100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 28, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-28
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



U

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pane Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, July 28, 1970

Tuesday, July 28, 1970

Gov. Milliken signs bill allowing
private citizens to sue polluters

t4GC THEATRE CORPORATION
A NATIONAL GENERAL COMPANY(
FORVILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RD. 769.1300
MON.-FRI. 8:15 ONLY
SAT.-SUN. 1:00-5:00-8:30

LANSING A Gov. Milli-
ken signed yesterday a tough
new antipollution law t h a t
challenges t h e conservation-
conscious to put up or shut up.
The far-reaching law, effec-
tive immediately, permits any-
one to file suit to protect the
air, water and other natural re-
sources, not even the state it-
self is immune from court ac-
tion.
In signing the bill, Milliken
said Michigan is the only state
to have such a law. He urged
other governors to support sim-
ilar legislation in their states.
A similar measure also has been
introduced in Congress.
Under the new law's sweep-
ing provisions, a l o n e citizen

could try to shut down a big
company for contaminating a
waterway; challenge regulations
of state agencies as too lenient
toward industry; or sue a neigh-
bor for fouling the air with a
trash burner.
The possibilities, seemingly,
are endless.
Circuit courts, in addition to
having the power to grant in-
junctions and impose condi-
tions to stop pollution, m a y
even direct governmental units
to upgrade standards it feels
are deficient.
Until now, antipollution ac-
tions could be filed o n 1 y by
those suffering a personal loss.
Even then. they w e r e bound
largely by the decisions of gov-

TV RENTALS
$10 per month
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Neiac TV Rentals
662-5671
SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

ernment at the local or state
agency level.
Under the new law, the mat-
ter can be taken directly to cir-
cuit court. The court may refer
it to an agency, but it also may
handle the case itself and by-,
pass much red tape.
Milliken had pushed for pas-
sage of the bill on a high-prior-
ity basis. The Republican gov-
ernor has been on an antipol-
lution campaign f o r many
months, keying on the release
poisonous substances into Mich-
igan waters.
A scare over mercury contam-
ination led the governor to de-
clare a fishing ban in s o m e
waterways in April.
In addition to the new law
a just signed, he called for Iegis-
lation requiring companies to
disclose the nature and volume
of all discharges and to pay for
state monitoring of the wastes.
The governor claims passage
of the so-called "truth-in-pol-
lution" bill will give Michigan
the finest environmental protec-
tion package in the nation.
Milliken said the new 1 a w
signed yesterday will not be the
total answer to environmental
problems, but will help bring
issues into focus more quickly.
Leon Cohan, deputy attorney
general, said the new law opens
the door to greater prosecution
of pollution cases in a dramatic
way.
He said a team of lawyers in
the attorney general's office has
been concentrating on environ-
mental matters and will find
the new law a helpful tool.

DIAL 662-6264
Corner State & Liberty Sts.
SHOWS AT 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
OPEN 12:45
2nd WEEK
'Planet Of The Apes"was only
the beginning...
WHAT LIES
BENEATH
MAY BE
THE ENO!

WASHINGTON VP) -Despite
attempts to improve its screen-
ing the Pentagon continues to
induct thousands of men with
disqualifying physical defects,
including a man with a missing
kidney and another deformed by
polio, a government report said
yesterday.
Sen. Richard 'S. Schweiker
(R-Pa), released the report by
the Government Accounting Of-
fice (GAO) and called for re-

GEORGE KARL,
(C' SC)TT/ MAIDEN
. o'qr Gi. S Pattc-. " e.e- ar re . ,-y
ilnt1WAI"I'ON

doubled efforts to keep men
with such defects from being
enrolled in the army services.
The report found that in fis-
cal 1968 and 1969 nearly 40,000
servicemen were released with-
in a year of their inductions
because of physical defects that
had gone undetectei during
their examinations.
Twoyears ago a similar GAO
report, also done at Schweiker's
request, found that 40,200 men
were discharged under the same
circumstances in fiscal 1966 and
1967.
"Although I am pleased that
improvements in the inductee
physical examination p r o c e s s
have been made since I received
the 1968 report, the fact that
the over-all rate of such dis-
charges has not changed in-
dicates that these examinations
must be drastically improved,"
Schweiker said.

Makeshift factory
Members of the National Economic Growth and Reconstruction
Organization (NEGRO) package chemical products in a makeshift
factory located in Ellis Island's old ferry building. The chemicals,
mostly. bleach products, are manufactured under a contract with
the General Services Administration. Members of NEGRO first
occupied the abandoned island last week.
IN SECRET VOTE:
House moves to end
own secret balloting

Report asks Pentagon
quality of pre-inductio

DIAL 5-6290
603 E. LIBERTY ST.
NOW SHOWING
SHOWS
AT:
1 :00-3:00-5:00
7:00 & 9:05 P.M.
Box office opens
12:45 P.M.
When they take you
for an out-of-towner,
they realty take you.
4*
PAAOUNTPNCTUMS PMU~NT$
JACK LEMMON SANDY DENNIS
AElSIW STORY
TE OUT-OFTOWERS
COORFMOv'XLAa A PAAA. MkO F 10

Heavy Duty Steering
and Suspension Parts
" BALL JOINTS
* IDLER ARMS
* tIE ROD ENDS

The GAO report said it had
cost $17.9 million in the 1969
fiscal year to pay and outfit the
men covered in the latest report.
It noted improved screening
practices including specialized
training for medical officers,
upgrading of facilities, and a
project to develope a prototype
automated examination facility.

I

I

I

I

I

The Fabulous
J. C. HEARD
Any conversation concerning all great Jazz musicians will in-
clude a name that is synonymous with the highest caliber of
traditional jazz drum players J. C. Heard. Listing Woody
Herman, Benny Goodman and Count Basie as representative
greats that J. C. Heard has played with and will serve as a
preview to the countless credits you will find here.
J. C. Heard: The singer---The dancer-The talker-The drum-
mer, this is the performance of TODAY or of "TODAY'S GOOD
EVENING ENTERTAINMENT."4
OPEN 11 A.M.
SERVING BUSINESSMEN'S LUNCHES

MICHIGAN REPERTORY ' 70
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
BORN YESTERDAY
an American comedy classic !
OPENS TONIGHT!.
Performances thru Sat., Aug. 1

I

WASHINGTON (AP) - The
House voted yesterday to permit
by-passing of a parliamentary
gimmick which has allowed se-
cret voting on many major mat-
ters.
It wrote into a congressional
reorganization bill a provision
for a printed public record of
how members vote on amend-
ments considered while the
House sits as a committee of the
whole.
Much legislation is approved
or beaten that way, by teller
votes, with no record votes al-
lowed but with members being
counted only by number.
The provision added to the
reorganization bill would allow
a minimum or 20tmembers to
force a record vote when the
House rejects or adopts amend-
ments to bills.
Heretofore, it ias been pos-
sible to force record votes on
amendments adopted but not

14 S. Fourth Ave.
761-3548

Open Seven Days
Mondays-Friday
II a.m. to 2 am.
Saturday and Sunday
S P.m. to 2 a.m.

I

I

SPEND A GALA EVENING WITH

on defeated amendments--which
often are of greater import than
those adopted.
The decision -to end the any-
nymous voting was on a voice
vote with members not recorded
by name for the time being. A
roll-call vote is scheduled before
final action on the bill, probably
late today.
The entire bill then will go
to the Senate and will not be-
come law before next January
if it eventually gets to the White
House and is signed by Presi-
dent Nixon.
The successful arive to remove
the cloak of secrecy from some
major House voting came as the
third week of debate got under
way.
Previously the House had
voted to open committee hear-
ings to restricted radio and tele-
vision broadcasting and to re-
quire committees to make pub-
lic any record votes taken be-
hind closed doors and now kept
secret in most cases.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
,gan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
ity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier. $5 by mail.
WOW!
A three -piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinner, plus french fries,
for only 79c! Larger take-home
oMom
orasofarbox sn!
West of Arborlond

INDIA IIENIELSSOHN THEATRE

8:00 P.M.
Next Week: JOE EGG

a

't

w

h.

r

Box Office:

668-6300

SE

p

TO

HARTA

P
r
i

the rugged denim dress shirt
by Creighton Shirtmakers.. .

TWO BANDS
Bill Thomas Quintet
Steve Head and the Cosmiccow
with Jesse Crawford, MC
Huron High School Cafeteria, 8:30 P.M. to 1:00 A.M.
Tickets at the door, or call 662-7747

T

fashion impact for fall 70, the new long
4-inch Calcutto collar, 2 button cuff with
contrast top stitching. . .all in colorful
permanent press Fortrel polyester/cotton.

Blue, red or gold. 9.50

.

MEN'S SHOP
Liberty at Maynard

Students for Hart

Washtenaw Friends of Senator Hart

I m

m I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan