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July 30, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-30
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I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-

0

Thursday, July 30, 1970

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Page Six

Thursday, July 30, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_ ,.

1

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7DWRlt1t
:news

briefs

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S*ttr A#4.,. *$OVO rtU $'.e', &ALIO
f; r a * of . 04tw C~*At oit# b1+r t n
By The Associa/ed Press

THE, BATTLE for the Kiri Rom plateau in Cambodia end-
ed yesterday in a major Communist victory as the last govern-
ment troops fled from the hill resort.
Meanwhile, the Phnom Penh government has decided to restrict
the operations of South Vietnamese troops in Cambodia because of
their large-scale looting.
THE ALL-BLACK PAUL QUINN COLLEGE in Waco, Texas
was closed yesterday after firemen called to put out several cam-
pus fires were pelted with rocks. The cafeteria was destroyed.
The fires and rock throwing followed a demonstration Tuesday
night by students protesting the firing of certain school personnel.
PRIME MINISTER GOLDA MEIR'S government failed againE
yesterday to reach agreement on the U.S. Middle East peace plan.
And Iraq pledged to thwart the American proposal even at the
risk of an Arab civil war.
The Iraqi threat came in an announcement over Baghdad Radio
while the Israeli cabinet held its second two-hour meeting in three
days without replying to the U.S. proposal, already accepted by Egypt
and Jordan.
Radio Baghdad also said the 10,000 Iraqi troops based in Jordan
-another 8,000 are stationed in Syria-has been placed under the
Palestinian guerrilla command.
UNION LEADERS ACCEPTED yesterday a compromise wage
offer and called off Britain's two-week-old national dock strike
just before it began to really hurt.
Delegates representing 46,000 members of the Transport and Gen-
eral Workers Union voted 51-31 to return to work Monday.
The delegates accepted "an interim measure'" a complicated wage
formula proposed by an independent inquiry court and already ac-
cepted by the employers.
Its main provision will add about $6 to the worker's average week-
ly earnings of $84. The fallback rate - the minimum paid to every
man whether the ports have work for him or not - goes up from
$40.80 to $48.
WHOLESALE PRICES rose five-tenths of one per cent in
July, the sharpest hike in six months.
The increase, attributed largely to a steep rise in food prices1
was announced in San Clemente where President Nixon is putting
final preparations on the budget, estimated at $215 to $220 billion.
Meanwhile the Treasury Department revealed that one-fifth
of the money from the President's revenue-sharing bill would be
split up by New York and California.
---------------- ----- --- --

ROTC losses
paid by
University
The University has agreed to
pay $18,700 for ROTC equipment
stolen or damaged in the May
takeover of North Hall, it was
disclosed yesterday.
This money was paid out of
University self-insurance fund
which gets its assets from sev-
eral University divisions includ-
ing residence halls.
Despite the return Tuesday of
several itemsyallegedly taken
during the May 6-7 takeover,
several objects including radio
parts and a mimeograph ma-
chine were still unaccounted for.
Of the $18,700 payment,
$14,200 was for ROTC equip-
ment and the rest was for Uni-
versity it'ems. The payment was
made because the University's
insurance policy is $25,000 de-
ductable.
Approximately two-thirds of
the money is payment for mis-
sing items and the other third
is for damage repair.
Friday the FBI attempted to
get into the Legal Self-Defense
office and confiscate several
items allegedly stolen in May.
Lacking a warrant however,they
were denied access to the office
and had not returned to the of-
fice when a ROTC represent-
ative came and picked them up
Tuesday.

GOOSE LAKE PARK JACKSON, MICH.
the world's first permanent festival site
dear brothers and sisters,
jethro full, small faces, mountain, ten
years after, savage grace, frost, chicago, john
sebastian, new york rock and roll ensemble,
flock, james gang, and lots more are just HALF
the FUN at GOOSE LAKE PARK.
such PERMANENT FREE FEATURES as
parking, huge restrooms (with showers and
bathing facilities), a clean. beautiful lake to'
swim in, shaded beach areas, dune buggy and
motorcycle trails, camping, rain covers, fire-
wood, custom designed music bowl, and sound
system, medical facilities, open kitchens with
rice and macrobiotic foods,- general store,
world's largest slide and "moon landing," fresh
air, rolling meadows, unlimited grass, .and lots
more are the OTHER HALF of the FUN at
GOOSE LAKE PARK.
let's all come together a . . at goose lake
park.
peace,
dick songer
p.s. to avoid hassles, we are elling chips ONLY in advance
at the following outlets: Hudson's, Grinnell's, the GOOSE
LAKE office, 30999 Ten-Mile, Farmington, Michigan. ONE-
DAY CHIP (SUNDAY ONLY) $6.00, THREE-DAY CHIP
$15.00.
Call (313) 831-1652 for information.

--NYC
troubles
NEW YORK Uth - New York City wa
limped through a third day without the
enough electricity yesterday as a num-'ju
va
ber of giant corporations as well as sys
houswives joined in turning off lights I
and air conditioners despite hot, muggy tor
weather. po
Voltage to the city was cut back by 3 vis
to 5 per cent by Consolidated Edison Co., pa
which appealed for people to use'less f
power. em
The reduction was not enough to make bu
TV pictures shrink orlight dim, but it co
was enough to maintain a satisfactory 1
reserve as the afternoon temperatures tut
rose above 90. ing
Mayor John Lindsay, a f t e r meeting at
with his Emergency Control Board, asked lut
the city's 200 major electric consumers W
to reduce their use of power so the sub- I
ways could be kept at full speed. an
The city's power reserve had dropped a
to a dangerously low level following fthe
failure of a 260,000-kilowatt nuclear pow-
er generator on May 20 and a one-mil- in
lion-kilowatt generator on July 21. y
But it was the summer's worst heat clo

30
ve now i:
e power cr
mp in ele
te and in
stems.
In Baltim
ry ailment
rt outside
ibility had
red with
Conditions
ergpncy 1l
t a caref
rntinued.
A spokesn
ion Cont
gton noted
Philadelp
tion levels
ashington
In the Ca
d atmosp
potential
)ne was rel
those sts
sterday mq
ouds.

-Assoc ae ress
OFFICIALS AT Consolidated Edison's Energy Control Center in Manhattan
keep an eye on the' power supply situation Tuesday, top, while sweltering com-
muters line up for subway in Grand Central Station during the rush-hour. Con-
solidated Edison's five per cent cut in power slowed subways in New York's hottest
day of the year.

UNION CONTRACTS SIGNED

"ULYSSES'A SUPERB FILM!"
-ife Magazme

THE WAL TER READE.JIR./JOSE~PH STRICK PRCOICI

MICHIGAN REPERTORY' 7fl
---university players-
s TONIGH T
garson kanin's
BOR N Y EST E RDAY

"A SUPERB
FILM !"
-Life Magazine

"Stunning in Its
Frankness Yet
Lyric in Its
Visualizations.
Nothing Short
of Brilliant.
FI ci iless Cast."
--Judith Crist
TION
"This is not a
picture to be
' enjoyed only by
those who know
the book"
!ed to
of age San Francisco
MHAN Chronicle
"LIKE A
VOLT JOLT
FROM THE
THIRD RAIL!I
It Hits Even
Harder on the
Screen Than It
Did on the Stage!"
Time Magazine

Grape settlement nears
DELANO, Calif. UP) - Leading table grape centive pay and some f r i n g e health benefits.
growers and the AFL-CIO United Farm Workers While it was not announced, reliable sources
Organizing Committee signed union contracts yes- said the contracts were for three years and called
terday, foreshadowing an end to a five-year for $1.95 an hour in the first year and $2.05 an
strike and a national boycott against the $222- hour in the second and third years.
million-a-year industry. The earlier contracts were for $1.75 an hour
In the ceremonial signing at the drab union and 25 cents a box.
headquarters in a field west of this California Chavez claims most of the workers previously
Central Valley town, union leader Cesar Chavez earned the state minimum wage of $1.65 an hour.
announced that 25 to 30 per cent of the crop was Growers have said that when paid by piece work
still not covered but forecast that remaining or incentive wages during the harvest peak, some
growers would fall into line quickly. workers averaged as much as $3 an hour.
Contracts signed yesterday were with 26 grow- Some onlookers predicted that the signings
ers in the Delano area. where the harvest is about foreshadowed eventual unionization of the entire
to begin. $4.6-billion-a-year California farm industry, the
The holdouts are farther north in the Fresno state's largest money producer.
and Lodi areas. "Chavez apparently has won a battle but not
Contracts were signed earlier this year with the war," said Allan Grant, president of the state
smaller growers in the Coachella Valley and other board of agriculture and of the California farm
southern sections. bureau federation.
California produces more than 90 per cent of "Actually," he added, "the grape acreage in
the nation's table grapes. Most of the major California is only a small percentage of the state's
wineries-who do not use table grapes-in the total agriculture and an infinitessimal part of
Delano area have been signed up with Chavez national total all of which Cesar Chavez has in his
since 1965. long range sights. What has occurred has made
The new table grape contracts call for $1.80 it very clear to all growers that the UFWOC threat
an hour minimum wages plus 20 cents a box in- is facing them to."
U.S. okays gear
sale to Red China

Injunction
two rock I
By The Assocatet
Court injunctions have blocket
scheduled for this weekend, but ab
ported to have arrived yesterday a
anyways.
Other injunctions against festiv
summer have been issued following
extravaganzas posed serious health a:
Rock fests scheduled for this we(
Middlefield, Conn., were blocked by
week.
Despite signs on major highway
festival's site at Powder Ridge ski a
prohibited, the young people bega
Tuesday.
Iowa Supreme Court Justice C.
junction Tuesday barring a propose
The injunction came at the r
Richard Turner. Turner and Gov. F
promoters. Sound Storms Inc., of Chi
adequately for a three-day encampn
persons.
But at least one rock festval wa
the "World Universe Antediluvian E
bration Festival and Sports Car Rall;

Lydia Mendelssolin Theatre
Air Conditioned

8:00 p.m.
Ph: 668-6300

OL AM0tW0 OPEN 6:45
_Feature
Promptly At
1214A University 7 P.M. & 9 P.M
DIAL 8-6416 __________
"BRILLIANTLY BITCHY"
TIMEI
"NOTHING SHORT OF BRILLIANT"
JUDITH CRISTr
"SCREAMINGLY FUNNY"
JOYCE HABER j
Spend a marvelous evening with eight of the boys.
Mart Crowey's'
'U"" S0 IN fTIi EANE)
ACMFd rt .-AN GenPc e fCcbe

"TOLD WITH BRUTAL
ELOQUENCE! Shirley Knight
is close to perfect -
es .startling! Al Freeman, Jr.
is excellent!" -Brendan Gill,
The New Yorker
"A STRIKING EXPERIENCE
AND ONE WITH AN
IMPACT THAT IS ALL BUT
UNFORGETTABLE! Creates
a shattering impact. A
vision of undiluted harsh-
ness and language of
untempered fury!"
Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review
"THERE HAS NEVER BEEN
ANYTHING LIKE THIS ON
THE AMERICAN SCREEN!"
-William Wolf, cue Magazine
LEROI JONES'
e warier Pea(*eOga n on "Pre,, -
SHIRLEY KNIGHT
AL FREEMAN, JR. I M lm
ALFEM ND.h ONE UNDER 18 YEARS Of AGE Witt fADMITED.
Producer GENE PERSSON " Assoc. Producer HY SILVERMAN " Music by jM N BARRY - Director ANTHONY HARP
A GNE MASSON ENTER PSCIM 0CSENTAcION . PAOrMvuttAS6 (Co.YTm AL"

WASHINGTON (P)-The U.S.
government has given its okay
to a proposed sale of U.S. auto
gear to Red China and has again
indicated its interest in improv-
ing relations with the Peking
regime.
At the same time the State
Department portrayed President
Nixon as favoring more diplo-
matic contacts with the Chinese
mainland government rather
than the formal diplomatic rec-
ognition.
Press Officer John King made
these points yesterday in answer
to newsmen's queries:
-A proposal for sale to Red
China of a reported 80 Italian-
made dump trucks with Gen-
eral Motors engines- would be
okay under the Nixon adminis-
tration's new relaxation of U.S.
trade restrictions on sales to
Communist China. The proposed
sale was described as the first
major one of its kind since the
Treasury Department eased the
trade ban last December.
The total sale would come to
about $2.4 million, officials said,
but they had not figured im-

mediately on what part of that
the GM engines and parts would
be worth.
-Nixon was not talking about
"recognition of C o m m u n i s t
China" in chatting with ABC
newsman Howard Smith after a
television interview last month,
as some press reports indicated.
Rather, the President was
talking about diplomatic con-
tacts such as at Warsaw . . . We
have been more ready than the
Chinese to have talks."
Red China advised British
Foreign Office yesterday of a
decision to release George Watt,
a Briton jailed on spying
charges. His release would come
nearly eight months before the
completion of. his three-year
sentence.
The move was a new sign of
an apparent willingness by the
Peking government to warm its
longfrozen relations with Eng-
land.y
Communist China will send
an official delegation to France
for a state visit next year, a
French government spokesman
in Paris announced yesterday.

VEY

oF ITH H 'OruM
F IFTH AVCUJUAt llnR??
DOWNTOWN ANN AR900%
INF'ORMATION 761-8700
DOUBLE FEATURE
"Duthmn"--6:30, 9:45
"Ulysses"--7 :30 only

Nixont signs crime bill
The President holds the voluminous District of Columbia Crime Contro
day morning in San Clemente, Cal. He expressed hope that this would
anti-crime laws. The bill permits police to break into homes unannoun
ing of defendants.

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