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July 09, 1970 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-09

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9

£ S 4_f

4

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 9, 1970

Tiger
3-2w
By The Associated Press
Pinch-hitter Gates B r o w n
boomed a long sacrifice fly in
the bottom of the ninth to cli-
max a weird rally and give the
Detroit Tigers a 3-2 victory over
Boston last night.
With one man out and the*
game tied, 2-2, Norm Cash and
Don Wert drew walks. With Jim
Price batting, Red Sox reliever
Vincente Romo unloaded a wild
pitch, allowing Cash to take
third. The Tigers then pulled
Price in favor of Dalton Jones,
who was given an intentional
pass.
Tiger manager May Smith
then inserted Elliott Maddox to
run for Cash, and Brown, bat-
ting for Ken Szotkewiecz, came
through with a long fly and.
Maddox scooted home with the
winning tally.
The Red Sox had tied the
game in the top of the ninth,
getting a single tally on Rico
Petrocelli's double and Billy
Conigliaro's single.
Boston drew first blood in the
fourth, as Carl Yastrzemski sin-
gled, stole second and raced
home on Tony Conigliaro's
single.
The Tigers overcame this def-
icit in the late innings, as Willie

ral in

for

, C14

Sfrl~igan

:4.3

rn

-Associated Press
Curses - foiled again
Ex-heavyweight champ Muhammed Clay (or is it Cassius Ali?)
helps a little girl onto a plane as he leaves Charleston, S.C. The
champ was scheduled to fight an exhibition for charity, but Clay
told the promotors he would prefer they cancel the fight rather
than pay too much for a site. The matches were to be staged in a
Charleston arena, but City Council denied the permit.

RAIN HALTS PLAY

Horton hit his 16th homer of
the season to tie the game in
the seventh, and Szotkewiecz
belted his third in the eighth.
Mickey Lolich, 7-10, snapped
a personal five-game losing
streak that saw him go without
a win in June by, pitching a
complete game.
In other American League
games, Don Buford's bases-load-
ed single capped a three-run
ninth-inning rally that gave
Baltimore a 9-8 victory over the
Yankees in a wild and wooly
affair.
Buddy Bradford belted a
grand slam homer in the eighth
inning to give Cleveland a 6-5
comeback triumph over the
Senators, and Chicago's Bobby
Knoop raced home on an error
by pitcher Al Downing to start
a two-run rally that lifted. the
sagging White Sox to a 2-1 vic-
tory over the Brewers.
In National League action,
San Francisco must h a v e
thought they were at a carnival
instead of a baseball game in
Atlanta. Giant batters got on
a merry-go-around in the fifth
inning, and merrily circled the
bases until eleven runs had
crossed the plate en route to
13-0 slaughter.
Recently recalled Jim Ray
Hart tied a major league record
by driving home six runs in the
fifth with a three-run homer
and a bases-loaded triple.
McLain fined
for zealous
fungo hitting
DETROIT (P) - Detroit's
Denny McLain is up to his old
tricks again, but on a much
smaller scale. The Tiger man-
agement confirmed yesterday
that McLain has b e e n fined
$2.50 for each ball he hit into
the left-field stands during
warm-up for outfielders July 2.
Tiger General Manager Jim
Campbell said, "It's notsa fine,
we're just asking Denny to pay
for t he balls he deliberately
knocked into the stands." Mc-
Lain has been assessed small
amounts in the past for the
same stunt.
When asked about the inci-
dent, McLain said, "No com-
ment. What am I supposed to
be, Peck's bad boy or some-
thing?"

nith
In °other NL games, the per-
sistent New York Mets gained a
game on second place Pitts-
6urgh, as they rode a three-run
homer by Ken Singleton to a
7-5 win over St. Louis. The
Pirates dropped a 2-0 decision
to Philadelphia on Deron John-
son's two-run homer in the
ninth.
Montreal salvagedl some pride
by coming back to beat Chicago
5-4 In the nightcap after the
Cubs had won the opener, 5-1.
Maury Will stroked a two-run
double to cap a five-run ninth
that gave Los Angeles a 6-5
victory over Houston, and Cin-
cinnati lost to San Diego, 3-1.
All-'Star
pitre
selected
By The Associated Press
Managers Earl Weaver of
Baltimore and Gil Hodges of
New York announced their
pitching staffs f o r Tuesday's
All-Star game in Cincinnati yes-
terday.
The American League hurlers
are headed by three members of
Weaver's own Orioles - lefties
Mike Cuellar, co-winner of the
Cy Young award in 1969, Dave
McNally, and righthander Jim
Palmer.
Hodges named only one Met,
Tom Seaver. The National Lea-
gue st a ff is headed by two
members of Cincinnati's reju-
venated mound corps - Jim
Merritt, who leads the majors
with 14 victories, a n d rookie
phenom Wayne Simpson, who
has amassed an incredible 13-1
record.
Weaver also named Yankees
Fritz Peterson and Mel Stottle-
myre, Angel no-hit artist Clyde
Wright, Oakland ace Jim Hunt-
er, Minnesota's Jim Perry, and
Cleveland's fire-balling S a m
McDowell.
Hodges named two reliefers to
his squad, the Phillies Joe
Hoerner and Atlanta's ageless
knuckleballer, Hoyt Wilhelm.
Also named to t he NL staff
were St. Louis workhorse Bob
Gibson, who is hitting .400, the
Dodgers' Claude Osteen, and
Gaylord Perry of San Francisco.

F L

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SKS

Vol. LXXX, No. 41 -s Ann Arbor, Michigan-Thursday, July 9, 1970 Ten Cent

TUITIO

HIKE

THIS

St.

0

I

A ndre ws

ripped

by red-hot

ST ANDREWS, Scotland ()
- A dozen of the world's great-
est golfers savaged the Old
Course of St. Andrews in the
first round of the 1970 British
Open championship yesterday,
but only a lightning rain storm
stopped defending titlist Tony
Jacklin from making golf his-
tory.
In balmy weather, the early
starters butchered the par-72
course, including a record-
breaking 65 by Neil Coles of
England, a 66 by England's
Tommy Horton, and others
close behind.
Late in the day, Jacklin, hold-
er of b o t h British and U.S.
crowns, shattered the front nine
with an incredible 29 shots,
seven under par.
As he birdied the 10th to go
eight under par, a thunderstorm
came in off St. Andrews Bay.
After the 13th hole, Jacklin
was still eight under and head-
ed for a score that would be ar-
gued about for generations but
play had to be abandoned.
With about 22 stars still on
the course, The Royal and An-
cient Golf Club decided for the
first time in its history to com-

plete the rounds Thursda
decision to mark the bal.
ed Jacklin, Lee Trevino
others f r o m starting
scratch.
At the end of the first
play in the $100,000 title
ney, the situation was th
Coles, at 65, was cle
front.
Horton was breathing
his neck at 66.
On 67 were four unex]
challengers, youngsters.
Charles Richardson of En
Harold Hennings of Sou
rica, Maurice Bembridge o
land and Florentino Mol
Argentina.
On 68 were five-timeI
Open Champion PeterI
son of Australia, Arnold
er, Jack Nicklaus and
Sanders from the U.S.c
and Brian Huggett, the
Cupper from Wales.
At three under par 69
G a y Brewer, of Dallas
U.S. amateur champion
Melnyk of Brunswick, Ga
British amateur king M
Bonallack.
F o u r shot 70's, in
Ohians Tom Weiskopfo

go ifers
y. The lumbus and Georg Bellino.
Ls sav- Youngstown.
a n d Nine were tied at 71, one un-
from der par, and another 14 among
the field of 134 were on even
t day's par 72 for the 6,951-yard Old
tour- Course thatehas resisted domi-
is: nation for centuries.
rly in The weather was responsible
down for the incredible scoring until
the storm.
:pected Jacklin said after the thun-
J o h n derstorm had stopped play:
ngland, "That was the best nine I've
th Af- ever played. Remember that 29,
of Eng- I know I'll remember it.
ina of "Play has been stopped with
my ball under a bush. I'll have
British to consider that business before
Thom- I decide how to play.
Palm- "It's an interesting thought
Doug to go to bed with tonight."
circuit,
Ryder
9 were
Tex.,
Steve
a., and
viichael3
eluding
of Co- k.

Presider
day no n
recommer
meet a we
"We are
and recon
what we]h
statement
television
There 1h
an increa
dition to
April. As
hinted at
and fee i
tentatively
based upo
receive in
posed by t;
"The le
fact, $2.2'
budget. W
situation,'
try very
crease.
Fleming
earlier sta
telegram f
House hi
sub-com ;
new tuitici
Rep. G
troit), a cf
in the Up
"Caution
tuition oi
2J enroll
Universit3
pense.
" Your$
lion highi
quate for
ties and q
fiscal situ
to pay mo
prove pr
credit hot
The pro
is one in:
cation bil
It require
tuition lev
and face
if any tul
after that

-Associated Press

Indians meet with President

Indians control of programs

WASHINGTON- (R) - Deploring the educational institutions their children
plight of American Indians, President attend.
Nixon told Congress yesterday, "The Nixon also proposed a significant in-
time has come to break decisively with crease in federal aid to economic develop-
the past" and welcome Indians to assume ment-industrial, commercial and re-
creational-affecting Indian lands which
greater control of federal programs that the nation as a whole holds in trustee-
affect them. ship.

that public monies will be more effec-
tively expended if the people who are
most affected by these programs are re-
sponsible for operating them."
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, speak-
ing as chairman of the National Coun-
cil on Indian Opportunity, described
Nixon's proposals to newsmen as far-
reaching and a "distinct departure" from
pgst policies.

5LW#"m''":..:. E'..-:-s....".::mm..mmm ... . .

I

Major League Standings

. - ....
Si?

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Baltimore
Detroit
New York
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
xMinnesotla
xraifornia
xOakland
xKansas City
Milwaukee
Chicago

East
W L
52 30
44 36
44 37
41 39
37 44
37 47
west
51 26
48 33
45 37
30 50
30 54
29 55

Pct.
.636
.550
.544
.513
.456
.446
.662
.593
.549
.375
.354
.343

GB
7
7%
10
14
16

New York
Pittsburgh
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal

East
w
46
46
41
39
35
34
West

L
36
39
41
43
47
50

Pet.
.561
.542
.500
.476
.426
.405

GB
1Y
5
7
11
13
18
19
25%
2714

If Congress agrees, and legislation will
be needed in some cases, more than $400
million a year in federal spending will be
thrown open to control by Indians rather
than by government bureaucrats.
In a special message, Nixon said: "The
first Americans -the Indians -are the
most deprived and most isolated minority
group in our nation. On virtually every
scale of measure-employment, income,
education, health-the condition of the
Indian people ranks at the bottom."
In the wake of Nixon's message, the
question remained whether the chief
executive would turn next to messages
on the plight of other minorities, notably
the blacks.
The President said it is time "for a new
era in which the Indian future is deter-
mined by Indian acts and Indian deci-
sions.
He asked Congress for legislation that
would permit Indians to assume direct
administration and control of most fed-
eral programs affecting their local com-
munities -- power that would be removed
from federal employes such as those staf-
fing the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the
Interior Department.
Nixon specifically sought authorization
to permit Indian communities to set up
' their own school boards and operate the

"We have concluded," he said, "that
the Indians will get better programs and

5
8
22?
24i
25

x--late game not inc.
Yesterday's Results
Detroit 3, Boston 2
Baltimore 9, New York 8
Cleveland 6, Washington 5
Chicago 2, Milwaukee 1
Kansas City at California, inc.
Minnesota at Oakland, inc.
Today's Games
Boston at Detroit
Minnesota at California
Washington at Cleveland
New York at Baltimore

Cincinnati 59 23 .71
Los Angeles 50 32 .611
Atlanta 41 40 .50
San Francisco 39 42 .48
Houston 34 50 .40
San Diego 33 53 .38
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 5, Montreal 1, 1st
Montreal 5, Chicago 4, 2nd
Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 0
New York 7, St. Louis 5
Los Angeles 6, Houston 5
San Diego 3, Cixcinnati 1
San Francisco 13, Atlanta 0
Today's Games
Montreal at New York
Pittsburgh at St. Louis
San Francisco at Atlanta
San Diego at Cincinnati
Los Angeles at Houston

12
1
03
82

R,
Wl
P.
SE

-Ass c4JL rs

Cardinal Jae Torre scores against Mets

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