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July 08, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-08
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~1ip £i~~n ai't
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michiaon Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 8, 1970 News Phone: 764-0552
Democracy 1n 1action
THE MICHIGAN House of Representatives' passage of
a school aid bill which contains a parochiaid provision,
without a doubt, ranks as a monument to abuse of demo-
cratic procedure.
After the bill passed by a vote of 57-49, George Mont-
gomery (D-Detroit) shouted, "Mr. Speaker,.I move im-
mediate- effect." Speaker Pro Tern Stanley Davis (D-Grand
Rapids) then banged his gavel and without taking a vote
declared, "Immediate effect is ordered," although at least
40 members of the House rose to their feet shouting,
"Record roll call!" and, "No, no, you can't do that; let
us vote."
Davis' action was not only a violation of the spirit of
democratic legislative process, but was also a flagrant vio-
lation of the Michigan constitution.
The section of the constitution on legislation states:
"NO act shall take effect until expiration of 90 days from
end of the session at which it was passed, but the Legis-
lature may give immediate effect to acts by a two-thirds
vote of the members elected and serving in each House."
BY PARLIAMENTARY procedure, a two-thirds vote must
always be a roll-call vote or a vote in which the exact
number voting for and against a measure are recorded.
However, in passing the motion for immediate effect,
Davis did not even take a voice vote, he simply declared
the motion passed. It was further obvious from the 49
original votes against the measure and the over 40 repre-
sentatives who verbally protested Davis' illegal action that
the two-thirds majority necessary for immediate effect
was not present.
When asked about Davis' ramrod techniques, House
Speaker William Ryan (D-Detroit) blandly remarked that
the same thing had happened with dozens of bills this
session.
Such a casual disregard for law by the men charged
with making laws is indeed disturbing and raises serious
questions as to the legitimacy of laws perpetrated by that
system.
-LINDSAY CHANEY
NIGHT EDITOR: NADINE COHODAS

Wednesday, July 8, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

music
Rudolf Firkusny at Rackham

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phonie 70
12Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

By R. A. PERRY
Pianist Rudolf Firkusny opened
the Seventh Annual Summer Con-
cert Series, sponsored by the Uni-
versity Musical Society; with a
recital that featured the Op. 109
Piano Sonata of Beethoven and
the Davidbundlertanze of Robert
Schumann; also included in last
night's concert in Rackham were
works by Dvorak and Ravel.
Mr. Firkusny, who gave a
splendid concert two summers ago,
is to the music of Bohemia what
Alicia De Larrocha is to that of
Spain, namely a prime advocate.
His several recordings of Czech
piano music, notably one of Sme-
tana Czech dances and the Dvorak--
Piano Concerto under both Szell
and Somogyi, are well known to
music lovers, though several of
them have been deleted. It was
thus a shame that the pianist
chose only Dvorak's Theme and
Variations, Op. 36 to show off his
forte; furthermore, that piece is
itself not prime Dvorak, more
declamatory than evocative._
Essentially Mr. Firkusny is a
pianist's pianist, an artist who
concerns himself with a fluid so-
lution to "problems" and a pol-
ished presentation of a beautiful
sound; he does not, or at least did
not last night, go a great distance
toward discovering or creating
smaller moments of sweetness and
light between the major thematic
statements and developmental pro-
cesses.
Perhaps, however, the problem
-it's not really a problem-lies
not so much in individual capa-
bility as in a general stylistic ap-
proach. I must admit to having
come to Rackham after many days
of taping rare recordings by such
artists as Elly Ney, Schnabel,
Fischer, early Kempff and Back-
haus, and G ie se k ing, among
others, and listening to them I
was' constantly amazed at the
great expressive powers elicited
from the approach of understate-
ment. Nothing could be further
apart than the "Trout" Quintet
with Ney as pianist and that with
Serkin as pianist; with the latter,
it is the careful placing of each
note to make a meaningful phrase,
with Serkin it is the forceful line
that dominates.
In Beethoven's fascinating 30th
piano sonata, Firkusny was very

much in the modern manner: bel-
ting out the more dramatic state-
ments with vigor and precision,
and playing the "Andante molto
cantabile ed espressivo" with a
preconceived idea as to its beauty.
His performance yeas thus credible
in both presentation of idea and
in technical victories-and occa-
sionally really exciting, as in the
Vth Variation-but it was not
extraordinarily moving or ex-
ploratory.
A similar panache graced the
Davidsbundlertanze, another ex-
ample of Robert Schumann's bor-
ing, endless, schizophrenic braga-
doccio. To be sure, Schumann
could write both winning melodies
and declamations of real fire, but

in the rapid alternation of these
forms, each is debilitated. There is
no accumulation of either meaning
or strategy, and becomes an ex-
perience akin to window shopping.
The University Musical Society
will be bringing three other pi-
anists to air-conditioned and leg-
roomy Rackham Aud. this month.
On July 16th, the"young French
pianist Gabriel Tacchino will per-
form works by Bach, Liszt, Mozart,
Chopin, Poulenc (in which he spe-
cializes), and Prokofieff. Ingrid
Haebler will perform on July 22nd,
playing Haydn, Beethoven, and
the Sonata in B flat by Schubert.
A less well-known artist, James
Mathis, will conclude the series
on July 27th.

Letters to the Editor

Can they forget?
To the Editor-
RECENTLY A STRONG Zionist
viewpoint was presented in a let-
ter to the Daily-which demands
a reply to put things a little more
in perspective. First of all, it
should be pointed out that the
various Palestine liberation organ-
izations are not anti-Jewish; they
are anti-Zionist, a fundamental
distinction.
History clearly shows that re-
lations between Arabs and Jews
for hundreds of years have been
far better in the Middle East than
anywhere else in the world. In-
deed, anti-Jewish attitudes were
born and nurtured 'in the pre-
dominately Christian West where
the perfidious Jews were excluded
from ownership of property, per-
secuted by the Church and shoved
into ghettos. In contrast to the
death campus of Europe, the Lev-
antine Jews prospered as mer-
chants and rose to positions of
great power and responsibility.
Unfortunately, the Arab refugees
have become the innocent victims
of the Nazi tragedy and the Arab
cause has few spokesmen in the
American press.
I CANNOT HELP but reflect on
the tremendous propaganda power

of the Zionist organization in this
country. The relatively small num-
ber of active Zionists can put fear
and trembling into the bones of
President Nixon while the 22 mil-
lion black citizens can barely make
themselves not-iced.
The only reasonable hope of so-
lution to the Middle East imbro-
glio must surely consist of a secu-
lar state of Palestine where the
Palestinian Arabs can live with
rights equal to those of the Pales-
tinian Jews. While it is often
argued by Zionists that Palestine
is the national homeland of the
Jewish people, let us not forget
that it is also the national home-
land of the Palestinian Arabs.
Even the most casual observer
must realize that the 1.5 million
Arab refugees living on 10 cents a
day in the UN ghettos form the
major unresolved question. These
hapless people have come to be-
lieve in a new type of Arab Zion-
ism which dreams of a return to
their national homeland, a home-
land that lies within sight of their
squalid camps. After all, if the
Jewish people can remember for
2,000 years, is it so unreasonable
to think that the Arabs cannot
remember for 20?
George H. Brown, Jr. '70
July 5

FOR RENT
FOR FALL: modern 2-man, close to'
campus, 663-3890. 24043
ROOMS FOR RENT for rest of summer
and some available for fall term.
769-6637. 23C44
APTS.-Sumipier & Fall, on and off-
campus. 1217 S. U. 761-7764. 22048
BARGAIN!-$40. One man needed for'
July-Aug. Arbor Forest Apts. 769-7248.
10040
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 15Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units- on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Cte
1 AND 2 BDRM. furn. units for fall, 1
bdrm. $155 and $160. 2 bdrm. from
$210 for 2, from $225 for 3. Call 663-
1761. 15C44
FURN. APT. for rent 'til Aug. 20. 2250
Fuller Rd. 663-9576 eves. 16045.
SINGLE ROOM. 428 Cross St. AA. $55,
663-3886. 21043
Summit
Associates
CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FALL
761-8055f
490tc
EDINBURGH APTS., 912 Brown St. The
Royal Dutch Apts., 715 Church. The
King's Inn Apts., 1939 Dewey. Tfaking
applications for fall rental for all 3
locations. For rental information call
761-6156 or 761-3466. 4041
CAMPUS
NEW FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
781-7600
380t e
711 ARCH-Near State and Packard-f
Modern 2-bdrm. apts. for Fall. Dish-
washer, balcony, air-cond., and muchr
more. Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Ctc
AVAIL. FOR SU1MMEh & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes1
Beauatifuilly decorated, large 2 bedroom,j
bi-level apartments. Stop" in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 am, to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. llCte

FOR RENT
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL REDUCED, attrac-
tivempaneled small furn. first floor
room for man or woman, 21 or over,
house refrigerator. $10.50/wk. Lease
through Aug. 663-5666 or 971-6270.
19Ctc
911 S. Forest
Near Hill St.-Modern 2 Bdrm., 3-man.
668-6906. Fall. 14Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT,
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
lOCtc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
(2 bdrm. unit-summer 12 term)
Campus area, cool, furnished apart-
ments. 1 and 2 bdrm.-ample park-
ing, contact Resident Manager, Apt.
102, 721 S. Forest St. 16Ctc
Apartments
Limited
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENTS FOR FALL

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Ladies gold watch on July 1,
call Rhonda 764-3032. REWARD. A41
FOUR MO. OLD male tiger cat lost near
Forest and Oakland. 761-1835 after 5.
14A42
FOUND: Small black female puppy,
long hair and tail, 761-1237, owner
call Dave or Roberta. AD42
FOUND: orange pregnant cat in vicini-
ty S. Univ, and Washtenaw, owner or
interested party call 761-3882. AD42
FOUND: 2 mo. old tiger kitten with
white markings. Vicinity Hill St. Call
761-5247 after 5. AD42
LOST?? or stolen!!!-12 speed boy's
racing bike. RED, very small frame;
make: Legnano. Any information call
Nancy, 761-0153. AD43
REWARD: lost blue point siamese cat,
Main-Hoover-Stadium area, please call.
769-6045. 13A40
FOUND by Harvard Valiance-Medium
size pair of glasses for slightly near-
sighted person. B roawn, squarish
shaped. Found before end of spring
half. Contact M. Hirsch at Daily any
time to claim. DA40
PETS AND SUPPLIES
KITTENS and CATS. Cute, trained -
FREE, black, grey, or mixed-up. a
variety of sizes and shapes. Call 665-
4830. TD44
2 FREE CATS
Housebroken-Lovable
665-2565 after 5.
TD44
WANTED TO RENT
NEEDED IMMED.-info. leading to at-
tic room with neat windows to rent
-for fall. Kitchen privileges if possible.
Call Judy collect. 1-626-4024. 16L42
SINGLE APT., normal facilities, for
July-Aug., preferably near campus.
Please reply Box 378, Mich. Daily,
DLtc
BIKES AND SCOOTERS

663-0511
761 -5440

50Ctc

SUMMER SUBLET
OWN BDRM. in large 5 rm. apt., close
to campus, available now. 662-9833.
5U442
JULY-AUG. sublet-Own bedroom in 2-
man on Packard. $35/mo. Peter, 761-
7846. 3U42
ROOM FOR MEN ONLY
$35-Call 668-6906.
4U48
LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are
looking for? Tell them cheaply, yet
effectively in Daily classifieds. 764-
0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. DU
SUMMER RENTALS
Choice Apts. at low rates. Ann Arbor
Trust Co. Phone 769-2800. 22083
4TH MAN NEEDED for modern luxury
apt near campus and med. center.
A,'C, dishwasher, July-Aug. only. Will;
bargain for rates. Call Bob or Frank,
665-7501. DU4
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY near cam-
pus, July 1-Aug. 26. 80 mo. Call 665-
0053 after 5:00 p.m. 49U40
SUMMER SUBLETS
761 -8055

FOR SALE
LOVABLE KITTENS, FREE, 6 wks. old.
Call 665-2805. 131H41
RUMMAGE SALE, sewing notions, pat-
terns, GE baseboard space heater, Per-
sian carpet, men and women's cloth-
ing. July 6-7-8, from 2-8 p.m., 305
Maple Ridge, 761-9861. 9B40
DIVING GEAR
All major brands at discount prices,
Ann Arbor Diver's Co., call Mike Wills.
665-6032 persistently noons or after 5
best, 711 Arch, No. 301, 7B45"
GET THE DRUM set used by the Byrds'
and Commander Cody's drummers!
Ludwig Drums. Full set. Zildjian cym-
bals. Reasonable. Call 761-2704 any-
time. DB40
VOLVO 144S 1968-4-speed, AM radio,
plus set of snow tires, about 21,000
miles, very fine conditiorn. Asking
about $2,000. Call 761-0153 after 5:30
or leave a messagt at 764-4404. BD43
SELL YOURSELF
on Daily classifieds
764-0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557
DB
USED CARS
1965 VW BUS with overhauled engine
and new muffler; outfitted for camp-
ing with sleeping platform, curtain,
hammock, roof carrier; good condi-
tion inside and out; $1050; call 668-
6835 Mon.-Thurs. 9N40
'65 VW-One owner. Make offer. 456-
4967, Clinton. 6N42
'66 FORD Galaxy 500, 2-dr., power
brakes, body and mileage excellent.
$750/best offer. 663-5149. 7N43
CLASSIC CAR - Triumph TR-3, runs
well. Good cond., hard and soft tops.
$795 or best offer. 769-4488. 8N43
'61 BUICK Le Sabre 4-dr. sedan, excel-
lent condition, one owner. $250/offer.
Call 769-0024. DN4O
'63 DODGE DART, in excellent cond.,
$275. Stop by 425 West Washington.
ND45
BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED secretary desires typing
in her home or part time in your of-
fice. Call 971-1533. 27J43
DON'T YOU just hate to type? Let
Candy do it. Cheap, quick, profes-
sional. Call 665-4830. JD44
EXPERIENCED EDITOR
Skilled in organizing and
presenting special projects.
Write Mich. Daily Box 68 or
phone 971-6445.
J35
TYPING-Cheap and fast and profes-
sional. Call Candy, 665-4830. DJ48
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY_ desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS-
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
( service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Pt c
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE

LEA
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WA
FL
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'w

SUZUKI X-6 Hustler, 250cc, roadma-
chine. FAST. 2500 mi. $429 or offer.
769-4488. 21Z43
'68 OSSA $75, needs some work. Call
453-8623. ZD48
'67 HONDA CB 160 with cover, extra
back tire, helmet, $275. Call Steve
Mooney, 763-3117 or 769-1844. 18Z41
HELP WANTED
LIVE-IN babysitter for two delightful
tots, 5 and 7, for remainder of sum-
mer in motherless home. Room, salary
and meals. Call mornings or evenings
761-2023. HD
INTERESTED IN GIVING TOURS OF
Central Campus? Prospective Univer-
sity of Michigan students and their
families are eager to be shown the
campus. If you have a spare hour a
week to volunteer your services,
please call Betty van den Bosch at
the Alumni Association - 764-0384--

Will Nixon use atomic weapons in Asia?

By RICHARD BARNET
THE PRESIDENT'S sudden decision to
invade Cambodia dramatizes the dan-
gers of permitting the war to drag on
and exposes the American people to many
risks. Specifically, the serious risk that
nuclear weapons might be used in a
similar mistaken effort to achieve a de-
cisive military victory must now be
strongly disposed to use tactical nuclear
weapons in Indo-China.
The risk is based on the following evi-
dence:
1. As of 1968 there were more than
5,500 nuclear weapons in the Southeast
Asia area. Most of these weapons are
aboard carriers and can be brought to
Vietnam extremely rapidly. A substantial
number of nuclear weapons are located
on the mainland in Korea. Nuclear weap-
ons are also located in Thailand, accord-
ing to reliable reports of knowledeable
Pentagon officials and military officers.
2. Until 1965 the Commander in Chief
of the Pacific (CINCPAC) had no plans
or weapons capabilities to fight other
than a nuclear war in Southeast Asia.k
During the Vietnam buildup both plans
and weapons for non-nuclear war were
developed. However, senior officers of the
- area still appear to subscribe to the view
that nuclear weapons are "conventional."
There is substantial military doctrine de-
veloped in the 1950's and early 1960's
prescribing. the specific circumstances
under which nuclear weapons would be
used in terrain such: as Vietnam and their
effects. In "Nuclear Weapons and Limit-
ed War," an article appearing in Air Uni-
versity Review, General Frederic H. Smith
Jr. writes: "We cannot afford to lose
friendly nations and territories to the
USSR, Red China, or their satellites un-
der any circumstances. . . . The purpose
of this article is to demonstrate that not

only can the intelligent use of nuclear
firepower in limited war give us the
greatest possible opportunity to win such
wars at minimum cost . . . but that it is
highly probable that without the use of
such weapons, our chances of winning in
many areas are slim indeed." One of such
areas described in detail is typical of
Vietnam.
3. President Nixon appears to share the
view expressed by General Eisenhower
to his biographer that the threat to use
nuclear weapons in Korea was instru-
mental in bringing an end to that war.
On March 17, 1955, Mr. Nixon, then Vice
President, told the Executives Club of
Chicago:
"...Our artillery and our tactical air
force in the Pacific are now equipped with
atomic explosives which cin and will be
used on military targets with precision
and effectiveness.
"It is foolish to talk about the possi--
bility that the weapons which might be
used in the event war breaks out In the
Pacific would be limited to the conven-
tional Korean and World War II types of
k explosives. Our forces could not fight an
effective war in the Pacific with those
types of explosives if they wanted- to
Tactical atomic explosives are now con-
ventional and will be used against the
military targets of any aggressive force.'
IN HIS PRESS conference of May 8,
1970, President Nixon pointedly observed
that the days of incremental or piece-
meal escalation were over. He defended
the Cambodian adventure as -a decisive
step and hinted that there would be
others in the event of major enemy
action.
4. Twice before the United States has
seriously considered the use of tactical:
nuclear weapons in Indo-China. At the
time of the. Battle of Dienbienphu, Ad-.

miral Radford and John Foster Dulles
proposed to French generals and political
leaders that atomic bombs be used to re-
lieve the garrison at Dienbienphu. The
plan was known as "Operation Vulture."
Under pressure from the military, Pres-
ident Johnson gave serious consideration
to the use of tactical nuclear weapons to
relieve the garrison at Khe Sanh in 1968.
Reports that the White House was sound-
ing out Congressional reaction to such
a move elicited a strong public reaction
and all such plans were dropped.
5. The most plausible evidence that
there is a substantial risk is the lack of
alternative military options given the
character of the war and the "Vietnam-
ization" program. Let us assume that
President Nixon does reduce the Amer-
ican force level in Vietnam to 200,000 or
less and confines them to enclaves. As-
sume further that at such point the North
Vietnamese and the NLF launch major
offensives against South Vietnamese
forces, a highly probable contingency un-
less they believe that the U.S. means to
pull all its troops out in a reasonable
'time. It is equally likely that they will
overrun the Sohth Vietnamese army, thus
leaving the U.S. with the options of ex-
ecuting a Dunkirk-like evacuation, sitting
idly by in enclaves while the forces they
are supposedly there to protect are
slaughtered, or carrying out a sudden"
dramatic escalation. The possibilities of
escalation are severely limited. Bringing
massive numbers of U.S. troops back
would be tactically and politically. im-
- possible. .
6. It is impossible to know how sub-
stantial these risks.- are, although it is
clear from the structure of the military,
military doctrine, the President's own
past thinking, and the developing situ-
ation on the battlefield, that the ilsks are
not trivial. Once such weapons are used,

Campus-Hospital _
ROOMMATES WANTED 1
F a I OCCUanC 1 MAN for 4 man modern apt. for fall
Fp on campus. 8 mo. lease. Call Jeff in
Furnished Apartments Detroit after 7 P.M. 1-KE-4-3893. Y41
FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted to share
Campus Management, inc. apt. in Fall, prefer grad-professionals.
662-7787 335 E. Huron Reply Box 55, Daily. 1Y4s
47Ctc WOMAN GRAD WANTED TO SHAREj
BARGAN ~R ER j2-man, 2-bdrm. apt. In house close
BARGAIN CORNER 1 _ to campus. Call Sara, 769-1325. 11Y44
WOMAN GRAD wanted to share really
nice apt. Own room. Rent negot. 764-
am S tore 510 mornings, or 662-0348 evenings.
N EE LS VI MUSICA L MDSE., D4
NEED LEVIS ?RADIOS, REPAIRS
VISIT SANYO Cassette tape recorder, new, w/ '
US - microphone and tapes, AD/DC, for
us FO P further info. call 769-5474. 8X41
F OR PORTABLE STEREO 8-track tape play-

events will move very fast and it will be
exceedingly difficult for Rublic cr Con-
gressional protest to have any effect.
THERE IS NO REASON, if in fact we
are not,,going to use those nuclear wea-
pons that they should be there. The
threat that we are going to use them, or
reserve the options to use them, can only
have the effect of bringing this war into
a -mch greater conflagration and con-
vince the other side- that we have ab-
solutely no intention of negotiating or of
getting out.
The prospect of the use of nuclear wea-
pons, horrible as it is, is raised because
although it is something apparently mad,
people should confront it in a straight-
forward fashion. The lack of public pro-
test and demonstration of real public
anger will, by the momentum of events,
allow the President to take the fateful
chance. C
* College PressK Service

1he A."m...1A~saiat ionC. - 74.- Ou -
between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or
call John Hamilton at 761-7808 in the
evenings. 6H43
OWNER OF 60 ft. schooner plans 1-3
yr. world cruise. Needs cameraman
experienced with 16 mm color film.
Also needs competent nurse. Pay var-
ies from low to non-existent. Write
Leo A. Frankowski, 185 Puritan, High-'
land Park, Michigan. 5H42
LAW ENFORCEMENT DIRECTOR
NIacomb County Law Enforcement and
Criminal Justice Commission are
seeking the services of a Law En-
forcement Director to co-ordinate the
activities of the commission and pro-
vide a liaison between the local, re-
gional and state planning groups and
law enforcement agencies within the
County.
Applicants must possess at least a
baccalaureate degree or qualifications
acceptable to the Crime Commission
and have some experience with the
components of a Criminal Justice
System.
Salary, depending upon qualifications.
Maximum $15,000.00.
Send resume t4:
Edmund A. Schmidt
Chairman Judiciary Public Safety
Committee
Board of Commissioners
County Building
Mt. Clemens, Michigan 48043
4H4-
WANTED: undergraduate to assist pro-
fessor (in Wheelchair) in return for
room and board, 781-9034 after 5.
-H44
ART STUDENTS who are now taking,
or have recently taken painting
courses wanted for psych experiment
Total time will be about 2 hours
spread over 3 testing sessions, pay
$2.50/hr Call 'David Shapiro, days,
429-2531, or eves., 663-9769, to set up
appt. 50H41
EARN $25 by donating cerebrospinal
fluid. Need 21-40 yr. old males-fe-
males. 764-0298. 1H42
AMERICAN MALE U.M. students need-
ed for % hr. psych, experiment. Pay
$2 plus winnings. Phone 668-7626 be-
tween 6-8 p.m., Mon.-Fri. Askfor
Alvin. 2H143

BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims.......6.50
Button-Fly........ 6.50
Traditional .......6.98
Bells ............7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS .. .......2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's . .. 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sto-Prest "White"
Levi's ... ......6.98
Nuvo's ........... 8.50
Over 7000 Poirs in Stock!
Sam'S Store
122 E. Washington

er and 13 assorted tapes for $60Call
769-0162. 9X41}
RECORDS!
Oldies! 20,000 in Stock. Send 35c
for 2,000 listing catalog. Mail Or-
ders Filled. RECORD CENTER,
1895 W. 25th-Cleve., Ohio. Record
Tapes. 31X1
FOR SALE-Stereo system - 70 watt
amp., FM tuner, pair of bookshelf
spkrs. 662-9712 persistently. 10X41
RADIO, TV, Hi-Fi repair. House calls--
Very reasonable! Very cheap! 769-
6250. DX42
STEREO SYSTEM - Garard 50 turn-
table, XAM 25 watt amp, 2 double-
XAM speakers, 4 mo. old SONY tuner,
25 records; $200/offer. Call 769-0024,
DX40
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Acoustic, electric instruments, acces-
series, David lessons-repairs, Gibson,
Harmony. 209 S. State. 665-8001. 10-7
p.m. X,

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Thests service

Papers
Dissertationsa
General Ofie and Secretwrial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 971-2446
Jkc

EXPERIENCED editor with six years
university teaching, M.A. 'Plus Ph.D.-
hours in literature, desires free-lance
editing, writing. 662-0348 evenings.
D.9}

RADICAL FILM SER

JEAN RENOIR'S
RULES

OF THE

75c-

GA

"A BRILLIANT SATIRE OF FF
CANTERBURY HSE.-

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