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July 29, 1970 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-29
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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

d J0
Wednesday, July 29, 1970

Wednesday, July 29, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Nixon consumer adviser calls
foreign trade bill inflationary

Mideast

WASHINGTON (4)- Presi-
dent Nixon's consumer adviser
attacked the foreign trade bill
yesterday on the eve of sched-
uled final House committee ac-
tion on the measure. But the
committee reaffirmed its stand
on at least one section of the
measure.
"The imposition of import
quotas will hurt virtually every
consumer in the United States.
particularly lower-income con-
sumers," said a statement re-
leased from the office of Vir-
ginia Knauer, special presiden-
tial assistant for consumer af-
fais.
Shortly after Mrs. Knauer re-
leased her statement, the House
Ways and Means Committee
overrode the objections of Sec-
retary of Commerce Maurice
Stans in closed session and
voted again to maintain a pro-
vision which would strip the
President of the power to revise
the oil-import control progra .
The vote was 17 to 7. An ear-
lier vote was 16 to 5. Final ac-
tion is due today.
Mrs. Knauer predicted the bill
would drive up prices and pos-.
sibly leave poor families inable
to afford shoes and clothing.
"Higher prices, fewer pro-
ducts choices, reduced competi-
tion and a limited supply of im-

ported products are the probable
result of the proposed import-
quota legislation," she said.
Although the President hak
supported textile-quota legisla-
tion, he has threatened to veto
the bill as _it now stands.
Besides providing for textile
quotas and including the oil-im-
port quotas, the bill would set
quotas for shoe imports and give
the President authority to set
quotas on other products.

Ways and Means Committee
member Rep. James Burke (D-
Mass), told reporters after the
meeting that shoe quotas will
stay in the bill.
Although Mrs. Knauer's state-
ment made no mention of tex-
tiles, it indicated some dissen-
sion within the administration
by endorsing federal aid to in-
jured industries or workers in
place of quotas.

Mitchell backs police
in campus shootings

By The Associaied Press
Right-wing members of Israel's cabinet
threatened yesterday to walk out if the
government accepts the U.S. peace pro-
posal for the Middle East.
Meanwhile with Arab ranks also torn
by the proposal, Egypt closed down two
Palestinian guerrilla radio stations for
criticizing Egypt's acceptance of the plan.
The Israeli cabinet postponed for a
second time a decision, and sources said
the rightwing Gahal faction, with 6 of the
24 cabinet seats, was split in a stormy
night meeting.
Israeli's state radio said Prime Minister
Golda Meir was 'conferring with Gahal
leaders in efforts to avoid a cabinet crisis.
Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Dayan,
who is not in the cabinet accepted the
"stop-shooting-start talking" proposal of
U.S. Secretary of State William P. Rogers.
"We are not so strong we can forfeit our
allies," he said.

The
meet a
said a
relucta
plan.
They
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decisio
The
isters a
is almo
will qu
accepts
Egyp:
stinian
nounce
News A
The
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divided
The
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WASHINGTON (1P) - Discus-
sing recent off-campus killings
by police, Atty. Gen. John Mit-
chell said yesterday no one can
deny officers the right of self-
protection.
"If somebody has a gun in
his hand, it may be necessary
for a policeman to protect him-
self," Mitchell said in an inter-
view.
"We have advocated use of
minimum force, but it is not
the intention of this department
or anybody else to deny law en-

forcement people the right of
self protection."
Mitchell drew a distinction
between the shooting of six stu-
dents during disturbances on the
two campuses last May and more
recent deaths, most of which he
said were a result of "normal
police activities."
At least three persons have
died in mass confrontations with
police in the past few weeks.
Mitchell said the circumstances
could not be compared to those
at Jackson State, where two
were killed by bullets from po-
lice and Mississippi highway pa-
trolmen, or at Kent State, where
Ohio National Guardsmen fired.
Into a crowd of students includ-
ing antiwar demonstrators.
Both incidents, plus the death
of six black men during a ra-
cial disturbance in Augusta, Ga..
are under investigation by the
Justice Department. A federal
grand jury was impaneled to
probe the Jackson deaths after
state officials refused to co-
operate with the FBI.

-Daily-Richard Lee
CHIEF CLARENCE CRAWFORD of the naval science ROTC division, leaves the
Legal Self-Defense office with a globe and several other items belonging to the
University's ROTC programs. The items were allegedly stolen from North Hall
during the May takeover of that building by students,

GAY LIB DANCE
FRIDAY, JULY 31, 8:00 P.M.
The Up, Kim & Dallas
Gold Rush Light Show
Beer! B.Y.O. Liquor
Harper Recreation Hall, 7449 Harper
take 1-94 to Detroit, Van Dyke exit
NEW FROM ELEKTRA

-Associated Press
AN UNDERCOVER POLICEMAN wrestles with one youth and
warns another to keep his distance after the youth was appre-
hended overturning a police car during violence at Chicago's
Grant Park Monday night.
SCENE DESCRIBED
'Then I heard 50
to100 shots fred

I

I

tContinued from Page 8)
At one point police threw tear
gas into the crowd of kids.
Two helicopters had been
hovering over the area since the
concert started. After the trou-
4 ble started, one of them began
f ly i n g very low announcing
through a bullhorn, "In the
name of the state of Illinois I
order you to disperse. This is an
unruly mob."
At about 8 p.m. the kids had

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NOTES IN
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pushed the police back onto the
softball field. Then I heard 50
to 100 shots fired. At that time
I was standing on Columbus
Drive, which borders the soft-
ball field on the west.
When the shots were fired,
people started running off the
field in every direction. Plain-
clothesmen wielding rubber clubs
waded into the crowd--still
numbering over 3,000-making
vicious arrests and beating up
anyone they could grab hold of.
Most of the people who left
the field appeared headed to-
wards the "loop" in central Chi-
cago-about a half mile from
Grant Park. By 8:30 p.m. the
softball field had been cleared.
It was fairly dark by then.
The car that had been burned
was still smoking. About 1,000
people from the crowd stayed
in the general vicinity. Close to
200 police were patrolling the
area, and 20 squad cars and
five paddy wagons remained
parked on Columbus Drive.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
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Tickets are available
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ttaken back
by ROTC
By ERIKA HOFF
The FBI again failed to make an
appearance on campus yesterday, and
the Legal Self-Defense (LSD) office al-
lowed an ROTC representative to claim
the materials allegedly stolen from North
Hall during the May takeover of that
building by students.
"We're sick of guarding the stuff," Jim
Forrester of LSD said, "if they want it,
they can come get it." Students had been
keeping a 24-hour watch on the office
shared by LSD and the New Mobilization
Committee to End the War in Vietnam
since Friday when two FBI agents at-
tempted to enter without a search war-
rant and confiscate the allegedly stolen.
property.
After being refused admission Friday
by Student Government Council which
handles office assignments in the Student
Activities Bldg., the FBI agents said
they were trying to get a sea rch warrant.
However, the agents never returned to
the office with a warrant.
A spokesman at the Ann Arbor FBI
office also said Monday that the agents
involved in the case were consulting with
a U.S. attorney in Detroit to decide what
further action could be taken.
William Hart (whose picture ran, with
folded arms, in Friday's Daily), an agent
contacted yesterday at the FBI office in
Ann Arbor. said he had talked with Orin
Jones at the U.S. attorney's 'office, but
neither Hart nor Jones would comment
on the outcome of their discussion.
Chief Clarence Crawford of the naval
science ROTC division retrieved one
celestial globe, a set of miniature signal
flags, a poster card lettering kit, some
miscellaneous papers and a suitcase con-
taining paints and chalk which he ident-
ified as belonging to the three ROTC
programs housed in North Hall.
Crawford said he - was acting on in-
structions from Colonel Samuel Hannah.
chairman of Navy ROTC. Chief Security
Officer Roland Gainsley said the mate-
rials claimed in the LSD office were
ultimately turned over to Hannah.
Before Crawford left with the materials
Forrester said he had been instructed by
his attorney to tell the ROTC representa-
tive. "You people should keep better
track of your stuff.'
University attorney Craig Christensen
said he informed agent Hart yesterday
that the property was being moved to
North Hall. Hart would not say whether
the FBI still intends - to confiscate the
materials.

WASHINGTON (,P)-The presidential
Blue Ribbon Defense Panel recommended
yesterday drastic overhaul of the Penta-
gon's leadership structure aimed at
strengthening civilian control, promoting
efficiency and ending serious cost over-
runs in buying weapons.
Panel chairman Gilbert Fitzhugh, sum-
ming up the findings of a year-long
study, described the Defense Department
as "just an amorphous lump . . . with
nobody in charge of anything."
One of the group's main proposals-
bound to kindle controversy-calls for
stripping the Joint Chiefs of Staff of
their military operational functions and
creating a separate operations staff under
a single, high-ranking officer,
The military chiefs would be left with
their roles as strategic planners and, as
uniformed heads of their services, their

overhauling of

Defens

Chicago police arrest five
city cancels rock conceri

Preidetial panel reco-

CHICAGO P)--Police who said they
were informed of a plot to burn the
Grant Park bandshell, scene of a savage
riot during a rock concert Monday night,
arrested five persons near there yester-
day and charged one with possession of
incendiaries.
Police had staked out the park, where
135 persons were injured during the melee
which forced cancellation of a free- rock
concert series.
Michael Patrick, 21, of Broomall, Pa..
was charged with possession of marijuana
and incendiaries. Charged with disorderly
conduct were Kevin Lee Schwartz, 20, of
Philadelphia, Nancy Nowell, 20, of Lin-
thicum, Md., Joseph Walsh, 23, of Phila-
delphia. and Gail Kuehnle, 21, of College
Park, Md.
Police said they found a number of fire-
crackers, a gallon can of gasoline and
a sac'k of marijuana in Patrick's car.
. Patrick said he and his companions
were returning to the East after a trip
to California and were carrying the extra
gasoline in case they ran out of fuel. He
said they were merely visiting the scene
of the riot out of curiosity.
Police said they stepped up park pa-
trols following the arrests. The concert
series had been intended to build cam-
araderie between city authorities and
youth.
The Chicago Park District commission-
ers voted unanimously to cancel four
"pop" concerts scheduled for the park in

August and another program set for
September in Soldier Field.
Mayor Richard J. Daley and Daniel J.
Shannon, park district president, said the
three-hour clash between policemen and
demonstrators was "premeditated.'"
Police arrested 165 persons on charges
of mob action as a result of the melee.
Three youths were wounded by gunfire.
Of those injured, 65 were policemen.
Daley told a news conference: "Mon-
day's concert was held to provide enter-
tainment for young people. The hope-
the belief-was that they would govern
themselves. How can we achieve a con-
dition in which young people will disci-
pline themselves?"
Shannon said the "pop" concerts were
programmed for the youth because for-
mer outdoor concerts traditionally pre-
sented symphony music aimed at an
older generation.
Shannon said chains, rocks, knives and
guns were brought by "those bent on de-
' struction," who pushed away "the good
kids who just wanted to communicate
with music," He said the battle was
planned by persons who wanted to break
down the "camaraderie" the Park Dis-
trict established with youths.
The battle started shortly after the
concert began at 4 p.m.
A group of youths stormed the stage
and demanded the immediate appearance
of the featured group, Sly and the Family
Stone, which was scheduled to perform
at 4:45 p.m.

The g
concert:
they w
spokesn
group t
p.m., a:
caused

authority to recruit, train and equip their
forces.
Fitzhugh, board chairman of the Me-
tropolitan Life Insurance Co. of New
York, acknowledged that the chiefs are
"less than enthusiastic" about the panel's
reorganization ideas.
Two of the 14 panel members dissented.
Wilfred McNeil, for 10 years Defense De-
partment comptroller and now director
of Fairchild-Hiller Corp., contended that
instead of decentralizing decision-making
authority its recommendations on organ-
ization should "go in the other direction."
Urging the most far-reaching Penta-
gon reorganization in nearly 10 years, the
panel would establish three powerful
civilian deputy defense secretaries to
supervise all military operations and a
centralized intelligence setup; all re-
search, procurement, bases and man-

power,
tests a
An i
would
throug
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be thrf
mands
land-ba
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distribt
logistic:
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panel v
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Comma

-I

OVER 25,000 LP'S,

OVER 300 LABELS IN STOCK
WATCH FOR SPECIAL SALE
ITEMS CHANGING WEEKLY

u ci i g

I

Heavy Duty Steering
and Suspension Parts
" BALL JOINTS
f IDLER ARMS
* TIE ROD ENDS

iscount records

0*

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