100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 28, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-28
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4

Tuesday, July 28, 1970

Tuesday, July 28, 1970

TM G A
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

if

It*V4 it willvp r0 rte 4 iAIII+

news

briefs

4 g
s

Vila 101*la* esof v.0 (kn**e mc43vetion it s tr# t gat
T3;heLr Assoc ialed PreĀ°ss
BRITAIN'S DOCK STRIKE entered its 13th day yesterday
as a government-appointed board of inquiry issued a five-point
settlement plan.
As a basis for settlement of the strike, which has crippled the
country's imports and exports, the plan would turn down the main
wage demands by 47,000 striking dockers but it recommended im-
provements in overtime, vacations and "modernization" payments,
which could hold substantial appeal for the strikers.
The Transport and General Workers Union called a special meet-
ing of 80 union delegates for tomorrow to vote on the proposal, which
the employers accepted an hour after the board put forward its rec-
ommendations.
WEST GERMAN AND SOVIET foreign ministers settled
down yesterday to negotiate a treaty to promote better under-
standing between their countries..'
West Germany's Walter Scheel and the Soviet Union's Andrei
Gromyko met for three hours in the opening sessions of a confer-
ence in which they hope to work out an agreement to renounce the
use of force.
As an essential first step in improving Bonn-Moscow relations,
the conference will cover issues in dispute between Bonn and Com-
munist Eastern Europe. In particular, Moscow seeks West German
acceptance of present European borders, including the former Ger-
man territory allotted to Poland and Russia following World War II.
* * *
U.S. PLANES BOMBED both sides of the Cambodian border
yesterday, seeking out in Cambodia base camps the enemy may
have set up since the allied incursion this spring.
The U.S. command ordered the strikes in Cambodia after intel-
ligence reports revealed that some North Vietnamese were moving
back into bases on the Cambodian side of the border in the wake of
the U.S. and South Vietnamese drive into the sanctuaries in May and
June.
The U.S. command also announced that its troop strength in
South Vietnam fell by 1,800 last week to 406,000 - the lowest since
January 1967,
ANTONIO SALAZAR, former prime minister of Portugal,
died yesterday at the age of 81.
Salozar was, prime minister for 36 years until a head injury and
a subsequent brain hemorrhage incapacitated him in September 1968.

SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE
Open Tuesday and Thursday, 10-1 and 2-5

SGC talks
with VP
hopefuls
By BILL ALTERMAN
Two new names were add-
ed yesterday to the list of
people who might be offered
the job of vice president for
studentservices.
Amid speculation that Presi-
dent Robben Fleming will try
and have the 'position filled by
September 1, Gretchen Wilson,
currently working part-time for
the Office of Student Organiza-
tions, and law professor Robert
Knauss, chairman of Senate
Assembly, metseparatelylast
evening with representatives of
Student Government Council
and several other student or-
ganizations. The purpose of
these meetings was to sound the
two out on their views as to
the role they would fill as vice
president.
Acting Vice President Barbara
Newell is reportedly preparing to
leave her position soon. She is
currently out of town and could
not be reached for comment.
In interviewing prospective
candidates, SGC appears to be
attempting to have some say in
the final selection. All five of
the original candidates screened
by a search committee ap-
pointed by Fleming have, for
one reason or another, refused
the job.
With Newell apparently ready
to resign, it was feared Fleming
would, with little student con-
sultation, announce a new Act-
ing Vice President.
Before leaving on vacation,
Fleming met with Knauss and'
discussed the job with him. Yes-
terday Knauss termed the situ-
ation "fluid."
During last evening's inter-
view. Knauss voiced his fear
that OSS was "in danger of dis-
intagrating completely." He said
he doesn't see his role as that
of the voice of the students, but
rather as a "student advocate."
He added he would take the
job only if Fleming guaranteed
him flexibility in the area of
appointments and allowed him
to reorganize and restructure
the office.
Mrs. Wilson, who was on the
committee that three years ago
selected Fleming to be the new
president, said that if she took
the job, she would expect to be
fired 4-8 months after starting.
She explained that sooner or
later she would voice disagree-
ment with the administration
and would be forced to quit.
Although she wouldn't expect
to last, Mrs. Wilson hoped that
as vice president she could set
up certain procedures which the
following vice president would
have to follow.

Laird

clc

-Associated Press
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MELVIN LAIRD answers newsmen's
questions yesterday following a morning meeting with President
Nixon at the Western White House in San Clemente, Calif. David
Packard, deputy secretary of defense; is at left.
ISRAEL MAY ACCEPT:
Arab split widens
o ver U.S. peace plan
By The Associated Press
An Arab split appeared to be widening yesterday over the accept-
ance by Jordan and Egypt of a plan for Middle East peace submitted
by the United States.
About 1,000 youths demonstrated in Amman in protest of the
plan and called President Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt a coward.
The demonstration, in the form of a march, was without incident.
Jordan accepted the peace plan on Sunday but with the reserva-
tion that it could do nothing to halt strikes against Israel by Pales-
tinian guerrillas. The U.S. plan calls for a 90-day cease-fire.
Syria and Iraq kept up their propaganda attacks on the plan.
A broadcast by Radio Baghdad called it "a'n American Trojan
horse in the Middle East, designed to liquidate the Arab rights in

On a day when Nixon an-
nounced a Thursday night
televised press conference in
Los Angeles, his first-ever out-
side Washington, the major em-
phasis at the Western White
House was on taking an over-
all look at Defense Department
operations and the national
economy.
There were two separate meet-
ings in these two separate fields.
There were no following an-
nouncements on a Nixon ses-
sion with top domestic and fin-
ancial consultants. There were
prelude to meetings here today
on the upcoming defense budget
and tomorrow on the domestic
budget.
Laird talked to reporters after
he saw the President, along
with Deputy Defense Secretary
David Packard and presidential
adviser Henry Kissinger. He
said the system of single pack-
age contracts developed in the
preceding Democratic admin-
istrations, permitting programs
that carry on 10- to 15 years,
will no longer be used in order
to give the taxpayer and fin-
ancial operations of the Penta-
gon more protection.
"So before going forward with
a major contract," Laird said.
"'we will be doing considerable
testing, we will fly plenes be-
fore we buy."

DOUBLE FEATURE-STARTS TOMORROW

war cost
SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (U) - S
Laird reported yesterday that the
in Vietnam has been cut about in
about $14.5 billion a year.
Laird told newsmen he was pc
been able to reduce the funding 1
in January of 1969.
He did not specify where the
Laird had conferred with Pre
then said the Pentagon is starting
recommendations in a forthcoming
efficiency of the Defense Depar
planes before buying them. The
panel, will be made public tomorrow

"Not only a brilliant and
absorbing film but also
a superb translation of
the classic itself."
-Judith Crist
"EXTRAORDINARY IN EVERY WAY"
-Archer Winston
"ULYSSES'A SUPERB FILM!"
-life Magazi n

gp~1N N
If-Mg,

a sound investment for
people who count

perfection first

I

"LI KS A VOLT JOLT
FROM THE THIRD
RAIL! Hits even harder
on screen than it did on
the stage."-TIME
THE WALTER REABE ORGANIZATION PRESENTS'
SHIRLEY KNIGHT
AL FREEMAN, JR.
in LEROI
JONES'
DUTCHMN
Based On the Award Winning play
"DUTCHMAN" by Le RoA Wones
PImT BYWma (" oPIELA S I1
4O ONE UNBiED ItSYEARS Of AGE WILL SE AOMITTEO

Palestine."
In Damascus, the official
newspaper Al Baath called the
plan a "horrible plot hatched to
consolidate Israel's existence
and expansion schemes." Later
the government radio said:
"Syria's answer to this so-called
peace bid is a flat no."
An article in the Algiers news-
paper El Moudjahid, which
usually r e f 1 e c t s government
thinking, indicated that Algeria
also would join those Arabs
who rejected the peace plan.
A majority of Israeli Cabinet
ministers are ready to accept
the U.S. peace proposal for the
Middle East with some reserva-
tions, sources close to the gov-
ernment said yesterday.

KU regents vote to
fire black assistant
LAWRENCE, Kan. (Al - The University of Kansas Board
of Regents has ordered the dismissal of a black part-time
assistant to the dean of men.
The order was issued Sunday after Topeka police told
regents that the assistant, Gary Jackson, helped buy 27
boxes of ammunition the day after Rick Dowdell, 19, was
shot to death by a Lawrence policeman.
The shooting of the black KU student touched off a
five-day wave of demonstrations that ended with the fatal
shooting of a white youth, Harry Rice, 19, of Leawood,-Kan.

F
01
W.
ed
eng
tior
F
Defe
Sen
fen
on
gua
syst
pha
D
the
now
$.3
clud
site.
T
viol
star
Se
cha:
Serv
bot
and
H
mak4
that
proj
Lai
mis
mea
T
first
Nix
for
rese
Sa
requ
said
ger
Se
Wis.
spok~
seek
enti
bud
part
stati
syst
no w
nal
4"5
poin
mus
at t
on a
mat
neve
mod
ble t
accu
Pr
jorv
or to
have
ship
the3
longe
exce
the r
Pr
meni
anne
fore
He
"proo
eatin

University officials said
unknown.

FBI

fails

TEAC A-7030 UI
STEREO TAPE DECK $74
10112 INCH REELS ... HALF TRACK STEREO ... 15 IPS
There's only one way to buy a Stereo Tape Deck. Play it by
ear. The TEAC A-7030 U rises to this challenge as nothing
ever has at anywhere near its price. Incomparable excellence
of performance is assured by a host of features. A Symmetri-
cal Control System provides positive operation with foolproof
tape control. Newly designed motors (2 new eddy current
outer rotor motors for reel drive and a 2-speed hysteresis
synchronomous motor for capstan drive) assure completely
stable tape travel and accurate tape speeds. 15 and 7V2 ips
speed, 1 track record, %/l and % track playback, 3-stage
direct-coupled amplifiers, large VU meters, 100 kHz oscilla-
-tor . . . everything for minimal wow and flutter, optimum
frequency response, dynamic range, highest signal-to-noise
ratio. If you're a stereo sophisticate, you'll enjoy an audition.
HI1Fl BUYS
ANN ARBOR-EAST LANSING
618 S. Main 769-4700
'Ouatity Sound Throuoh Quity Eauitoment"

STARTS TOMORROW-"Dutchman," 6:30, 9:45-"Ulysses," 7:30 only

WINNER Of BRACADEMY]
METGOU(;+OtMMAYER rsms
DAVID LEAN'S FILM .
OF BORIS PASTERNAS
IN PANAVISIONAND METROCOLOB

SPWTH AVMNUUAt LIBERV
DOWNTOWN IANN A03
!', INFORMATION 70q-0700

By ERIKA HOFF
FBI agents failed to return to campus yester-
day, contrary to expectations following their
attempt Friday to confiscate property in the
Legal Self-Defense (LSD) office which was al-
legedly stolen from North Hall during the take-
over by students in May.
"Everyone on the case is in Detroit," a spokes-
man at the Ann Arbor FBI office said yesterday.
The spokesman would not explain why the
agents connected with the case had gone to
Detroit, but it was reported earlier yesterday
that the FBI would be holding discussions during
the day with a U.S. attorney to decide what
further action should be taken.
The agents indicated Friday they were at-
tempting to get a search warrant after they
were refused admission without a search war-
rant to the LSD office in the Student Activiofies
Bldg.-
Vice President for Academic Affairs Allan
Smith said yesterday afternoon that, to his
knowledge, the FBI had not yet gotten a search
warrant but said "it is still possible" they might
do so. Smith said he received a call from the
Ann Arbor FBI office yesterday morning, but he

to appear
said the agent only inquired "whether I had
been briefed on the situation."
The chairmen of the three ROTC divisions
on campus said they had not been contacted
by the FBI at all yesterday. E
Colonel Samuel Hannah, chairman ,of Navy
ROTC said he saw one FBI agent and Chief
Security Officer Rolland Gainsley in his office
early Friday morning, but he only "chatted" with
them. Hannah said their conversation did not
concern the investigation of the North Hall oc-
cupation or the attempted confiscation of prop-
erty by the FBI.
When the FBI agents attempted to enter the
LSD office Friday, they said they had informa-
tion that some signal flags and a celestial globe
taken from North Hall were being kept in the
office shared by LSD and the New Mobilization
Committee to End the War in Vietnam.
Michael Radock, vice president for University
relations, said yesterday the University did not
want to "set-a precedent" which might give po-
lice unlimited access to all University offices,
The LSD office, which had been locked since
Friday afternoon, was opened yesterday, but
students continued to keep a 24-hour watch.

Jackson's whereabouts were
A member of the Kansas Board
of Regents said yesterday a mo-
tion to fire E. Laurence Chalm-
ers as chancellor of the Uni-
versity of Kansas failed by one
vote at Sunday's meeting.
Chalmers came to Kansas in
1969 from Florida State Uni-
versity at Tallahassee. He has
been under fire by some regents
and state officials who contend
he did not take strong enough
action last spring when the uni-
versity experienced student dis-
orders and the annual ROTC re-
view was canceled.
Jackson was one of several
black students hired in admin-
istrative posts since the end of
the spring semester to meet de-
mands of the Black Student
Union.
The dean of men, Don Alder-
son, said Jackson's duties dealt
largely with making contact
with young blacks in Lawrence.
The dean said he thought Jack-
son had been doing his job.
University officials said only
persons recommended by the
Black Student Union were hired
for the administrative jobs.
The regents met Sunday, to
try to keep the university from
becoming involved in the dis-
orders.

ENDS TONIGHT
".ZHIVAG O"
one -ow
7:30 only

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan