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July 11, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-11
Note:
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Page Six

0

I V I I 4

9

4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Vf.

Senate repeals Gulf of Tonkin
resolution for second time

WASHINGTON (P) - The Sen-f
ate of the United States, no
stranger to rhetoric or to repeti-
tion, outdid itself yesterday, de-
bating at length and then repeal-
ing a resolution it repealed less1
than a month ago.a
"I have been in the Senate for
16 years and I thought I had seen1
pretty much everything," com-
mented Republican Gordon Allott,
of Colorado. "But this is truly re-
markable."
"It's another f o r m of yoga,"
said Republican Leader Hugh
Scott of Pennsylvania.
"The present resolution is not
redundant," countered Sen. J. W.
Fulbright (D-Ark.) who is chair-
man of the Foreign Relations
Committee and was behind it all.
The object of Republican deri-
sion and Fulbright's earnestness
was a resolution to repeal t h e
1964 Tonkin Gulf resolution which
former President Lyndon B. John-
son used as legal authority to send
U.S. combat forces into the Viet-
nam war.
The resolution w a s approved
and sent to the House on a 57-5
vote after about two hours of de-
bate that fluctuated between out-
right spoofing and high-minded
but complex constitutional argu-
ment.
The Senate already had voted
to repeal the Tonkin resolution,
approving an amendment to that
effect 81 to 10 on June 24. That
amendment to a military sales
bill, however, ruffled the feathers
of Senate doves, notably Ful-
bright.
For one thing, it was a parlia-
mentary ploy designed to give the

administration credit for t h e Dole: I might observe that w e
Tonkin repeal. could talk until the cows come
For another, it was a somewhat homeie - they were mentioned in
unusual procedure. the last debate - but it probably
Senate is not necessary that we have ox-
~tOne of t he strongest Snt tended debate on this matter.
traditions - although it is not atFub a oth e-s
formal rule -- is that senators do Fulbright: Talk to the cowsc
not call up proposals sponsored Dole: Until the cows come
by others to be voted on prema- home.
turely, especially when they would Fulbright: I have no intention
do so for purposes quite different of talking to the cows until the,
from those of the original spon- cows come home, whenever 1hat
sor," Fulbright told the Senate. may be.
Fulbright s a i d the earlier Scott: Or until t h e chickens'
amendment, sponsored by Sen. come home to roost.I
Robert J. Dole (R-Kan.), when
coupled with other amendments
to the military sales bill, repre-
sented a surrender to the White:
House.
The resolution before the Sen-
ate, said Fulbright, "represents,
the only means through which we
can repeal the unfortunate Ton-
kin resolution in such a way as to
assert rather than resign from the M-M-m-m-m, yummie!
constitutional authority of Con- A giant hamburger of /lb. U.S.
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That was the high side of the
debate that began with this ex-
change between Dole, Scott and
Fulbright:
Scott: Last night I suggested a
limitation of debate on this reso-
lution of 10 minutes, five min-
utes to a side. It has been often
debated before. I think we ought
to be m o r e generous, perhaps,
than that and I wonder whether
the distinguished senator f r o m
Arkansas would agree to 20 min-
utes, 10 minutes to a side?
Fulbright: I do not believe I
am disposed to make an agree-
ment at this time.

Govt. pure beef topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onions,
pickles and ketchup .
West of Arborland

rA FRANK McCARTHY-
FRANKLIN I.SCHAFFNER
PRODUCTION

1

M

MATINEES
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AIL

EVES.
6:30-9:05

1:V,-1 4

*T 7ctdnm r 0 Cooli
8TH HAPPY WEEK

The 8th Wonder of the Motion Picture World!
We cannot hold it forever.

SEE IT NOW!

SEE IT TODAY!

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"**** HIGHEST RATING!"
-Wanda Hale, N YDoiy News
.ROSSHUNTER suouc+ N
AIRPORTR
BURT LANCASTER - DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG -eJACQUEUNE BISSET
GEORGE KENNEDY'- HELEN HAYES
VAN NEFUN -MAUREEN STAPLETON
A UNIVERSAL PICIM10-TECHNICOLOR' Produced in 70MM TODD A'
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"TNE FI~IWIINS'

\ R
ASFYARRTOS a
TH E TIM ESNATIONALENERALPCTURESPresents
(Reprinted in its entirety from N.Y. Times,
Thursday, May 28, 1970)
Screen: Grasshopper' a Rare Truth
queline Bisset) descends from
Work by Jerry Paris Canada upon a Los Angeles boy- Jacqueline Bisset Stars
friend, splits when the future in Girl's Life Story
at Local Theaters (a bank job and many sound in-
vestments) seem too dull, and
heads for Las Vegas. She dances I don't think the film intends
By ROGER GREENSPUN in a club anid, after a few ad- al program of maturation
ventures; marries a black form- rohhardtimes, butChtris-
If I were to construct a vehi- er football star <Jim Brown tine at the end suggests a lovely
cle for the romantic sensibility surely the most type-cast actor and reckless intensity that Chris-
n the movies, I should avoid all in the movies), demeans herself tine at the beginning could
the lush presences of, say. "A advancing his career, and learns scarcely have imagined.
Man and a Woman," or the mis- she doesn't like domesticity. As a movie, "The Grasshopper"
ty distances of, say, "Elvira Ma- When her husband dies'(mur- lives in its visual rhythms, and
digan," and choose instead the I am not sure that the photo-
bright colors and clear perspec- ldeservedbhoods revengher de- grapher (Sam Leavitt) and the
tives of Jerry Paris's "The Grass- cline begins in earnest. She goes film editor (Aaron Stell) should-
hopper," a film of ordinary am- from call-girl to kept woman n't share major credit with the
btiesstunni med but some- (for Joseph Cotten), to $50 director. Nothing else really
tims tunin suces.whore, to ultimate despair in equals the handsome montage of
"The Grasshopper," which op- which, with the help of a flying Las Vegas shows that appears
ene estray teighborhood fool, she sky-writes an appropri- early on, but the film repeatedly
theatres, does not simply invoke, ate mesage (which I cannot re- transcends its own vulgarity, al-tors(there
moods. And although it strikes America applauds and the silent are no performances to speak of
little new ground and discovers majority faints dead in its ept for Missveet) tand
few nw cominatins, i acimprovesks.upon the conventions
fewnewcombinations, it chiv- tracks that keep it moving,
esa fairly rare kind of intelli-
gnce and truth in the clarity As usual among us, failure is 0
and fluidity of its style. more instructive, more compli- Jacqueline Bisset looks rather
cated, and more attractive than like a more voluptuous Julie
success. Committed to the mor- Christie, and her role in "The
ality of each moment, Christine Grasshopper" probably owes a
is never wise bus also she is ne- little to the heroines of "Darl-
The ad copy says it is "the ver wrong, and her very aim- ing" and "Petulia." But she
story of a beautiful girl's life- lessness (like the many non seems more durable and forth-
time between the ages of 19 and sequiturs of the plot) has a kind right, less secretive and sensi-.
22," and though I wouldn't have of shapeliness to it that justi- tive than Julie Christie, and bet-
put it quite that way, the ad fies imprudence and even in- ter adapted to suggest, without
copy does not lie. Christine (Jac- decision on esthetic grounds: pathos, tough luck that is more
0 1970 by The New York Times Company 0 Reprinte d by Permission. than misfortune and less than
When her movie is over, she
NATIONAL Starring: has gotten somewhere; she really
GENERAL has won the knowledge for
PICTURES JACQUELINE BISSET which she has lost innocence.
Presents
JIM BROWN "THE GRASSHOPPER"
JOSEH COTONEndS Tuesday
JOSEPH COTTON WED.--"Female Animal"
SNEAK PREVIEW TONIGHT
A complete screening of a new feature at 7:20 tonight.
Judith Crist says of this preview feature:
"it is a privilege to see a film like this. One Grasshopper - 5:35
is overwhelmed. A master storyteller, a
superb screen writer, an inspired director, Sneak -7:2
pctrfessof a qualit mong Grasshopper--9:00,1045

Students in
Chile strike,
tension high
SANTIAGO, Chile (/P)-Tension mount-
ed in Chile yesterday as, university stu-
dents staged a nationwide strike and a
coalition of six left-wing parties de-
manded that President Eduardo Frei dis-
miss two of his national security chiefs.
Frei's own Christian Democratic party
asked for "substantial changes in the
government's domestic policies," although
Frei has little-more than two months left
in power.
Chileans elect a new president .Sept. 4.
Violence has been on the rise in the
past three months, and three students
have been killed in clashes between dem-
onstrators and police in the past two
weeks.
The latest fatality occurred Wednesday
night during a violent demonstration by
left-wing students in the capital city of
Santiago. Miguel Aguileras, a 17-year
old high school student was fatally shot
during the demonstration.
President Frei ordered an investiga-
tion of the shooting, but expressed con-
fidence in his national security chiefs-
Interior Minister Patricio Rojas and
Chief of Chilean Police General Vicente
Huerta-and said he would not accept
any resignations.
The calls for dismissal of the policy
chiefs were led by Socialist party presi-
dential candidate Salvador Allende, 62.
Iceland'
mourns f or
dead leader
REYKJAVIK, Iceland (/P)-Police sifted
through the ruins of a wooden cottage
yesterday seeking the cause of fire and
explosion which killed Iceland's prime
minister, Bjarni Benediktsson, his wife
and a grandson during the night.
Flags were flown at half staff through-
out Iceland in mourning for the 62-year-
old government chief who had wielded
a powerful influence on the politics of
this northern island nation. Johnson Has-
stein, minister of Justice and Industry,
took over as acting prime minister.
A priest who lived nearby saw the flam-
es coming from the cottage Thursday
night in Tingvellir, 40 miles from Reyk-
javik, and turned in the alarm.
A party of Danish tourists also saw
the fire and hastened to the scene, but
by the time they reached the house, it
was an inferno. A few minutes later, an
explosion lifted off the roof.
When a fire brigade arrived from Reyk-
javik an hour later, they found only ruins
and the charred remains of the prime
minister, his 50-year-old wife, Sigridur,
and grandson, Benedikt.
Guilty on
one count
Martin Sweig, left, suspended ad-
ministrative assistant to House
Speaker John McCormack, is ac-

companied by his lawyer Paul T.
Smith as they leave Federal Court
in New York Thursday night. A
jury had just found him guilty
on one count of perjury and ac-
quited him on five other perjury
counts and one conspiracy count
in his influence-peddling trial.

Shouts,

S 4
ag(
det
LANE
ting 18
cinct d
tional .
among
law yes
Milliken
The t
'provid
ful acce
"I ha
ing pr:
they b
"and ti
while s
"It p+
have sig
of prog
ties in
such pa
imports
ties," h
The ]
to 18-y
House
ovation
gallerie

at

World

Youth Asse:

-Associated Press
'Timely' idea
Dr. Hale Dougherty of Anaheim, Calif., is credited with originating the Spiro
Agnew wristwatch. He, his wife and 10 children work around the clock to fill
orders. The watches are made in Switzerland and Dougherty distributes them.

boos,

turmoil

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (A) - At a
stormy session, the World Youth Assem-
bly yesterday rejected leftist demands for
expulsion of representatives from South
Vietnam, South Korea and Nationalist
China.
The assembly approved the recom-
mendation of its 18-member steering
committee that no one should be expelled
and that all participants already regist-
ered should be accepted. Some leftists
sought also expulsion of Greece and
Spain.
Similarly the assembly endorsed the
committee's proposal to ,make new bids
asking Communist China, North Viet-
nam, North Korea and the Provisional
Revolutionary Government of South Viet-
nam to send representatives. They have
rejected previous invitations.
Lars Thalen, 26, of Stockholm, a vet-
eran of socialist youth organizations at
home, presided over the assembly session
as chairman of its steering committee. He
said the committee had come up with its
recommendations endorsed by a major-
ity after a marathon nine-hour meeting
that ended at 5 a.m.
When the assembly declined to accept
the recommendations of the steering com-
miteee as a whole he conducted votes on
'separate items by voice, the raising of
hands or calling on delegates to stand.
The Soviet delegation and its sup-
porters won out in their demands that
meetings of the assembly's four major

commissions be public and not behind
closed doors.
They deal with world peace and secur-
ity, development, education and the en-
vironment.
The assembly of about 600 delegates
ended up endorsing in main the recom-
mendations of its steering committee.
Thalen's deft handling was credited with
gaining that objective.
Wearing a white open-neck shirt in
keeping with the informal dress of most
male participants, Thalen spoke out in
exasperation when whistles and boos
greeted some speakers.
"I think this is fantastic," he declared.

"The World
at the Unite
never done.
On occasi
rostrum eve.
out of order
Amid the
delegate fro
the assembl
the gatherin
the decision
not to reco
fael Benitez
He charged
were given
the assembl

I

RAM sets fund-r d nea a n

- By BILL ALTERMAN
The Black Action Movement (BAM
will sponsor a fund-raising dance Friday,
July 17, at Wayne State University.
The dance, to be held at the New Stu-
dent Center Ballroom on the WSU cam-
pus, is being organized by the BAM In-
ner City Support Committee (ICSC).
Proceeds from the dance will help pay
off debts incurred during the two week
BAM class strike last spring-.
Admission to the dance is by a dona-
tion of.$1.50.

In additi
ICSC has n
munity grow
aging black
the Universi
Earlier in
attended a r
cuss the 0:
On hand we
the Univers
the Highe
Committee
Project 350
In the fa
tablish club
schools. To
Clubs, they
tion centers
tending the
By meeti
clubs, ICSC
of rapport
and high scl
The clubs
a permanen
The purpc
350 and 250
Michigan Bc
associated v
and include
Basically, ti
dents who
under WSU
aim is to in
atmosphere
those whose
lege cutoff :
HEOC is
not concern
any specific
to motivate
education.:

THE MIRISCH PRODUCTION COMPANY Presents
CHARLITON HESTON
I A WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION THE HAWAIIANS"
cosarrng Alsostarrg
6ERALDINE CHAPUN, JOHN PHILLIP LAW, MAKO, TINA CHEN
as NYUK ISIN
ALEC McCOWEN as- maH E Music- HENRY MANCINI Screenplay ti JAMES R.WEBB
Based onthe NoltavwwAir by JAMES A.MICHENER Produced by WALTER MIRISCH Directed by TOM GRIES
PANAVISION┬░ COLOR by Deluxe' FGP] Unied Aphiss

HELD
OVER! TE

SHOWS
AT :
1:15-3:45
6:20 & 9.00 P.M.

-Associated Press

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