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July 07, 1970 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

* p

qt n
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editoriok orired in The Michioon Doily exors, the individual
ooinions of the author. This must be noted in all reorints.

*uesday, July -, ,1970

p

THE MICHGAN DAILY *

Student-faculty committees
desperately need alteration

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1970

News Phone: 764-0552

Leadership a la. Saigon
1O YOU EVER get the feeling the government backs
the wrong horse in Vietnam? Ostensibly, U.S. troops
are over there fighting for democracy and for the right
of the Vietnamese people to choose their own democratic
government. And ostensibly, the current Saigon rulers
and everyone since the Diem regime in the early 1950's
have been the officials who fit this description.
But every now and then the men in Saigon do some-
thing that seems to blacken the illusion and we over here
notice that those the Administration backs are no better
and perhaps worse than other alternatives.
Such an incident occurred yesterday when the South
Vietnamese government seized 10 Saigon newspapers for
carrying a dispatch reporting Secretary of State William
P. Rogers' suggestion that the Viet Cong might negotiate
a war settlement based on proportional representation.
THE GOVERNMENT charged that the story "did not re-
flect accurately on what Mr. Rogers said." U.S. offi-
cials, however, said they took no issue with the dispatch.
This clearly is an undemocratic way to do things and
conjures up all the totalitarian bogey men this country
claims to be fighting against. According to the American
way, one doesn't seize a newspaper because one disa-
grees with its editorial policy or political philosophy. In-
stead such disagreement can be solved by writing a coun-
ter article stating the other side or correcting what is
claimed to be incorrect, or if need be, a law suit against
the paper ensues.
But Saigon ignored these routes and chose to shut
down the papers. And the U.S. chooses to stand by this
government regardless of the reality that so blatantly
clashes with what this country purports to hold dear.
We look pretty silly, don't we . . .
-NADINE COIODAS
Discussing urs
without any students
rT'HIS EVENING, President Robben Fleming, the Honor-
able Gilbert E. Bursley, several University deans as
well as faculty members will participate in a panel dis-
cussion, "Campus unrest-causes and directions for the
future." A noticeable absence from the panel of "experts"
is students.
The panel tonight will fail in its attempts to discover
the causes of campus unrest because they are ignoring a
vital interest in that unrest-the students who make up
the campuses.
-ALEXA CANADY
---GHT-EDITOR--RO ---~ER
NIGHT EDITOR: ROB BI ER

(EaiTOWR S NOTE: Te following is
a copy of a menmorandum-iSent to P'res-
ident Fleming, and the first in a ser-
ies of articles discussing the role of the
student-faculty committee.)
By JAMES 11. McELROY
r 1HE UNIVERSITY has estab-
lished various student-faculty
committees to advise the admin-
istration to adopt procedures and
policies to make these committees
effective.
The following examples of short-
comings and inadequacies of pres-
ent procedures and practices are
listed to illustrate the need for
change. The listed examples are
drawn from the experience of one
committee. But discussions with
members of other committees re-
vealed these experiences are re-
flective of general conditions:
1) The Financial Aid Advisory
Committee in a June 2, 1969,
memorandum to Vice President
Newell made proposals on the Uni-
versity's involvement in the Fed-
eral Guaranteed Loan program. As
of June 4, 1970, the committee has
not received a formal written re-
sponse to that memorandum;
2) On February 5, 1970, after
Vice President Spurr assumed re-
sponsibility for the Office of Fi-
nancial Aid, a member of the Fi-
nancial Aid Committee sent Spurr
a fellow-up memorandum request-
ing action on the proposals in the
Newell memorandum (item 1
above): As of June 4, 1970 there
has been no formal response from
Spurr on that memorandum;
3) Since before November 1969,
the Director- of Financial Aid has
repeatedly been asked-both in
and out of committee meetings-
his schedule of the planned major
activities that will occupy his and
his office's time over the next year.
It was requested that goals and
intermediate steps in achieving
these goals be listed with expected
dates for their accomplishment.
Such a device would have been
very useful to the committee in
understanding and influencing of-
fice operation.
As of June 4, 1970, no listing has
been prepared for the committee,
nor does it appear that such a list
exists for the office to monitor its
own activities;
4) It has been repeatedly re-
quested in and out of committee
meetings that meeting time not be
spent with lectures and oral pre-
sentations from the Financial Aid
Office Director on informational
items-items that could be more
clearly and permanently covered
in writing. It is recognized that the
office director has many demands
on his time and that writing re-
ports for the committee would be
an additional burden. However,
written presentations would be
better. Written reports would pro-
vide committee members a per-
manent record of information and

would make oral repetition un-
necessary each time that infor-
mation was needed. Presentation
of information in writing would
then make more meeting time
available for discussion and ex-
change among committee mem-
bers.
As of June 4, 1970, no written
reports have been presented to the
committee concerning operations
of the Financial Aid Office;
5) During a discussion in May
1969, E. A. Cummiskey, University
Counsel, replied to a request for
legal help from the Financial Aid
Committee. Cummiskey said his
work schedule did not allow his of-
fice to provide legal assistance to
the committee. Cummiskey sug-
gested the. committee solicit aid
from law school professors;
6) In December 1969,athe Of-
fice of Financial Aid was moved
from Vice President Newell's to
Vice President Spurr's responsi-
bility. The committee on Financial
Aid was not consulted about the
move until after it had been ac-
complished; and
7) In March 1970, the director-
ship of Financial Aid was changed
from a full time position to a half
time position without-at any
time-consulting the committee.
The director told the committee
about the change after it was
made.
THE LISTED EXPERIENCES
reflect:
1) Poor administrative practices
and lack of planning in the ad-
ministration;
2) Little respect and/or lack of
caring by the administration for
student and faculty input on Uni-
versity leadership decision making;
and
3) Inability of administration
officials to work with committees
in responsive ways that use the
considerable skills of most com-
mittee members.
IT IS REQUESTED that the
President of the University and
the executive officers adopt and
implement the following proposals
and procedures as policy in the
administration's dealings with stu-
dent-faculty committees.
1) Administration officials deal-
ing with student-faculty commit-
tees should consider committee
work a major part of their execu-
tive function. It should be -looked
upon as an integral part of their
administrative responsibilities -
not as collateral duty. Consistent
with this, the highest priority
should normally be given to time
needed for committee work;
2) All written correspondence,
memoranda, proposals, requests,
etc., made by committees or com=
mittee members to administration
officials should be answered in
writing within two weeks of re-

ceipt. Responses should be specific
and clear and should have accom-
plishment dates attached to all
action requests. This does not
mean that all action decisions
must be made within two weeks.
But if items are not settled, dates
would be established for when
they would be settled. These dates
would be viewed as commitment
dates. In addition this policy
would not preclude the immediate
return of a proposal that was un-
clear or frivolous. Returning
memoranda, however, wouldbe
specific in what is unclear and
what is frivolous;
3) Upon request, administration
officials would provide commit-
tees and committee members with
schedules of their and their of-
fices' intended activitiesfor a fu-
ture period of time so that com-
mittees could have some influence
in establishing priorities for ad-
ministration work;
4) Research, legal, and clerical
aid and supportive office services
should be readily available to all
committees and committee mem-
bers for committee work;
5) Information provided com-
mittees by administration officials
would normally be presented in
brief written reports. This would
include information requested by
committees and committee mem-
bers;
6) All administration activities
and decisions concerning Univer-
sity units for which committees
have been created will be made in
consultation with the committees.
The committees will decide what
their level of involvement will be;
and
7) Funds should be made avail-
able for committee members' cler-
ical, travel, telephone, mail, and
other expenses resulting from
comimittee work.
NOTHING IS SAID in the fore-
going about. increasing the level
and quality of student and faculty
input in committee work. Surely a
tremendous gain could be and
should be made in this area. It is
felt that once there exists a true
opportunity for influence, student
and faculty productivity on com-
mittees will rise. A first step must
be made and adoption of _these
proposals would seem appropriate
as that first step.
Letters to the Editor should
be mailed to the Editorial Di-
rector or delivered to Mary
Rafferty in the Student Pub-
lications business office in the-
Michigan Daily building. Let-
ters should be typed, double-
spaced and normally should not
exceed 250 words. The Editorial
Directors reserve the right to
edit all letters submitted.

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