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July 08, 1970 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-08
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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 8, 1970

Wednesday, July 8, 1970'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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By 1he Associa/cd Press
A HOUSE COMMERCE subcommittee yesterday approved a
bill setting limits on broadcast spending by candidates for federal
offices and governors in both general and primary elections.
It would take effect on Jan. 1, 1971.
The measure was an expansion of a bill the Senate passed last
April which limited the spending by candidates only for federal offices
and only in general elections.
A CITIZENS COMMITTEE yesterday proposed a national
health insurance program for everyone, rich and poor, to be
financed by a method similar to Social Security.
The plan, called a "iealth Security Program," was set forth by a
committee of 100 brought together by the late union leader Walter
P. Reuther more than a year ago to develop a comprehensive program.
* * *
THE UNITED STATES will replace recent and future Israeli
jet plane losses attributed to missiles fired along the Suez Canal
until Egypt accepts the American proposal for a temporary
cease-fire, the New York Post reported yesterday.
The newspaper quoted "reliable diplomatic sources" as saying
that this country has made "under-the-table commitments" to
"quietly replace" the three Phantom jets-two last Tuesday and an-
other on Sunday-which Israel claims were downed by Egyptian
ground-to-air missiles supplied by the Soviet Union.

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College,
closings
foreseen
NEW YORK ()-As President Nixon
met in Washington yesterday with ad-
visers on campus unrest, there were re-
ports that they will advise him that num-
erous colleges and universities might not
be able to open this fall.
The President's Commission on Campus
Unrest, created June 13 to study campus
disorder and make recommendations by
Oct. 1, is expected to hold hearings start-
ing within two weeks. William Matthew
Byrne Jr. of Los Angeles, a former U.S.
attorney for central California, was ap-
pointed yesterday as executive director
of the nine-member commission.
Nixon's meeting was with Dr. Alex-
ander' Heardi, chancellor of Vanderbilt
University, and Dr. James Cheek, presi-
dent of Howard University, together with
Robert Finch, counselor to the president.
The White House issued no report on
the meeting. But two television networks,
NBC and ABC, have reported that Cheek
and Heard will submit a written report
saying that extreme anger and discord
among students might prevent numerous
campuses from opening in the fall.
The 'networks said the report will tell
Nixon: "The University of California at
Berkeley, as an institution of freedom
and learning, is dead . . . Columbia Uni-
versity is faltering badly and may be dead
within a few years.
In Berkeley, UC Chancellor Roger W.
Heyns said he could not comment on the
report, not having seen it, but said "to
suggest that it is dead is absurd."
"There have been abuses of academic
freedom on the campus and attacks on it
from the outside, but the campus is alert
to these threats and is determined to de-
fend that freedom.
Columbia University President Dr. An-
drew Cordier was not available for com-
ment but a spokesman for the university
said:
"While the pressures facing society in
general and universities and colleges in
particular are perhaps as great now as at
any time in modern history, Columbia
fully anticipates meeting the challenges
whether it be in September of this year
or in 1975, or, for that matter, at any
time in the future."
According to the broadcast accounts,
"the inflammatory rhetoric of Vice Pres-
ident Agnew" is blamed by the report for
contributing to the student anger and
discord.
Heard and Cheek reportedly will call
on Nixon to take emergency measures of
diplomacy in an attempt to ease the aca-
demic situation.
The commission, created in .the after-
math of the shooting deaths of students
in Ohio and Mississippi this spring, is
chaired by f o r m e r Gov. William W.
Scranton of Pennsylvania.

Pr esident

halts s~

FOURTEEN HOSPITALIZED

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WASHINGTON (iP)-President Nix-
on ordered striking workers of three,
major railroads back to their jobs last
night. stopping for 60 days a threaten-
ed nationwide rail shutdown.
Nixon invoked a section of the Rail-
way Labor Act that provides for a 30-
day cooling-off period while a newly
created emergency board holds hear-
ings and makes recommendations for
a settlement of the longstanding dis-
pute between the United Transporta-
tion Union and the' railroads over re-
storing firemen's jobs.
The act also provides that there
can be no work stoppage for 30 days
after the board has made its report
to the President.
Nixon intervened even though Fed-
eral Judge Barrington Parker had al-
ready ordered the union to halt the
walkout pending a hearing tomorrow
on the railroads' request for an in-
junction stopping the strike. Court pro-

ceedings would have determined the
legality of the strike.
The union struck the Baltimore &
Ohio, the Louisville & Nashville and
the Southern Pacific earlier yesterday.
The railroad industry responded by
threatening a nationwide lockout of
the union workers by all lines.
Shortly after Nixon's order, the
Labor Department said it had been
informed that the strikers would re-
turn to work as soon as possible, and
that the industry had rescinded its
consideration of a lockout.
The President's order was aimed
specifically at the three struck lines,
but Press Secretary Ronald L. Ziegler
said it affects other railroads repre-
sented by the National Railway Labor
Conference as well.
Nixon acted on the recommendation
of the National Mediation board and
Secretary of Labor James W. Hodgson.

He named
ly a media
man of the
The str
UTU mem
ment spok
of 78,000 v
Trains
states, strE
hampering
Rail tra
New York,
Virginia, I
Florida,
Arizona. L
Oregon.
The pre
the railro
practices.
clear," Chf
"a simple
bargain in
men issue

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Asbury I
ASBURY PARK, N.J. (R) - Fourteen
persons were hospitalized with gunshot
wounds yesterday after state police used
shotguns and tear gas to repel an attack
by young blacks hurling fire bombs and
rocks.
More than 60 persons, including five
state troopers, were treated at a hospital
for injuries after the battle on the third
day of racial disorder in this New Jersey
seashore community.
One of the 14 gunshot victims in the
hospital was critical, and one was listed
in poor condition. Two other persons were
admitted with lacerations.
Another 32 persons were released after
treatment for minor gunshot wounds.
State Police admitted firing warning
shots but offered no explanation for the
wounds.
At nightfall, police said the situation
had calmed down. The battle began when
a crowd of blacks, estimated by state po-
lice at nearly 1,000, invaded the main
downtown business district, breaking win-
dows in shuttered stores.
Troopers, some using clubs, herded the
youths back across the railroad tracks
which separate downtown from the trou-
bled West End. The youths then turned
and pelted officers with rocks, bottles
and gasoline bombs.
. Officers fired shotguns and pistols over
the heads of the crowd, then followed
with tear gas as the blacks retreated up
Springwood Avenue, the main area of
trouble.
Before the outburst, the most violent
battle since trouble began Sunday, city
authorities were reported to have met in
whole or part 14 of 20 demands presented

[)ark riots com

Now Showing-!

polyester
knits move

NEW JERSEY STATE POLICE scatter to avoid a n

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their midst during rioting in Asbury Park.
by some black leaders. Among demands
not met were those for removal of outside +
police and amnesty for those arrested.
Other demands called for help in em-
ployment, housing and law enforcement.
State Police listed 125 arrests since 5
p.m. Monday, 15 of them during yester-
day's foray. As dark fell, troopers sealed
off a 20-block area under a strict curfew.
Among those arrested was Dell Wade,
a newsman for New York's WABC-TV. He
said he was clubbed and seized while re-
porting the afternoon b a t t 1 e. Police

charged 1h
officer.
Railroad
any comm
further no
the Jersey
Asbury Pa
Penn Cent
The city'
S. Smith,
looting and
"It's hot
it's going

PANEL EXAMINES PROBLEM

Campus unrest:

Only for mi

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I

7

DRESS SALON
Second Floor of Fashion

By ERIKA HOFF
Seven University faculty members, President
Robben Fleming and Sen. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann
Arbor) last night attempted to discover who is
responsible for campus unrest.
And after two hours of discussion, no one could
put his finger on the solution execept to affirm
that academic freedom must be maintained while
the problem is being solved.
Fleming began the discussion, sponsored by
the First Presbyterian Church and the Ecumenical
Campus Center, by criticizing Vice President
Spiro Agnew's analysis of the problem as "over-
simplified. Attributing the unrest on campuses
to a few 'misfits' is an oversimplified analysis
and does little to solve the problem," he said.
History Prof. Stephen Tonsor agreed that Ag-
new's analysis was oversimplified, but added, "We
do need to get misfits off the campus. There are
a lot of people there who really don't belong
there, and campus unrest will exist until we solve

this problem in soi
added.
The "weeding c
said, would have t
lature and the Reg
Replying to To
Joseph Payne said
return of the McCE
threaten academic
Sen. Bursley al
saying the Univ'ers'
stitutional indeper,
problems trying to
herds in the legis
Tonsor enmhas4
unrest on campuse
from the society a
have its own vale
accept or else the U
Payne challenge
the purpose of the
which must neces:
itself and society as

I~O JaoSZ

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LIBERTY AT MAYNARD-ANN ARBOR

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