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July 09, 1970 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-09
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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 9, 1970

Thursday, July 9, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

Costs
By ROB BIER
Dail} Nvws, Afnalysis
The nation's economic woes
have reached the University,
possibly delaying construction of
400 apartments for married stu-
deits.
Because of the currently high
iterest rates in the bond mar-
ket, the University - to fund
the housing project - may be
forced to charge substantially
higher rent for Northwood V
than for other N o r t h w ood
apartments. And this financial
dilemma exists despite recent
approval of a federal subsidy
for the project,

threaten

married

ho

Because the state does not
appropriate any money for the
construction of University hous-
ing, nearly all of it must be fi-
nanced by the sale of bonds to
private investors. Interest is
paid to the investors at a fixed
rate for the life of the bonds.
When Northwood V was orig-
inally planned, it was to be a
400-unit apartment complex.
But when the housing office ap-
plied to the Department of
Housing a n d Urban Develop-
ment (HUD) for a grant, to
cover the difference between the
three per cent interest rate for
a federal loan, if it were avail-

SPECIAL
Blood, Sweat,& Tears
Album No. 3
only $3.50
tax included
HI-Fl BUYS
618 S. Main St. Ann Arbor

able, and the current eight per
cent interest for bonds, they
were informed that only a lim-
ited amount of money would be
given for any one project.
The housing office subse-
quently split the project in two.
and although they have receiv-
ed more money from HUD. the
subsidy still covers only t w o
per cent of the eight per cent
interest rate.
Higher rents could produce
the funds needed to pay the to-
tal interest on the bonds. But
the question still to be answered
is whether students would be,
willing to pay higher rates for
apartments which would be es-
sentially identical to the exist-
ing Northwood IV.
A meeting of the Student'Ad-
visory Committee on Housing
(SACH) is scheduled for 1 p.m.
today on the third floor of the
Student Activities Bldg. to ex-
plore the question.
Don Blevins, president of the
Northwood/Terrace Association,
says he is unhappy with the
prospect of higher rates for the
new complex, especially because
this comes on the heels of the
rent increase recently approved
by the Regents to pay for the
cost of educating children of
Northwood tenants.
"I think the only thing to do
is wait and hope the economy
improves in the next few years,"
Blevins says.
But waiting h a s its draw-
backs as well. SACH chairman
Prof. Peter Ostafin, asks, "Do
you wait a while for the market
rates to drop? And if you do,
will the rising costs of ^on-
struction balance out any re-
duction in rates?"
One way or another, the hous-

ing office wants to make a de-
cision fairly soon. If the choice
is to go ahead, they would like
to get utilities put in at the 35-
acre site on Glacier Way before
fall, with full occupancy by fall
1972. And if the decision is to
wait, then the housing office
would like to release some of the
project money for other under-
takings in the interim.
"If we do build it now, rents
could be as mu c h as $42 a
month higher than at North-
wood IV," Salowitz says. Added
to current rent rates, that would
mean about $192 a month for a
two-bedroom apartment with
utilities and,$214 a month for a
three-bedroom unit with utili-
ties.
"If someone c a n afford Io
live in Northwoods V at those

using
rates, they can afford to go out
into the private market," Blev-
ins says. "Then, the University
isn't filling its commitment for
low-cost married student hous-
ing."
However, two factors are not
likely to change in the near fu-
ture, despite the vagaries of the
nation's economy - the rising
demand for housing a n d the
shortage of it in Ann Arbor.
"We've already got 600 appli-
cations for married student
housing, even though we've tried
to discourage them," Salowitz
says. "We'll only be able to fill
a few hundred."
Ostafin agrees and adds. "If
we delay now, the situation may
be so bad in a few years that
we'll be sorry we didn't build."

Rogers claims war

DIAL 8-6416
ANOTHER OF
DOUBLE ENCORE
PROGRAM-.. .
CLOSELY
WATCHED
TRAINS'
Directed by JIM Menzel " A Carlo P'ont! presentation.
Distributed by MK Sigma fi A tilmways Company.
AND
"TANTALIZING AND
HYPNOTIC! "
- Jdaih Crijt. N V World J.wu Trbw .
eLJ6-AE-Sa
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I

down in S.

Congress to hear
anti-bombing law

Vietnam

SAIGON (R') - Willia
Rogers surprised some me
of his own staff here this
when he said: "In one sen
war is not being conducted
per cent of South Vietna
The secretary of state ex
ed this view at an impri
news conference in Phu T
peaceful hamlet in the M
Delta, during a tour Mc
He said it again the nex
with some elaboration, wh
left Vietnam.
"It is very encouraging t
that about 90 per cent c
country is secure, and that
tions have been held in vi

SHOP JACOBSON'S MON. 'TIL 9:00 P.M.

TUES. THRU FRI. 9:30 A.M.-5:30 P.M,

CLOSED SATURDAYS THRU AUGUST 8

l

Im P. and hamlets in about 90 per cent
mbers of the country and that in one
week sense of the word I suppose we
se the could say in that area of the
I in 90 country the war is not being
mn." -waged" he said.
press- "I read from time to time
omptu that the war has been enlarged,
'am, a but actually when you anal-
ekong yze it, the war has been re-
)nday. duc d."
t day, Casualties have dropped, few-
ien he er engagements have been
fought, and the war is "at con-
o find siderably less intensity than a
)f the year ago," he added.
t elec- Military statistics back up
illages this last statement, but with a
- million and a half allied troops
operating from installations in
9ll 44 provinces it is question-
able that the war is being waged
in only a tenth of the nation.
A spokesman for the U.S.
Command refused comment ex-
cept to say the command "has
nothing to add to the secre-
tary's remarks."
One informed Army officer,
saying he had no idea how
Rogers could reach his conclu-
sion, observed: "Maybe he was
figuring that troops aren't ac-
tually standing on more than
10 per cent of the ground at any
#one time."
SMore probably, the secretary
was basing his statement on
Hamlet Evaluation S y s t e m
HES) reportsthat purport to
show the degree of government
control in all the 10.522 hamlets.
The complex computerized rat-
ing system last month showed
that 89.7 per cent of the 17.8
million'people were living under
relative government control in
A. B, or C hamlets. The rest -
in D, E or VC hamlets - were
said to be living in contested
areas or under Viet Cong con-
trol.
Officials and advisers who
work with the HES reports on
a local level say they indicate
where efforts must be concen-
trated, but few rely on them to
show were people are safe.
"All old HES was ever des-
ignated to do was to show where
the wind was blowing," said one
official in the pacification pro-
gram. "But you know we Amer-
icans are mesmerized by fig-
ures, and the HES percentages
are so damn quotable."
lIEE
e i

WASHINGTON oP) - Several
months after a surge of explos-
ions and bomb threats touched
off calls for new federal anti-
terrorist ,1a w s, congressional
committees are arranging hear-
ings on proposed legislation.
Among proposals set for re-
view by a House panel n e x t
week is legislation offered last
March by President Nixon, who
said: "The archaic and criminal
elements who perpetrate such
acts deserve no more patience
or indulgence.".
Nixon's legislation is certain
to cause controversy because it
provides t h e death penalty
when a terrorist act kills some-
one. However, 'some backers say
privately they might be willing
to scrap the capital punishment
provision if it endangers an
otherwise acceptable bill.
But they say long prison
terms for convicted bombers
are essential elements in an ef-
The place to meet
INTERESTING people!
BACH CLUB
presents
ROBERT BOURY
conducting a program on
ELECTRONIC MUSIC
featuring works of T. Kincaid,
R. Boury & K. Carpenter and
a simultaneous
LIGHT SHOW
Thurs., July 9-8 P.M.
CANTERBURY HOUSE-
330 Maynard
Refreshments & FUN afterwards.
Everybody welcome! (No musi-
cal knowledge needed.) If you
need further info call 663-2827
or 769-2003.

fective legal approach to the
problem.
While a House judiciary sub-
committee prepares for hearings
starting July 15 on suggestions
for control of interstate traf-
ficking in explosives, a Senate
'investigating subcommittee is
reported planning an inquiry
later this month into "the gen-
eral problem of bombings and
terrorism."
The Senate panel headed by
John L. McClellan (D-Ark.) in-
tends to "outline the problem
and take legislative recoxmmen-
dations from a number of peo-
ple -- and then go forward from
there," a source said.
McClellan is expected to an-
nounce the dates for the inves-
tigation soon.
A mo n g the measures to be
studied by the House subcom-
mittee is one entered by Rep.
Emanuel Celler {D-NY) aimed
atmhelping law enforcement of-
ficials fight crime while avoid-
ing unnecessary federal restric-
tions on the use of explosives
for lawful purposes.
Explosives - control measures
flowed into Congress shortly af-
ter a series of bombing inci-
dents and bomb threats earlier
this year. But t h e r e was no
movement on t h e bills until
now.
Sen. Thomas J. Dodd (D-
Conn.) had wanted hearings in
May on a bill he introduced.
But his Senate juvenile de-
quency subcommittee post-
poned action after he suffered
I a heart attack.
Most congressmen asked about
the delaybytvarious other com-
mittees contend more pressing
problems and issues have con-
sumed the time of the major
panels given responsibility for
hearing testimony on explos-
ives control.
The proposals range from
Dodd's approach of revising the
1968 gun control law, to Rep.
Charles Vanik's (D-Ohio) meas-
ure to tax the transfer of blast-
ing material and outlaw posses-
sion of untaxed explosives.

Try Daily Classifieds

ABORTION AND
ABORTION LAW REFORM
a panel discussion with:.
Denis Cavanagh, M.D.
Chrm., Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics
St. Louis University School of Medicine
Gerald Flannery, S.T.L.
Rector, St. Mary's Student Chapel
Peter Forsythe, L.L.B.
Forsythe, Campbell and Vandenbura, Attys. at Law

WASHINGTON (P) - House
rules allow congressmen to vote
on issues like troops in Cam-
bodia and the 18-year-old fran-
chise without recording their in-
dividual positions - but 57
members launched a drive yes-
terday to end such secrecy.
The group, not only biparti-
san but representing every

III

IndoChina j
Rep. William R. Anderson (D-Tenr
after reporting to the House Indoc
cutting off supplies into Haiphong
of U.S. withdrawal from the war.
BIPARTISAN EFFO
House dr T
to en sec

I

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I::

4-
*

~~
6 .
s imported Italian
hand-embroidered
sweaters of fully
lined white wool
mohair for cool
days and summer's
air-conditioned places.
White with multi-pastels.
Sizes SML. $30.
SPORTSWEAR-
Second floor of fashion
JaobaIS

Sunday, July 12
Newman Center Basement

8 p.m.
ALL ARE INVITED
TO ATTEND

NOW FAM NGCTHETRE ORPRATIN IM Thuar. 8:15 only
NOWANATILCOMPANY Fri. 6:30, 10:00
Sat. 1:30, 5:30,
SHOWING FOH VILLa E .:30
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300 8:15
a wadleigh-maurice, ltd. production
technicolor® from warner bros.
PASS LIST SUSPENDED

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F

BREAK TIHE HABITI
Don't let the same routine get you
down at lunch time. The Michigan
Union buffet served daily from 11:45
to 1 :00 is the place. The atmosphere
is relaxed, the menu is different, and
the price is right. Don't wait, break
the habit and try the Michigan Union
buffet.
Private rooms available by reservation
CALL 764-7535

I

it

Heavy Duty Steering
and Suspension Ports
s BALL. JOINTS
" IDLER ARMS
* TIE ROD ENDS

HELP WANTED: PEACE CANDIDATES
are running for Congress in two nearby
"swing" districts trying. to unseat conserva-
tive Republicans. They must first win the
Aug. 4 primary against old-line Democratic
opposition. These are the big Congressional
races in Michigan because they can be won.
18th dist. (Birmingham etc.) Mrs. Annetta Miller
HQ 1-645-9454r
19th dist. (Livonia etc.) Ronald Hecker
HQ 1-476-4063
NEEDED NOW: Campaign coordinators.
No experience necessary if you can work hard, like
talking to people, think fast - and - can spore Y2
to full time until Aug. 4. If you have less time or any
other questions, call Marc Ross, Ann Arbor New
Democratic Coalition, oft. 764-4459, eve. (till 11)
665-3166.

1

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3
a
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LIBERTY AT MAYNARD

2333 JACKSON AVE
Phone 769-5914

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