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July 11, 1970 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-11

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'4 4 14. I

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I 4

h4t 1Mfrhigan Dail
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The MichionuDalv express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all rerints
News Phone: 764-0552
Inviting o1frontation
AT TIMES ONE begins to wonder whether or not the
Administration of this University actually seeks out
confrontation.
Take, for example, the LSA sit-in case. It was clear
that there was a need for a student owned and operated
bookstore. The Administration however refused to ack-
nowledge this need until 107 people had been arrested,
and many more injured by the police.
The Black Action Movement (BAM) led student strike
provides another example of the University refusing to
rationalize, despite frequent attempts by BAM leaders,
until a confrontation situation had developed.
AT THE MOMENT the two major issues facing the Ad-
ministration are the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) re-
quest for the University to provide space for a midwestern
conference on homosexuality, and Womens Liberation's
request for a permanent day care center for children.
President Fleming denied the GLF request on the
grounds that to meet it might have led to a deterioration
of the University's public image.
In fact, it seems likely that if the conference had tak-
en place it would have been largely ignored by the general
public, the legislature and the press.
The situation as it stands now is one where the Pres-
ident is unable to acquiesce to the request on the grounds
that to do so might lead to a loss of face on his behalf.
The result of this action might well be a confrontation
that will almost certainly do more harm to the Univer-
sity's image than the granting of the original request
could ever have done. And, the conference will be held
over President Fleming's objections.
The case of the proposed permanent Day Care Cen-
ter is interesting. The proposed center is not an issue
that should provoke burning controversy, the space and
the money could easily be found. Even campus radicals
are not hell-bent on forcing an issue out of the matter.
But, instead of recognizing that a day care center is nec-
essary if women are to have equal opportunity in the
University community, Fleming continues to place ob-
stacles in its path. A confrontation seems highly prob-
able.
IT IS EXPECTED that there will always be differences
between the University administration and the rest of
the University community,, but it is also expected that
these would stem from broader issues, perhaps ROTC and
war research, not the basic issues of civil liberty and equal
opportunity.
If the University wishes to instill confidence in its
role as a bastion of liberty and academia then it should
immediately cease its discrimination against homosexuals
and women, as well as other minority groups. By refusing
GLF a conference and women a permanent day care cen-
ter, the University is inviting unnecessary confrontation.
-JONATHAN MILLER
Bigger in Texas y
EVERYTHING IS bigger and better in Texas, the old
legend goes. Tell a Texan you have a farm with some
cattle, and he'll tell you his beef back in Dallas are twice
as big as yours.
Maybe so and maybe not. But a few days ago Texas
probably took the unchallenged prize for the biggest
prison sentence yet.
A jury deliberated 20 minutes before ordering An-
tonio Rodriguez, convicted for possessing and selling
heroin, to spend 1,500 years in prison. Rodriguez is not
alone, however. As he is aging in prison he'll be joined by
three other convicts, two sentenced to 1,001 and 1,000
years for rape and another sentenced to 1,000 years for
robbery and assault.

But Rodriguez can cheer up. Maybe he'll be parolled,
after a paltry 500 or 600 years.
N C.
NIGHT EDITOR: LINDSAY CHANEY
Summer Business Staff
IAN WRIGHT. .............................. ......Business Manager
PHYLLIS HURWITZ ................... . ...... Freshman Supplement C
BARBARA SCHULZ....... . ..... ................. Display Advertising
RICHARD RADCLIFFE.........................Classified Advertising
DAVID BELL..... . ...................................irculaion
ASSISTANTS: Suzi Boschan, Debby Moore
Summer Sports Staff
People's Summer Sports Editors
PAT ATKINS LEE KIRKr

Independence declaration

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is sponsored by the
National Committee of Black Churchmen.)
N THE BLACK COMMUNITY, July 4, 1970 a
declaration by concerned Black Citizens of the
United States of America in B 1 a c k Churches,
Schools, Homes, Community Organizations and
Institutions assembled:
When in the course of Human Events, it be-
comes necessary for a People who were stolen
from the lands of their Fathers, transported un-
der the most ruthless and brutal circumstances
5,000 miles to a strange land, sold into dehuman-
izing slavery, emasculated, subjugated, exploited
and discriminated against for 351 years, to call,
with finality, a halt to such indignities and geno-
cidal practices - by virtue of the Laws of Na-
ture and of Nature's God, a decent respect to the
Opinions of Mankind requires that they should
declare their just grievances and the urgent and
necessary redress thereof.
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that
all Men are not only created equal and endowed
by their Creator with certain unalienable rights
among which are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of
Happiness, but that when this equality and these
rights are deliberately and consistently refused,
withheld or abnegated, men are bound by self-
respect and honor to rise up in righteous Indigna-
tion to secure them. Whenever any Form of Gov-
ernment, or any variety of established traditions
and systems of the Majority becomes destructive
of Freedom and of legitimate Human Rights, it is
the Right of the Minorities to use every necessary
and accessible means to protest and to disrupt
the machinery of Oppression, and so to bring
such general distress and discomfort upon the op-
pressor as to the offended Minorities shall seem
most appropriate and most likely to effect a prop-
er adjustment of the society.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that'such bold
tactics should not be initiated for light and tran-
sient Causes; and, accordingly, the Experience of
White America has been that the descendents of
the African citizens brought forcibly to t h e s e
shores, and to the shores of the Caribbean Islands,
as slaves, have been patient long past what can
be expected of any human beings so affronted.
But when a long train of Abuses and Violence,
pursuing invariably the same Object, manifests a
Design to reduce them under Absolute Racist
Domination and Injustice, it is their Duty rad-
ically to confront such Government or system of
traditions, and to provide, under the aegis of Le-
gitimate Minority Power and Self Determination,
for their present Relief'and future Security. Such
has been the patient Sufferance of Black People
in the United States of America; and such is now
the Necessity which constrains them to address
this Declaration to Despotic White Power, and
to give due notice of their determined refusal to
be any longer silenced by fear or flattery, or to be
denied justice. The history of the treatment of
Black People in the United States is a history
having in direct Object the Establishment and
Maintenance of Racist Tyranny over this People.
To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid
World.
THE UNITED STATES has evaded Compliance
to laws the most wholesome and necessary for our
Children's education.
The-United States has caused us to be isolated
in the most dilapidated and unhealthful sections
of all cities.
The United States has allowed election dis-
tricts to be so gerrymandered that Black People
find the right to Representation in the Legisla-
tures almost impossible of attainmelt.
The United States has allowed the dissolution
of school districts controlled -by Blacks when
Blacks opposed with manly Firmness the white
man's Invasions on the Rights of our People.
The United States has erected a Multitude of
Public Agencies and Offices,. and sent into our
ghettos Swarms of Social Workers, Officers and
Investigators to harass our People, and eat out
their Substance to feed the Bureaucracies.
The United States has kept in our ghettos, in
Times of Peace, Standing Armies of Police, State
Troopers and National Guardsmen, without the
consent of our People.

The United States has imposed Taxes upon us
without protecting our Constitutional Rights.
The United States has constrained our Black
sons taken Captive in its Armies, to bear arms
against their black, brown and yellow Brothers,
to be the Executioners of these Friends and Breth-
ren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.
THE EXPLOITATION AND INJUSTICE of
the United States have incited domestic Insur-
rections among us, and the United States has en-
deavored to bring on the inhabitants of our ghet-
tos, the merciless Military Establishment, whose
known R u le of control is an undistinguished
shooting of all Ages, Sexes and Conditions of
Black People:
For being lynched, burned, tortured, harried,
harassed and imprisoned without just cause.
For being gunned down in the streets, in our
churches, in our homes, in our apartments and
on our campuses, by Policemen and Troops who
are protected by a mock Trial, from Punishment
for any Murders which they commit on the In-
habitants of our Communities.
For creating, through Racism and bigotry, an
unrelenting Economic Depression in the Black
Community which wreaks havoc upon our men
and disheartens our youth.
For denying to most of us equal access to the
better Housing and Education- of the land.
For having desecrated and torn d o w n our
humblest dwelling places, under the Pretense of
Urban Renewal, without replacing them at costs
which we can afford.
The United States has denied our personhood
by refusing to teach our heritage, and the mag-
nificent contributions to the 1i f e, wealth and
growth of this Nation which have been made by
Black People.
IN EVERY STAGE OF THESE Oppressions
we have Petitioned for Redress in the most humb-
le terms: Our repeated Petitions have been an-
swered mainly by repeated Injury. A Nation,
whose Character is thus marked by e v e r y act
which may define a Racially Oppressive Regime,
is unfit to receive the respect of a Free People.
Nor have we been wanting in attentions to our
White Brethren. We have warned them from time
to time of Attempts by their Structures of Power
to extend an unwarranted. Repressive Control ov-
er us. We have reminded them of the Circum-
stances of our Captivity and Settlement here. We
have appealed to their vaunted Justice and Mag-
nanimity, and we have abjured them by the Ties
of our Common Humanity to disavow these In-
justices, which, would inevitably interrupt our
Connections and Correspondence. They have been
deaf to the voice of Justice and of Humanity. We
must, therefore, acquiesce in the Necessity, which
hereby announces our Most Firm Commitment
to the Liberation of Black People, and hold the
Institutions, Traditions and Systems of the Unit-
ed States as we hold the rest of the societies of
Mankind, Enemies when Unjust and Tyrannical;
when Just and Free, Friends.
WE, THEREFORE, THE BLACK PEOPLE of
the United States of America, in all parts of this
Nation, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the
World for the Recitude of our Intentions, do, in
the Name of our good People and our own Black
Heroes - Richard Allen, James Varick, Absalom
Jones, Nat Turner, Frederick Douglass, Marcus
Garvey, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr., and
all Black People past and present, great and small
- Solemnly Publish and Declare, that we shall
be, and of Right ought to be, free and indepen-
dent from the injustice, exploitative control, in-
stitutionalized violence and racism of white Amer-
ica, that unless we receive full Redress and Re-
lief from these Inhumanities we will move to re-
nounce all Allegiance to this Nation, and will re-
fuse, in every way, to cooperate with the Evil
which is Perpetrated upon ourselves and our
Communities. And for the support of this Dec-
laration, with a firm Reliance on the Protection
of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each
other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred
Honor.

2for Direct ClasPsified Ad SPhone 76
12Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

FOR RENT
AUGUS TOCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets. storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest. Ctc
CAMPUS-Reduced charming panelled,
carpeted 2 room suite. Very attrac-
tively furnished. $90/mo. Available
now. Lease thru Aug. or longer.
883-5666 or 971-6270. Ctc
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Walls St.-Furnished, new, modern
efficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom available.
1-864-3852 or 665-7273. 1lCtc
1 OR 2 NEEDED to take over lease for
Sept.-May. Beautiful bi-level. Call
769-7467 after 5. 25045
FOR FALL: modern 2-man, close to
campus, 663-3890. - 24C43
ROOMS FOR RENT for rest of summer
and some available for fall term.
769-6637. 23C44
FURNISHED-FALL RENTAL
1 and 2 Bedroom Apts.
1111 S. State
1506 Packard
1-864-3852. 353-7389 or

FOR RENT
AVAIL. FOR SUMMERt, & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
pn. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. llCtc
1 AND 2 BDRM. f.rn. units for fall, 1
bdrm. $155 and $160. 2 bdrm.from
$210 for 2, from $225 for 3. Call 663-
1761. 15C44
Campus-Hospital.
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
3-BDRM. HOUSE, available Aug. 15,
North Campus, on 2 acres land. 665-
6390, ANYTIME after 2 p.m. persis-
tently. 13Ctc

HELP WANTED
WANTED: undergraduate to assist pro-
fessor (in Wheelchair) in return for
room and board, 761-9034 after 5.
3H44
ART STUDENTS= who are now taking,
or have recently taken painting
courses wanted for psych experiment.
Total time will be about 2 hours,
spread over 3 testing sessions, pay
$2.50/hr. Call David Shapiro, days,
429-2531, or eves., 663-9769, to set up
appt. 50H41
INTERESTED IN GIVING TOURS OF
Central Campus? Prospective Univer-
sity of Michigan students and their
families are eager to be shown the
campus. If you have a spare hour a
week to volunteer .your services,
please pall Betty van den Mtsch at
the Alumni Association - 764-0384-
between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or
call John Hamilton at 761-7808 in the
evenings. 61143
FOR SALE
BOX SPRINGS and mattress. CHEAP.
1 yr. old, call Joe, 426-3440. - 14'B47

UNCONTRACTED C

LINES 1 day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1,55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2.40
10 2.60
INCHES
1 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 10.70

2 days
1.60
2.15
-2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4.95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35
21.10

3 dos
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55
31.40

4
1
3:
41

Additional costs per day after six d
Ads that are 11/, 212, 31/2, etc
average of the lower and higher

SELL YOURSELF
on Daily classifieds
764-0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557

- - - - - --2. --Z - .0U L'- - --- - - - - -
761-2366 after 5. 12 NEWLY Panelled single rooms for men,
12Ctc 3nblocks from Engin. Arch. Available
Anow. 663-9530. 2645
APTS. LOCATOR, $12.50, Summer and,!

DB i

761-7764. 22C48{
2 BDRM. FURNunits on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 15Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-1
6448. 50Ctc
CAMPU S-HOSPITAL REDUCED, attrac-
tive paneled small furn. firsttfloor
room for man or woman, 21 or over,
house refrigerator. $10.50/wk. Lease
through Aug. 663-5666 or 971-6270.
19Ctc
FURN. APT,for rent 'til Aug. 20. 2250
Fuller Rd. 663-9576 eves. 16045j
SINGLE ROOM. 428 Cross St. AA. $5,
663-3886. 21C43
CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAH LMANN
APARTMENTS-
545 CHURCH ST.
761 -7600
380tc
Summit
Associates

911 S. Forest
Near Hill St.-Modern 2 Bdrm., 3-man.
668-6906. Fall.. 14Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
lOCtc
Apartments
Limited
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENTS FOR FALLj

663-051 1'
761-5440
5OCtc
USED CARS
1963 FORD ECONOLINE. Stereo, car-
peted, paneled, new engine, $00.65-
5498. . 15N43
VENERABLE PEUGEOT, $50. 761-8855.
14N4E
1962 CONTINENTAL-as is. $150. Needs
wheels and fuel pump; otherwise in
good shape Call 663-3482 or 663-5512.
ND4C
PORSCHE-1965 Coupe. 35,000 miles, ex-
cellent except for some rust. $2300 or
best offer. 662-0309. 11N46
COMPACT luxury sedan, 1968 Triumph

DB I
DROPLEAF TABLE, 4 chairs, dresser,
man's bureau, twin bed. 761-4949,
10845
DIVING GEAR
All major brands at discount prices,
Ann Arbor Diver's Co., call Mike Wills.
665-6032 persistently noons or after 5
best, 711 Arch, No. 301. 7B45
VOLVO 144S 1968-4-speed, AM radio,
plus set of snow tires, about 21,000
miles, very fine condition. Asking
about $2,000. Call 761-0153 after 5:30
or leave a messagt at 764-4404. BD43
SUMMER SUBLET
SUBLET-Roommate needed ink4-man_
apt., A/C, color TV. $10/wk., now
thru August. Call 668-7626. 8U45
4TH GIRL wanted for July-Aug., im-
mediate occupancy, great location.
Call 769-2249. 9U44
ROOMMATE needed July-Aug., own
bedroom in charming house. 761-7219.
7U43
OWN BDRM. in large 5 rm. apt., close
to campus, available now. 662-9833.
5U44I
ROOM FOR MEN ONLY
$35-Call 668-6906.
4U4
SUMMER RENTALS
Choice Apts. at low rates. Ann Arbor
' rust Co. Phone 769-2800. 22083
SUMMER SUBLETS
'761 -8055
4Utc
BUSINESS SERVICES
THESES, PAPERS (in. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERIENCED secretary desires typing
in her home or part time in your of-
fice. Call 971-1533. 27J43
DON'T YOU justV hatem to type? Let
Candy do it. Cheap, quick, profes-
sional. Call 665-4830. JD44
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric,
Call Jeanette,971-2463. l2Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE 1
call -
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-11871
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Ple
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery 1
Available
Prompt Service1
CALL 485-2086

TICKETS
RETURN TICKET
Sell, buy, go, smirk, hello, work-
your ticket to returns is through
Daily Classifieds, 764-0557, 11 am.-
2 p.m. DQ
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED: Furnished Apt., 1 or 2 bed-
rooms, A/C, Univ. Prof. attending
ISR 7/28-8/21. Write Dr. Cohen, C/O
Lucksen, 1176 Lydig Ave., Bx,, N.Y.
10461 19L47
2 MEN need place in house near cam-
pus, now. Rent negot. thmu end of
Aug. Call 761-7504. 18L43
SINGLE APT., normal facilities, for
July-Aug., preferably near campus.
Please reply Box 378, Mich. Daily.
DLtc
LOST AND FOUND
LOST July 8, Black and white cos-
metic case, Union or Canterbury
House, REWARD, E. Hauser, 231
Berkeley Pl, Bklyn,, N.Y. 11217.
20A43
FOUND-1 large peanut eating rabbit.
769-5661, Jack. AD44
LOST-Seal-point Siamese female, age
2 yr., July 8. $20 Reward. Call Diane,
769-5695, after 5 or 764-0411 during
the day. 18A46
LOST?? or stolen!! !-12 speed boy's
racing bike. RED, very small frame;
make: Legnano. Any information call
Nancy, 761-0153. AD43
PHOTO SUPPLIES
AT CENTURY
The Best in
Good Used Cameras
WE BUY, SELL, TRADE
Everything Photographic
DARKROOM SUPPLIES
LUMINOUS PAPER
Repairs on all makes
Century Camera
(At our new location)
4254 N. Woodward, Royal Oak
Between 13 and 14 Mile Rd.
LI 9-6355
Take I-94 to Southfield Expr North to
13 Mile Road-then East to
Woodward and North
(MI'higan Bank, Security and Diner
Charges accepted)
1lUt,
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
WANTED- Used girl's 3-spd, bike. 761-
4309. 24Z43
HONDA REPAIRS, TUNE-UPS, OVER-
HAULS. Reasonably done, guaran-
teed, 1 day service, 665-5479. 25Z51
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26Z71

I
F
F
L
F
I
I
V
I
F
ti
,.,
E
I
'A

CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FA L L

1
ii

2000. $895. 761-9180 or 663-9831. 10N43
761-8055 VW, 1966-Red conver. Radio, good con-
49Ctc dition. Best offer. 971-0420 after 6
- p 971-3708. 12N47
711 ARCH-Near State and Packard- 66 FORD Galaxdgm0,a-d.,xoer
Modern 2-bdrm. apts. for Fall. Dish-'6 FOD Glx 50,2d.poe
washer, balcony, air-cond., and much brakest boffer. and663 mileage exellen.
more. Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Ctc
BARGAIN CORNER '63 DODGE DART in excellent cond.,
$275. Stop by 425 West Washington.
-m____________________ND45

I-

r _

Letters to the Editor

i

Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS?
VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims 6 50,
Button-Fly 6.50
Traditional...... . 6.98.'
Bells 7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS.........2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's......6.98
Nuvo's .... ... 8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock.!
Sam's Store
'122 E. Washington

Ii

KLH MODEL 11 portable stereo, 2 yrs.
old. Like new. 769-0988. 12X43
"NEW 15" loudspeakers $20 es. or 6
for $90. New and used ARB sound sys-
tem equipment and parts. 6780 Jack-
son Rd. 13X471
GARRARD SL65 automatic turntable
with base and dust cover. Shure M93E3
cartridge. $60 or best offer. Call 761-
5201. XD48
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Instruments and accessories, new and;
used. Lessons, repairs. 209. State.
665-8001. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. X
AKAI 1800 SD Cartridge Tape Record-
er plus accessories, reel-to-reel, reel-
to-cartridge, 4 -speeds, auto. shut-off.
$350. Lou Hudson, 761-1345, after 6.
11X43
TRANSPORTATION
RESTLESS JUNIOR GUY seeking trav-
eling companion for overland trip
thru Europe, Africa, India, and Japan,
Leaving Sept. 8, call Patrick, 761-4326
eves. 45G44.
PLEASE HELP 2 chicks and baby move
out west, can leave anytime, can drive
and help pay for gas: Please call
Mary, 662-3364. 44G44

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS

'67 HONDA 90 step-through, only 1900
miles, 2 baskets, 2 helmets, $190.769-
4289. 27Z44E
FOR SALE - Suzuki 55 in excellent
condition. Call 662-3116 between 5
and 8 p.m 23Z44
468 OSSA $75. needs some work. Call
453-8623.,7ZD481

ROOMMATES WANTED

i
I

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted, near
law quad, own room available, rent
$45. Call 663-6828. YD44

'=F
+_
a

Clarification-
To the Editor:
In your article on the Court of
Appeals decision concerning stu-
dent voting rights (Daily, June
24) you quote me as stating that a
student doesn't care about the
City where he goes to school and
shouldn't be allowed to influence
City elections. This statement was
made in response to a questiorni as

to why I thought the State Legis-
lature passed a statute making It
difficult for students, to vote in
college towns. It does not state my
view on the question of student
voting. I attempted to make it
clear -that. I felt the statute, al-
'though constitutional, was not
particularly wise. I feel the Legis-.
lature should change the statute
so that students can vote -where
they go to school. There is a bill

pending in the Legislature spon-
sored by Senator Levin to make it
much easier for students to vote
where they go to school. Senator
Levin is running for Governor this
year and if students feel that the
statute should be amended they
should write -to the Senator and
make their views known.
-Edward B. Goldman
Assistant City Attorney
June 25

Jtc

PETS AND SUPPLIES

KITTENS and CATS. Cute, trained
FREE, black, grey, or mixed-up. a
variety of sizes and shapes. Call 665-
4830. TD44

I
l
7

LAW OR GRAD. student to share 2
bdrm/ furn, apt. this fall w'2nd yr.
law student.'Veteran perferred, tree
psrking. 769-7570. 42Ytc
2 UPPERCLASSMEN needed to fill big
house, Aug. 1. $70-'mo., man plus
utilities. 668-8667. 13Y44
FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted to share
apt. in Fall, prefer grad-professionals.
Reply Box 55, Daily. 10Y43
WOMAN GRAD WANTED TO SHARE
2-man, 2-bdrm. apt. in house close
to campus. Call Sara, 769-1325. 11Y44

2 FREE CATS
Housebroken-Lovable
665-2565 after 5.

TD44 }

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