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July 24, 1970 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-24

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i

Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, July 24, 1970

CHIEFS WON'T PRACTICE

All-Star

ZZI P

Mfrligi~a

:43 rt

game

Vol. LXXX, No. 52-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Friday, July 24, 1970 Ten Cents

hit

by

W

WASHINGTON (4) - The National
Football League Players Association de-
cided yesterday against letting the Kan-
sas City Chiefs report to training camp
as the Federal Mediation and Concilia-
tion Service announced both sides in
the pro football contract dispute had
agreed to meet today.
The NFLPA decision not to let the
world champion Chiefs start practicing
for the July 31 College All-Star Game
put the future of the annual charity
event in serious jeopardy. NFL owners
had offered to lift the lockout of the
Chiefs' camp in order to save the game.
Federal mediators said both the own-
ers' negotiating committee and the
NFLPA had agreed to sit down today in
Philadelphia and resume contract talks,
which have been stalemated over 10
days.
The announcement from the Federal
Mediation and Conciliation Service
came after planned meetings at its of-
fices in Washington and Baltimore had
fallen through,
John Mackey, president of the play-
ers' association, said the other teams in
the league also had shown their firm

boycott
stand by reaffirming their support of
the association.
Mackey, said the players were ready
to sit- with the owners day and night to
resolve any differences as soon as pos-
sible.
Owners of the 26 NFL teams earlier
had said they wanted the talks held in
the New York area, and described the
stalemated negotiations as "days and
possibly weeks apart."
George Halas of the Chicago Bears
and ~Lamar Hunt of the Kansas City
Chiefs, presidents respectively of the
National and American conferences, had
said the Kansas City camp would be
opened immediately if the players asso-
ciation directed Chiefs' players to re-
port.
Most of the NFL teams have begun
practices for rookies, but experienced
players have been locked out of camp
by the owners and forbidden by the
players' association from reporting to
camp.
The main contract disagreement is
over payments into the players' pension
fund. The two sides reportedly are more
than $17 million apart over a four-year
contract.

S E

TE

APPROI

'ES
GTO'

BILL ,FO

SHI

i

-Associated Press

CI

7 e o

BENGAL BATS MORIBUND

Je~jteP

A. LEE KIRK,

The above picture .

. .

... makes me sick

Twins
By The Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL
George Mitterwald's 405-foot
home run carried Bert Blyleven,
the major league's youngest
player, and the Minnesota Twins
to a four-hit, 2-1 victory over
the Detroit Tigers last night.
Mitterwald, who also had two
MORE NEAT SPORTS
See Page 11
singles, connected off Joe Niek-
ro, 10-8, for the tie-breaking
run in the seventh inning that
gave the 19-year-old Blyleven
his fourth victory.
The Twins had tied the game
1-1 on Rich Reese's single and
a two-base error. Harmon Kil-

THE NOTED sociologist David Riesman has argued that you
can tell a lot about a nation from the way they treat their
children. He feels that the United States has, for most of its
194 years, baen a child-oriented society, a society in which
parents would work not so much to better themselves, but rather
one in which the thrust of the parents' labor was directed
towards insuring a better life for their kids. If the above
picture is any indication, those days are on the wane and
indeed already may have passed.
The bright-eyed and bushy-tailed pussycat in the
above picture is not standing in for Ronald Reagan in a
Cecil B. DeMille epic saga of the old west. Poor old Tom
has just found out that he has won the fashion show seg-
ment of the 1970 All-American Glamour Kitty Pageant
in Miami Beach, and, judging from his expression, he
couldn't really give a damn.
The picture, I fear, can hardly do justice to the truly osten-
tatious red, white and blue cowboy outfit Tom didn't choose
to go with his slightly shrunk 10-gallon hat. And because
Tom's owners are from Dallas, Tom's outfit is given added
splendor by a Lone Star of Texas immaculately embroidered
on his back.
After watching a few beauty pageants where the contest-
ants are described as -if they were cattle, I am beginning to
share the disgust with these events so forcefully expressed by
women's liberation. But who, pray tell, is going to stand up for
Tom? When a poor simple kittycat is put in such an unnatural
condition, is it any wonder that animal psychiatry is becoming
a legitimate business? Who will speak for those who can only
meow and bark?
The love given Tom and thousands of pets like him by
owners who flaunt the little dears in countless shows is a
sick and selfish love. Cats and dogs are neither things nor
people, they are but animals, unperturbed with a moral
sense. The love that a pet can give his owner is a simple
one, and the demands he makes upon his owner are few
and unseflish.
When Tom was a small kitten, his heart was pure and
unspoiled. But now, Tom is probably something of a sourpuss.
It just isn't natural to dress a cat up like a Barbie doll and
expose him to multitudes of curious people, bright lights and
flashbulbs. A love that bends and shapes its object is really
no love at all.
Any society that can crush the love of something so simple
as a cat or a dog would logically have great trouble in under-
standing something as complicated as the love of a child.
To love a child is not always an easy thing, but it is the com-
plexity of this love that makes it that much more rewarding
than loving a pet, providing that the child is loved for what he
is.
And as for Tom, he'll just have to put up with it-little
realizing that, just like the rest of us, all he really needs is love.

trip

by

lebrew then dribbled a slow
grounder to first and Detroit
first baseman Norm Cash's
throw home was too late.
Jim Northrup powered the
Tigers to a 1-0 sixth inning lead
with his 18th homer.
The Holland - born rookie
struck out seven and walked
three Tigers.
** *
Oy! 20 straight
KANSAS CITY - The Balti-
more Orioles beat the Kansas
City Royals for the 20th con-
secutive time, 5-4, last night on
Frank Robinson's two-run homer
and sacrifice fly and rookie Ron
Grich's decisive triple.
The Orioles, who lost their

igers
first game against the new Roy-
als last season and then won 11
in a row, have beaten Kansas
City nine times this season, pull-
ing within one of the major
league record of 21 set by the
New York Yankees against the
St. Louis Browns in 1927.
, * * *
Pirates gain
PITTSBURGH - Dave Cash,
who tripled in a run and scored
in a three-run second inning,
capped a three-run eighth with
a sacrifice fly and the Pitts-
burgh Pirates overcame the At-
lanta Braves 6-5 last night.
Pepitone to
sing on TV
NEW YORK (P) -- Wander-
ing Astro Joe Pepitone will
make his television singing de-
but on the Merv Griffin Show
Monday, CBS announced yes-
terday.
Network spokesmen didn't
specify what song the retired
ballplayer would croon, but one
said: "You can bet it won't be
TPm Wild About Harry,"' a less
than veiled reference to Hous-
ton Manager Harry Walker.

-Associated Pi
Lawrence fuineral procession
Some 200 black persons follow a horse drawn wagon through the streets of Lawrence, Kansas yesterday which bears t
body of Donald Rick Dowdell, 19, to a church funeral. Dowdell was the first of two youths killed during a week of d
turbances in this university city. Private services were set later yesterday in Kansas City, Mo. for Harry Nicholas Ri
19, killed Monday night during a confrontation between police and a group of young persons near the campus area.
WANTED IN ANN ARBOR BOMBING:

'ress
the
is-
ice,

Plum ondon,

two others

WASHIl
year of co
passed a 1
the Distric
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But Sen.
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Tydings sale
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convicted c
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18 to 16 th
cused of n
robbery an
be tried as I

COMMONWEALTH GAMES

~'M' student takes first

EDINBURGH (P) - Bill Ken-
nedy, a student at the Univer-
sity of Michigan, led Canada to
a near-sweep of the gold medals
in last night's swimming and
diving events by winning the
100 - meter backstroke in a
Games record time of 1:01.65.
Canada's Toomas Arusee cap-
tured t h e 200-meter butterfly
and Beverly Boys won the wo-
men's highboard diving.
In action yesterday afternoon,
Marilyn Neufville, a 17-year-old
London schoolgirl from Jamai-
ca, set a world record of 51 sec-
onds flat for the women's 400
meters at the British Common-
wealth Games and then refused
to say a word about it. She sat
with her team manager, Nor-
man Hill, at a bizarrenews con-
ference and just silently shook
her head at every question.
Miss Neufville has been a fig-
ure of controversy since she de-
cided to run for Jamaica in the
games. She has competed for
Britain in international match-
es but defied British officials
and missed a meet against East
Germany in order to train with
the Jamaican team.
Hill said, "She is very tense
and since her future position is
in doubt she doesn't want to put
hier foot in It."

The Jamaican girl knocked
seven tenths of a second off the
record, jointly held by French
girls Nicole Ducies and Colette
Besson.
It was the first track a n d
field world record of the Games,
which saw Games records con-
tinue to fall in both track and
swimming.

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Major League Standings

;
z:

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

Baltimore
Detroit
New York
Boston
Cleveland
Washington

W
60
53 ?
51
49
44
43
West

L
36
41
43
45
50
52

Pct.
.625
.564
.543
.521
.468
.453

GB
6
8
10
15
16%

Minnesota 59 31 .657 -
California 57 39 .594 5
Oakland 51 44 .537 10%
Kansas City 34 59 .366 27
Milwaukee 34 62 .354 28
Chicago 33 65 .337 30
Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 5, Kansas City 4
Minnesota 2, Detroit 1
California 4, Boston 1
Cleveland 5, Chicago 2
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 2, twi-night
New York at Oakland
Washington at California
Boston at Milwaukee
Baltimore at Minnesota
Kansas City at Cleveland, 2, twi-night

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East
W L Pct.
Pittsburgh 54 43 .557
New York 50 44 .532
Chicago 48 46 .511
Philadelphia 43 50 .462
St. Louis 41 54 .431
Montreal 40 55 .421
West
Cincinnati 67 30 .691
Los Angeles 55 39 .585
Atlanta 46' 48 .489
San Francisco 44 48 .478
Houston 43 53 .448
,San Diego 39 59 .398
Yesterday's Results
Pittsburgh 6, Atlanta 5
Chicago 1, Cincinnati 0
Houston 3, St. Louis 2
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
San Francisco at Montreal, 2,
twi-night
Los Angeles at New York
San Diego at Philadelphia
Atlanta at Chicago, day
Houston at Pittsburgh
St. Louis at Cincinnati

arreste6
By PHILIP HERTZ
White Panther Party Minister of De-
fense, Lawrence "Pun" Plamondon, want-
ed by the Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion in connection with the bombing of
the Ann Arbor Central Intelligence Office
in September, 1968, was arrested early
yesterday afternoon by Michigan state
police near St. Ignace.
Plamondon, currently on the FBI's ten
most wanted list, was charged with car-
rying a concealed weapon At the time of
his apprehension, he was accompanied by
Milton "Skip" Taube,' White Panther'
Party Minister of Defense, and John W.
Forest, Detroit Region Minister of Edu-
cation for the party. According to a
spokesman for the Michigan State Police,
Taube and Forest are also being held on
the concealed weapons charge.
Forest is also under indictment in the
bombing case, but he was arrested and
released on bail when the Detroit grand
jury handed down the indictment against
him Oct. 8.
The arrest of Plamondon came about
quite by accident. The three men were
driving in.the Cheboygan area when they
were stopped and given a warning for
littering, after one of the men threw a
can of beer out of their car window. At
the time of this encounter, Taube and
Forest gave their their real names. Pla-
mondon used an alias.

in

St.

Police then put out a tracer, and when
the three were identified, a bulletin was
issued to apprehend them. Police at the
Newberry post of the state police and the
Mackinac County Sheriff's department
arrested them at about 1:30 p.m. fifty
miles West of St. Ignace
A derringer was found on Plamondon,
leading to the concealed weapons' charge.
Panther Minister of Information Ken

Ign ace
Kelley called the carrying concealed wea-
pons' charge, "a ruse," adding that
neither Taube nor Forest were carrying
weapons. Kelley added that Taube would
probably be held on a charge of aiding
and abetting a federal fugitive, a felony,
carrying a maximum penalty of 10 years
and a $10,000 fine.
State police indicated that no such
charge had been lodged and could only
be lodged by the FBI.
The FBI has refused to comment on
any aspect of the arrest.
A statement issued by Kelley indicated
that the three men, currently being held
in the Mackinac County Jail, would be
moved to Wayne County Jail and ar-
raigned there today. However, neither the
State Police nor the FBI would confirm
the report.
Kelley said he feared ball for Plamon-
don could be set as high as $100,000 or
$200,000.
State Polilce said that Plamondon ad-
ditionally has outstanding narcotics
charges against him in New Jersey, Il-
linois and Michigan. and also is wanted
in Michigan on obscenity charges.
State Police said that federal treasury
departments agents also have a federal
warrant charging him with furnishing
false information to gun dealers for putr-
chasing firearms.

GB
2/
4%
9
11
13
10%
20
20%
23%
28%

-Daily-Richard Lee
Pun Plamondon-

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