell us much."

WASHINGTON (P) - T h e
number of bomb attacks or at-
tempted attacks in the United
States a g a i n s t government
buildings, embassies, industries,
churches and synagogues has
nearly doubled in the past year,
Senate investigators were told
yesterday.
Philip Manuel, an investigator
for the Senate permanent inves-
tigations subcommittee, said the
number of bombing incidents
has risen from an average of
1.6 per cent in 1969 to 3.1 per
day through the first six months
of this year.
Nearly 100 of the incidents'
documented in a study done for
the subcommittee, said Manuel,
occurred in high schools and

elementary schools "indicating
that teen-agers and even young-
er children are taught how to
use explosives and incendiaries
and indeed are using them."
The 150-page study done by
Manuel and three investigators
on loan from the General Ac-
counting Office covered three
chief areas--bombings and at-
tempted bombings, thefts of ex-
plosives and terroristic attacks
on police and police installa-
tions.

The study and Manuel's testi-
mony prompted subcommittee
chairman John McClellan (D-
Ark), to say:
"With all this information
now available it seems to me no
citizen can any longer be com-
placent about the problem or
be under an illusion about there
being an underground revolu-
tionary effort to destroy this
government."

U prof turns
down UC post
From Wire Service Reports
BERKELEY, Calif.-Prof. Wil-
liam Alston of the University's
philosophy department has refused
a post at the University of Cali-
fornia because of California's re-
fusal to rehire black communist
instructor Angela Davis.
Alston was to have served as
Mills professor of philosophy at
the Berkeley campus for the win-
ter and spring quarters. He re-
fused the post, calling the decision
of the U.C. regents not to rehire
Miss Davis at UCLA a "particular-
ly flagrant case of political in*,er-
ference" in university affairs.
Alston is presently vacationing
near Aspen, Col. and was unavail-
able for comment yesterday.

MICHIGAN REPERTORY' fl
---university players-
TONIGHT
garson kanin's
BOR N YEST E RDAY

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Air Conditioned

8:00 p.M.
Ph: 668-6300

"COME TOGETHER"
A play by Jonathan Slade
MUSIC BY THE FLOATING OPERA
Sunday, Aug. 2 8 & 10 p.m.
635 S. Main, AA $1.00
"I've told you about the walrus and me"
JULY 31, AUGUST 1-FRIDAY, SATURDAY
SMARRIED A W ITCH
dir. Rene Clair (1942)
FREDRIC MARCH-VERONICA LAKE
Charming fantasy of a major director.
Short: CHICKENS COME HOME (Laurel & Hardy)
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-887175c Auditorium

I Last Time Around
THE SORRY MUTHAS
with BILL HINKLEY
TONIGHT
at
$1.50 at the door, which opens at 8.
"Mutha music" causes you to roll your fingers on
the table top, nod your head from side to side, knock
your knees together, top your toes, and if you do all
these at the same time you need a sedative."
-THE BEARDED WHIZ
blues. iuq, blue grass
Center for Alternative Media Projects
presents
THEWA
GAME
extraordinary documentary . a fifty
minute dress rehearsal for Hell . . ."-THE
NEW REPUBLIC
". I cried, it was an experience not a movie,
a purging by pity and terror, and when the
lights came up at the end I was exhausted, I
didn't want to talk to or look at the people I
came with . . ."-ESQUIRE
"It may be the most important film ever made.
We are always told that a work of art cannot
change the course of history, I think this one
might. It should be screened everywhere on
earth."--THE OBSERVER
MONDAY, AUGUST 3
7:00, 8:30, 10:00, & 1]1:30
Admission 75c
B WAYIOUSD
330 MAYNARD

-Mass.
jall PV~
NEW BEDFORD, Mass. 0)A -
Nineteen persons identified by
police as Black Panthers were
arrested yesterday and an as-
sortment of weapons was con-
fiscated in a raid on Black
Panther headquarters.
The .arrests came following
three nights of racial disturb-
ances and sniper fire in -t h e
South and West End sections.
Mayor George Rogers said he
thought the, arrests had errad-
icated "the forces of revolution
that have been at work through-
out the community."
Racial violence broke out here
early in July and one b 1 a c k
teen-ager was shot to death and
three others were injured.
Three whites were charged
with murder. Trouble flared
again this week, with reports of
sniper fire and a 25-year-old
white man, Stephen Botelho
was shot in the leg while driv-
ing near t h e alleged Panther
headquarters.
All those arrested yesterday
were charged with conspiracy to
commit murder and conspiracy
to commit anarchy. The group

police
inthers,
included three women, one of
whom, a 15-year-old girl, was
injured in the early-July dis-
orders.
The raid came at Pieracin-
ni's Variety Store which w a s
burned out earlier in the month.
Police, joined by state troopers,
also conducted a house-to-house
search of one block near the
store.
Police Capt. Harry Kenyon
said weapons, including auto-
matic rifles, a n d ammunition
were discovered at the store and
in other buildings that w e r e
searched. Kenyon identified the
men as Panthers.
Kenyon said city police, aided
by 40 state troopers, would con-
tinue to search buildings in the
West End where helicopter re-
connaissance indicated snipers
may have been firing from.
Shortly after t h e arrests
Mayor Rogers said, "This bears
out our contention some time
ago that the violence had been
f o m e n t e d by revolutionaries
and self-styled leaders who are
not representative of the com-
munity.

CATHERINE PERRY, foreground, and Sheila Roach, left, after arres
Black Panther headquarters. The women, shown entering court, were I
charged with conspiracy to commit murder, anarchy, incite to riot, an

Uruguayan leftist guerrillas
kidnap, injure diplomats

MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) - Leftist guer-
rillas kidnaped a U.S. embassy official and a
Brazilian diplomat yesterday and then offered to
exchange them for prisoners held by the govern-
ment.
A note delivered to the newspaper El Diario
did not give the number or names of political
prisoners to be freed for the hostages.
The note said the U.S. official, Dan A. Mitrione,
50, was shot in the chest when he was seized but
claimed his condition was not serious. The guer-
rillas failed in attempts to abduct two other U.S.
embassy officials who suffered injuries in their
escapes.
The latest kidnapings followed a pattern that
began in Latin America nearly a year ago, with
guerrillas seizing foreign diplomats and holding
them hostage for the. release of prisoners.
One diplomat, West German Ambassador Count
Karl von Spreti, was killed by Guatemalan guer-
rillas in April after the government refused to
free 17 political prisoners.
The kidnapers, members of the leftist Tupa-
maros band, seized Mitrione as he was driving to
work by blocking his car and dragging him into
another vehicle. The Brazilian, Aloysio Mares Dias
Comigde, 41, who previously had been assigned to
Miami, was taken from his home.
The guerrillas delivered their communique to
the newspaper which relayed it to the police.

Included in the communique was a medical
report on Mitrione that said he was in no danger
from the chest wound. The guerrillas also sent a
note, reportedly written by Mitrione, and the serial
number of his watch to prove to authorities that
they had him in their custody.
Mitrione, a World War II Navy veteran and
former Indiana policeman, was public safety ad-
viser for the Agency for International Develop-
ment, which dispenses U.S. foreign aid abroad.
Dias Comigde was Brazil's consul in Montevideo
and first secretary in the embassy.
Moments after police announced the double
kidnaping, Gordon Jones, 26, second secretary at
at the U.S. Embassy, showed up dazed and in-
jured at the suburban home of Juan Antonio
Paolino.
"He reached my house in a daze, and asked
incoherently if he could use the telephone," Pao-
lino said. Paolino quoted Jones as saying he had
been taken at gunpoint from his home, tied and
wrapped in a blanket, and placed in a car.
Nathan Rosenfeld, 48, a bachelor from Mer-
kimer, N.Y., "played dead" when guerrillas hit
him on the head as he entered his garage, a U.S.
Embassy spokesman reported. He said the guer-
rillas ran..
Rosenfeld, the embassy's cultural affairs of-
ficer, was only slightly injured and returned to
work in the afternoon.

appeal'
CHICAGO (P)-William Kunstl
Chicago Conspiracy trial, said Thu
filed asking an appeals court to ro
contempt citations against seven de
because of alleged wiretapping by the
Kunstler said in a telephone int
tapped several telephone conversat:
chairman of the Black Panther Part
Garry, while Seale was being held :
time of the trial.
Seale was later cited for conter
from that of the other defendants.
Kunstler said the government h
conversations related to the conten
that it has refused to make records
able to the defense.
A representative of the White Pi
closed that Kunstler may defend Jo
conspiring to bomb the Ann Arbor
tember 1968.
The Panthers also announced t
the free rock concert, in Gallup Pai
celebrate the end of a fast protestin
clair, who is currently serving a 9%
session of marijuana. The concert i
and the Funkadelics.

3020 Washtenaw Ph. 434-1782

Box Office Open Today 12:30
SHOW TIMES
Today and Sunday
1-3-5-7-9
Monday and Tuesday.
7-9

Thousands gath
of banned rock

603 E. Liberty St.

HELD
OVER!!
fHOWS AT

rfectaor bt )lModern Ceob'zq - . IN I
DIAL 5-6290 1 -3-5-7-9 P.M.
"JACK plus SANDY plus NEIL
equals A BAGFUL of LAUGHS!"
-N.Y. DAILY NEWS

THE FIRST OF THE SHOCK ROCK!
"Russ Meyer promised to make the wildest, craziest, funniest,
the farthest out Musical-Horror-Sex-Comedy ever released.
He has succeeded." -Los Angeles Herald Exami
Thi s not a se
there has never bee
nything liket
O smeDos
. A Russ Meyer Production

MIDDLEFIELD, Conn. (0")-- T h e
weather was hot and muggy, there was
no music and not much to do, but young
people kept streaming into the Powder
Ridge ski prea yesterday for a rock fest-
ival banned by court order.
Some of them hitchhiked and others
drove and abandoned their cars and
trucks up to five miles away near police
barricades and continued their trek on
foot.
Estimates varied, but at least 15,000
to 17,000 young people dotted the ski
slopes of Powder Ridge.
Why do they stay?
"It's a lot better than hanging around
town," said a 17-year-old from Webster-
Mass.
Others were convinced there would be
a festival. And one youth from nearby
Meriden said he would stay "until the
food runs out. I've got to get my twenty
dollars' worth somehow." Tickets for the
full three days of the scheduled rockfest
sold for $20.
Meanwhile, in New York City officials

of the New
turned down
ival be held
Yankee Stad
plan was "in
The festivE
hoped to hor
at the stadiu
A few of t
Ridge and w
arrivals.
"There's r
came here fi
a group of
Despite th
the festival
residents of
4.500 were no
out.
"I'm surpri
arrogant you
derful. Absol
Habersang, c
from the ski
been "better
week.

Serving dinner until 2 am

Jon The Daily
Sports Staff

JACK LEMMON SANDY DENNIS
ANBlLSIMONSTORY
THE OUT-F-TOWUERS
S COR OByMOVe. A tA MoU#.r PI

Fron 201h Ce t D~Stin OLLY READ / UYKIHLA YRS IMAIA ACOM JH N U A R L/M AEL BLODGETT
DAI 61 BR AK / c-EDY WI UAMS /'rom ad WtRUSS MU R/cmre.RO6ER BERT j
dor Ih#JR& EBERTu i8USS _ ! R tPMIISiOtr Color by DELWE' Positively No One OX..
Uinder 18 Yrs. Admitted
14tiE NAr~a l HEntl lx' AIM DU. u I .16aetfi.4oU u ~rssrne

-Associated Press
Marriage on Sunday
Roger Mills, a whitelaw clerk, stands with his black fiancee, Berta Linson after
a U.S. District Court judge in Jackson, Miss., overturned a state law banning
interracial marriages.

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