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July 30, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-30

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fe £Afripgn Badt
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily exoress the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.

Blacks will bethe vanguard

Thursday, Jul 30, 1970

THE MICN1IGAN DAILY

I

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1970

News Phone: 764-0552

Hint of things to come
ONE MORE indication has come to light of the lengths
to which the powers that rule the University are
willing to go to repress dissent and maintain their control.
In a secret action last April, the Regents voted that
students who have been arrested and forfeited bond
should be barred from re-enrolling in the University until
their court cases have been finished.
The immediate effect of the action was to bar about
five of the students arrested4n last September's LSA Bldg.
sit-in from continuing at the University. This is especially
ironic since major portions of the statute under which
arrests were made in the sit-in have since been ruled un-
constitutional - making it likely the five will never
be convicted.
BUT THE constitutionality of the law and the guilt or
innocence of the accused students are essentially ir-
relevant to the question of whether they should be
barred from re-enrolling for "jumping bail."
Strikingly, there has been no punitive action taken by
the University against those already convicted in the
sit-in case. Neither should there be: Participation in the
demonstration in no way reflected on the academic com-
petence of those involved.
Why then should those who have forfeited bond on-
the same charge be penalized by the University? The
courts and legal authorities can handle such cases them-
selves: Bail jumpers have already been penalized by their
forfeiture of bond and face possible imprisonment if they
are apprehended. There is no reason why the University
should feel obligated to add to this penalty, except, per- -
haps the desire to further add to the repression of their
activities.
Despite its obvious unfairness and the aura of suspic-
ion and secrecy surrounding its formation, the policy on
bail jumping seems of only symbolic interest when com-
pared to the more comprehensive action taken by the
Regents in April.
This was the establishment of the new "Interim
Rules" under which an "impartial" (sic) hearing officer
appointed by the president will act as judge, jury and
executioner in non-academic cases brought against stu-
dents.
Together, the two actions offer a good indication of
the thrust of regental action against dissent in the months
to come. Both will require a firm, possibly militant re-
sponse from the University community.

By JEAN GENET
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This article is re-
printed with the permission of Ram-
parts Magazine).
FOR THE WHITE MAN, history,
past and future, is very long,
and his set of references is very
imposing. For the black man, time
is short, for his history has been
brutally interrupted a n d modi-
fied by the whites, who have done
everything to prevent him from
having his own, original develop-
ment. And in the U.S., we are still
busy setting limits on black peo-
ple's time and space. Not only is
each and every one of them forced
to withdraw within himself; he is
also imprisoned by us. And when
this is not enough, we assassinate
him.
Because of Chairman Bobby
Seale's exceptional political stat-
ure, his trial is in fact a political
trial of the Black Panther Party
and, on a more general basis, a
race trial held against all of
America's blacks.
T HE REALITY of the black col-s
ony'within the United States
is very complex. Dispersed as they
are within a nation so chauvinis-
tic that she likes to think of her-
self as master of the world, the
blacks, who are oppressed by rac-
ism and indifference and threat-
ened by an oppressive police and
administration, have been forced
to wage a very new type of fight.
That is how the Black Panther
Party was created: first of all to
defend the rights of the colonized
blacks inside the U.S., but also to
synthesize new ways for blacks to
struggle against white oppression.
Faced with the vigor of their
action and the accuracy of their
political thinking, the whites -
and especially the police - had a
racial reaction almost immediate-
ly: as soon as the blacks proved
that they were able to organize
themselves, the whites rushed to
discredit their organization.
The police were therefore able
to hide the true meaning of their
intentions behind pretexts-trials
based on drug, murder and con-
spiracy charges. The fact of the
matter is that they were trying to
massacre the leaders of the Black
Panther Party.
In 1968, at the time of Huey
Newton's trial, the government
still seemed reluctant to massacre
the Black Panther Party. From
May 2, 1967, to September 28, 1968
- the date of Huey Newton's trial
- there w e r e 55 cases against
members of the Black Panther
Party. All of this happened with-
in a period of 16 months.
But if we do another calcula-
tion, this time from September
28, 1968, to December 8, 1969, we
find that there w e r e 373 cases
against the Panthers. That was
during a period of 15 months. It is
now April 1970. Less than a month
ago, Bobby Seale was extradited
from California and sent to jail
in New Haven, Connecticut. There
were a few demonstrations, but
they were really very weak com-
pared with what happened during
Huey Newton's trial.
WHAT ABOUT US: What are
wedoing? When the bombs
hit Hanoi, we had some epidermal
reactions. So did we during the
Korean war. These massacres
weretaking placefar away. Here
and now, we are finding out that
the colonized, within our own
borders, who still appear to us
like shadows in our midst, a r e
about to become our adversaries,
in our own country.
To a foreign observer, the de-
terioration of relations between
blacks and whites is without mys-
tery. In one year, police repres-
sion has so brutally escalated that
white Americans are full of fears.
All kinds of fears. First of a 11,
there is fear of the police. Intel-
lectuals know (or think) t h e y
are threatened by Agnew's brag-
ging. Even if they've demonstrat-
ed their disgust w i t h Newton's

trial, today they are silent: Bobby
may die.
By intensifying the repression,,
the Nixon administration knew it
could quiet the intellectuals who
are comfortably set up in univer-
sities or in well-protected neigh-
borhoods. Intellectuals owe it to
themselves to take up the chal-r
lenge, and to refuse the Nixonian
order.
Liberals who hollered so loudly
during the Chicago trial are now

mute. And to justify themselves,
they even say that thePanther
Party is endangere by its own
violence.
Another fear is showing its true
colors, and without daring to call
it by its proper name, everybody
recognizes it. "Bobby Seale? After
all, he's a black man."
This reflex, in each white man,
is less abrupt than I have stated.
Probably it's never expressed in
these terms, even under people's
breath. But in an even more sur-
reptitious way, the thought goes
through people's minds and cor-
rupts them. The intelligence and
political daring of the blacks
makes white people uneasy and.
indignant,
Blacks who have kept their
sensitivity intact even in the face
of such threats once again rec-
ognize the appearance of the old
enemy: racism.
If y o u n g white Americans in
the past few years have tried to'
conduct themselves on an equal
basis with blacks, police terror is
"about to throw them back into
their forefathers' stupidity.
While middle-aged Americans
in the lap of comfort huddle snug-
ly in their security, the young will
have everything to lose of they let
themselves be dispossessed of
their fighting spirit. If they want
to bring themselves together with
blacks, whose revolutionary ma-
turity is evident, they will need
courage - but also intelligence,
which is much rarer in this coun-
try.
BOBBY SEALE'S trial will be a
test for young white 'revolu-
tionaries. It is their turn to prove
how clearly they can analyze the
situation and how skillfully they
can go about finding means for
action. This, here and now, is the
moment of truth - for Bobby
Seale, for the Black Panthers, for
young white Americans.
If the repression increases, it is
obvious that the blacks will see a
collective crime being committed
against them, a crime committed
in collective complicity. On the
other hand, if whites who call
themselves radicals a r e able to
bring themselves together with
blacks for this trial, theirs will be
a great victory. The torment of
guilt which supposedly is crippling
them will lose its power. Even a
slight retreat in the repression
would be a victory for the blacks,
and also for the whites. One would
doubt whetherrwhites could pre-
vent the trial from happening, but
they could affect the verdict and
its application. White Americans
must do everything they can for
Bobby, since this is how the blacks
will see whether or not they must
act alone. If they are forced to
act alone, after the trial, t h e y
might have to act in desperation.
And no one would dare want to bey
the cause of such desperation.
We must also be aware of the
fact that blacks have been able to
liberate themselves from the old
terrors exercised by whites by
means of the Christian religion.
For more than 400 years, whitest
were able to use the Old and New
Testaments with diabolic skill. We
know what happened: to the
blacks, the whites advised the gen-
tleness of the evangelical moral
which makes it a duty to respect
the master- the white man; to
suffer in'silence; and to wait fort
divine rewards after death. At the
same time, the Bible was read to
them, filled with celestial threats
against those who revolt.
VIOLENCE. If we m u s t, let'ss
talk about it, but by seeing itt
first for what it is: a word. A -
word used by those who elaborat-
ed and imposed the language: the
masters. According to h o w the1
word will serve them, it can sig-

nify God's will; used against
them, it can become a sign of
shame and degradation. When
white men use violence, violence
is good. When blacks use it, they
are considered animals. However,
it so happens that the blacks have
exposed the tricks of language, as
they have exposed religious tricks,
legal shams and social deform-
ities. Blacks aren't afraid of words
anymore, regardless of the color-
ation that whites might give to
them.1
It is evident that recommending
non-violence to blacks is an effort
to retain the Christain vocabu-
lary which has kept them impris-
oned in passivity for so long,, How-
e v er Christian the whites are,
they don't feel guilty about using
guns: that is violence. Asking
blacks in America to be non-vio-
lent means that whites are de-
manding a Christian virtue which
they themselves do n o t possess.
That means that whites are once
again trying to dupe the blacks.
White people call the blacks' re-
volt violent, their actionsdviolent.
The blacks don't give a damn, if
they need violence in order to sur-
vive and to live. The blacks can-
not be intimidated. They are al-
ready the stronger because they
are right.'
For the whites, the cry of the
blacks is an act of violence which
shatters their delicate eardrums.
Apparently, these whites aren't
conscious 'of the fact that black
music was once a wail: today it's
a battle cry. -
Let's go back to the statistics I
quoted earlier: from May 2, 1967,
to September 28, 1968 - a key
date, the date that Huey was con-
demned to 15 -years in prison -
there were 55 cases recorded
against the Panthers. From Sep-
tember 28, 1968, tosDecember 9,
1969, there were 373 cases. The.
acceleration of the repression is
staggering. It is aimed above all
at the Black PantherParty. From
March 1, 1968, to August 25, 1968,
five Panthers were killed. From
October 6, 1968, to December 20,
1969, 15 Panthers were killed. The
figures are accurate. Here are
some more: from March 2, 1968,
to September 28, 1969, 130 Pan-
thers were called in for question-
ing, as compared with 738 who
were summoned from September
29 to December 9, 1969.
Therefore, in one year, the re-
pression increased in a direct pro-
portion of one to seven.
IF WE RECOGNIZE the fact
that the Panther movement is
the most profoundly revolutionary
movement in America, it is time
for us to act as quickly as we can
to prevent its total destruction.
Without a doubt it is a question of
life and death for the Black Pan-
ther Party and for Bobby Seale -
but also for all revolutionary
movements in this country.
We might also add, for those
who don't believe they are direct-
ly concerned with the revolution
because they have material se-
curity: a critical, revolutionary
mind doesn't necessarily develop
only among the poor or the weak.
In different ways it can develop
in the minds of the rich and the
strong. Even though it is fed by
demands whichare the result of
social injustice and inequality,
revolution is an act of intelligence
and sensitivity. Above all, revolu-
tion thinks itself into being. As
such, it uses the tactics m o s t
suited for its-realization. The rev-
olution will be made by everybody.
What is new abgut this situa-
tion is that in a nation where
white people are in the majority,
the revolutionary core is contain-
ed in the black community. We
must therefore acknowledge the
fact that its leaders are Cleaver,
Newton and'Seale.
@ Ramparts Magazine

SINGLE ROOM, refrig. and light cook- 1302 OLIVIA, all furnished, 2 bdrm.
ing. 436 Thompson. 44065 apt. 353-1993. Avail. Aug. 24. 43057

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 7G
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

REFRIGERATOR on floors. Single
rooms, 428 Cross St. UN,4-3889. 3762
2-MAN, 1 BDRM. modern apt. on Wil-
mot near hospital, modern kitchen,
A/C, balcony, 1 yr. lease, Aug. thru
Aug. '71. $140/mo. 769-4269 after 6.
38058
ROYAL DUTCH APTS., 715 Church St.;
Edinburgh Apts., 912 Brown St.;
King's Inn Apts., 939 Dewey, taking
applications for fall rental. Call 761-
6156 or 761-3466. 33C59
711 ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal fr 3 or 4 $260/
mo Featuring:
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry -
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36071
LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are
looking for? Tell them cheaply, yet
effectively in Daily classifieds. 764-
0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. DU
AVAIL. FOR SUMME1t & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.) 10 a.m,d e 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. liCt
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50tc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished andunfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets, storage and parking.
Call a n Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest. Ct
APARTMENT LOCATOR-$12.50, 1, 2,
and 3 bdrm. fall apts. on and off
campus. 1217 S. Univ. 761-7764. 40Ctc
SANS SOUCI APTS.
Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
3Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fal semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
loCtc
BARGAIN CORNER
BARTER SALE, household and personal
items, new and old name your price.
12 to 7 p.m.,- Sunday, Aug. 2. 2804
Pittsfield Blvd. 8W58'
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS ?
VISIT
t US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims......6.50
Button-Fly. ........ 6.50
Traditional. .....6.98
Bells ..... ...7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS.........2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's ... 5.50
11(4 Colors).
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's .........6.98
Nuvo's..........8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam's .Store

122 E. Washington

2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. l5Ctc
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2, 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30Ctc
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Walls St.-Furnished, new, modern
efficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom available.
1-864-3852 or 665-7273. 1ICtc
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40/
ma. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
27Ctc
FURNISHED-FALL RENTAL
1 and 2 Bedroom Apts.
1111 S.-State
1506 Packard
1-864-3852, 353-7389 or
761-2366 after 5.
12Ctc
CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
380tc
WANTED TO RENT
LADY DESIRES own room in modern,
furn., apt, adjacent to St. Joseph's,.
for early Aug. occupancy. Box 60,
Mich. Daily or TO 9-3600, ext. 449,
Detroit. 271,58
LIBRA SEEKS comfortable room in
peaceful (tree) house for fall: to
share poems, kitchen, and the Blue
Green grass of Home. Call Richard,
665-0508 or 764-2547. 28L58
MALEGRAD student will fill out 3 on
4 man apt. Steve Serchuck, 764-1298,
contact secretary. 29L59
BASEMENT or adequate area for pho-
tography darkroom in exchange for
light maintenance duties. Call 761-
3406 after 4:30 p.m. 26L57
RESP. GRAD student needs apt. for
fal. Can afford up to $100 and 20
min. drive to'Northeast. Call collect
216-831-1472. 25L57
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
1948 INDIAN, 500cc, twin, rigid frame,
springer forks, original Indian saddle
bags. $300 or best offer. 761-0745. ZD53
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26Z71
BUSINESS SERVICES
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 2Jtc

USED.CARS
ALPINE 1725, 1966, one owner, exc.
cond., no rust, radials, rack, other
extras. $1000 or make offer. 663-7042
after~5. 30N58
'64 FIAT-Needs work, runs, best offer.
761-3269, 6-7 p.m. Thursday. 40N56
OPEL, 1968 - Only 8000 miles. Blau-
punkt AM-FM radio, stick shift, extra
snow tires. $1245. Leaving country.
662-8788. 41N65
1968 FIREBIRD 350-Exc. cond., auto-
matic. $2000/best offer. 665-5671. 36N56
1962 VW-Call John at 764-6632. will be
sold by Aug. 7. Excellent cond. 37N56
1965 MUSTANG, dark green, 6 cyl.,
auto., radio, white walls, mounted
snows. 662-3676 after 5:30. 38N58
SAAB, 1967, 20,000 miles, mechanically
excellent, body eeds work, $350. 764-
4457 or 761-5919. 39N64
1966 VW bug, new tires, motor rebuilt,
$700. Call 662-3351 5-8 p.m. 32N56
1967 SAAB, white, 16,000 miles, must
sell, make an offer. 971-1890. 33N58
1966 MG Sedan, front wheel drive, $650
or best offer. 769-0363. 35N56
HOW MANY times will you have the
opportunity to buy a 1962 pink
CADILLAC in great condition with a
leather interior and power everything
except the transmission which isj
automatic? 'Call Rich, 761-0815. ND59
FOR SALE
FISHER 120-Stereo and F.M.. $230 or
best offer, Dust cover, $15 or best
offer. 761-1731 after 6. 50B58
MUST SELL within 10 days-'63 Chevy,
6-cyl., 2-dr., auto. trans. Had recent
tune-up. $250 or best offer. 764-4424.
1B58
SILVERTONE tape recorder-Good con-
dition, Leblanc clarinet and case-
cheap. 543 Church St., Apt. 9. 49B58
LEAVING the country, must sell every-
thing. Head skis with Saloman bind-
ings (190cm), $80; Henke boots (9N),
$25. Also going is a Magnavox cabinet
stereo, $150, and a brown dynel wig,
$15. Call Lena, 761-0815. BD59
1968 CHAMPION Mobile Home, 12 ft. x
60 ft., 2 bdrm., carpeted living room,
17 miles from AA. may remain on
present site, exc. cond., terms avail-
able, located in modern park.5662-
3803. 48B58
ONE OF a kind .91 K. flawless diamond
with emeralds, engagement-wedding
ring set. 663-9100 eves. 47B57
PETS AND SUPPLIES
KITTENS NEED HOME. Call Irene, 668-
7111. 18T57
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND BOARD for 2 student girls,
linens, quiet area, $23, for fall. 549
4th St. 32E56
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-5 mo. old orange kitten, long
hair, white chin, near 5th and Mad-
ison. 761-1664. 34A58
LOST-Evans red, white,'and blue girl's
bike, good shape, reward. 665-7374,
call after 6 p.m. 33A57
FOUND-Little girl's dress, baby shoe,
grey sock, rubber teddy bear, man's
boot, bikini bottom, and dismembered
doll. Call Sebastian, 769-4549. AD57

HELP WANTED
UNDERGRAD to help prof (in wheel-
chair) in exchange for room and
board. 761-9034 after 5. 22H60
LABORER with mason tending experi-
ence to work remainder of summer.
Must have own transportation. $2.75
per hour to start. Call 665-8373. 231158
FINANCIAL Analysis-accounting part
time, begin Aug.-school year. Doc-
toral or grad student for social-eco-
nomic organization, financial systems
and statements. Call Students Inter-
national, 769-5790. 21H61
NEED DRUMMER for rock band. 761-
9291 mornings. 201158
BABYSITTER needed nights, Mon.-Fri.
Call 971-5748 before 4 p.m. 19Htc
APPLICATIONS are now being accepted
for executive director of the Washte-
naw Office of Economic Opportunity,
662-3172. 18H59
LOOKING FOR A JOB?
Talented or experienced or interested
in a particular field? Try placing a
Michigan Daily "BUSINESS SERV-
ICES" or "PERSONAL" ad-and help
a job find YOU. HDtc
ROOMMATES WANTED
GRAD or PROFESSIONAL female to
share 2-bdrm, apt, with 1 other. Bar-
bara; 662-7123. 29Y58
2 FEMALES needed to share bedroom
in large 3 bedroom house in fall.
Call 663-2838. 31Y57
WANTED-2 or 3 girls to fill apart-
ment. 769-3130 after 4:30. 32 Ytc
FOURTH GIRL needed for apt. In fall.
Call 761-5557 after 9 p.m. 27Y57
MALE GRAD needs room, roommates,
for fall. Call 761-3674 after 6. 25Y57
APT. SUBLET for August, own room in
apt. w/4 bedrooms, living room, bath,
kitchen, dining room, parking. $30.
Call 1-653-1744 after 5. Will negotiate.
'28Y56
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to share expenses
and driving to L.A., leaving Aug. 1st.
Call Bob, 668-6482. 4057
BOULDER, DENVER, ASPEN area, can
take 3 riders. leaving Aug. 1 or 2,
return about Aug. 10. Call Wed, or
Thurs. 5-12 p.m. collect (station) 518-
462'-3958, Friday after 10 p.m. 769-2792,
Roger. 1G56
WANTED TO BUY
LARGE USED TRUNK. Call 769-6770
after noon. 33K58
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
FENDER bandmaster speaker bottom,
$75. Call 769-0137 persistently. 16X56
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Unavailable instruments, repairs and
instructions - 209 S. State. 665-8001.
X
RADIO, TV, Hi-fi, car repair. Very rea-
sonable-even CHEAP! 769-6250. XD60
FOR SALE--CELLO (Kay) and bow-
$75, Hallicrafters portable radio, AM-
FM, 2 SW bands-$25. 662-4622, espe-
cially mealtimes. 15X56
SUMMER SUBLET
AUGUST ONLY-One rm, effic., air-
cond., exc. location. 665-5671, 20U56

C
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-MARTIN HIRSCHMAN
Jush bt teg inning

THE CONVICTION of former Newark Mayor Hugh Ad-
donizio is little more than a small start in the battle
against organized crime in New Jersey. Yet it is a start.
Corruption remains rampant in the state, but at least
J.S. Attorney Frederic] Lacey has demonstrated to the
many politicians of the Garden State, who have made
fortunes out of corrupt political deals, that prosecution
and conviction are very real possibilities.
Since being appointed to the post, Lacey has probed
into the affairs of politicians at all levels, and not sur-
prisingly, he has discovered scores of corrupt deals as
well as numerous connections with organized crime. It.
must be stated, however, that the investigations have
proceeded extremely slowly and are constantly being
threatened by political pressures.
So far Lacey has remained adamant in his intention
to continue investigations, but he must continue to do so.
His prosecution of Addonizio must be only the beginning.
-PHILIP HERTZ

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NIGHT EDITOR: DEBRA THAL

Summer Editorial Staff
ALEXA CANADY..........................................Co-Editor
MARTIN HIRSCHMAN..................................... Co-Editor
SHARON WEINER ........................ Summer Supplement Editor
SARA KRULWICH .......:'............................ Photo Editor
LEE KIRK .......................................Summer Sports Staff
NIGHT EDITORS: Rob Bier, Nadine Cohodas, Erika Hoff
ASSISTANT NIGHT EDITORS: Bill Alterman, Lindsay Chaney, Phil
Hertz, Debra Thai
Summer Business Staff
IAN WRIGHT............................Business Manager
PHYLLIS HURWITZ+...................Display Advertising
RICHARD RADCLIFE........................Classified Advertising
DAVID BELL..............T.T.D....... Circulation
ASSISTANTS: Debby Moore, Janet Engl, Andy Golding

Letters to, the Editor

26Ptc

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11

Priorities
To the Editor:
I HAVE JUST READ the bal-
ancing teacups article by Nadine
Cohodas (Daily, July 18). I fail
to comprehend. how -anyone can
waste so much time and effort
stewing over a tasteless commer-
cial (no less watch it in the first

place) while children are starving
to death before our eyes, migrant
workers are living in filth and-
men, women and children are be-
ing senselessly killed in wars and
various other military and non-
military outbursts. Talk about a
re-ordering of priorities!
-Mary Louise Cox '66
July 20

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