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July 03, 1970 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-03
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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, July 3, 1970

Friday, July 3, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

HEW:
WASHINGTON /P)-Reviving
a civil rights weapon that was
largely abandoned a year ago,
the Department of Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare yesterday
threatened t h r e e segregated
southern school districts with
loss of federal funds unless they
dismantle dual systems for
blacks and whites.
Secretary Elliot L. Rickhard-
son said the districts' federal
education money would be cut
off in 30 days unless they com-
ply with desegregation guide-
lines.
With one exception, the cutoff
device-used extensively by the

may

cut southern schools'

Johnson administration to en-
force Supreme Court desegrega-
tion orders-has lain dormant
since last August.
Named yesterday as targets
for loss of federal assistance
were the Hendry County Board
of Public Instruction in Florida,
Nacogdoches Independent School.
District in Texas and the Ches-
ter County School District in
South Carolina.
The South Carolina and Flor-
ida districts were among hold-
out, segregated southern districts-
threatened with legal action by
the Justice Department. -
Richardson said his depart-

ment will "maintain communi-
cation" with the three districts
and "provide all assistance nec-
essary to bring them into com-
pliance with the law."
Spokesmen for the depart-
ment could not say immediately
how much money is involved
in the cutoff threat.
The only other such action in
the past 10 months was May 12
against the Pewitt Independent
School District at Omaha, Tex.
The district's federal funds have
been shut off.
Nixon administration officials
indicated last year they pre-
ferred taking holding districts
to court through desegregation
suits rather than ending federal
asistance. They maintained the
cutoffs hurt the students, black
as well as white, more than the
school boards responsible for the
dual systems.
Civil rights groups, however,
saw the policy shift then as a
backing away from the federal
commitment to end illegal segre-
gation in Southern schools.
Jerris Leonard, chief of the
Justice Department's civil rights
division,rhinted Wednesday the
administration would resume
use of the cutoff provision of the

Civil Rights Act of 1964 to gain
desegregation compliance.
Asked about the possibility
'following a meeting with Rich-
ardson, Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchell and Postmaster Gen-
eral Winton M. Blount, Leonard
replied: "That's a potential
course of action."
But Leonard indicated the
administration will attempt to
avoid using "an iron fist"
against districts that have es-
caped federal legal action for

funds
16 years after the high court's
dictum to erase dual school
facilities for blacks and whites.
After the Wednesday meet-
ing Leonard said the emphasis
this fall would be on securing
local cooperation as it has been
for most of this year.
He did not rule out the pos-
sibility of bringing statewide
suits in areas where school
segregation is too widespread to
handle by individual litigation,
however.

"DAZZLING AND TO THE POINT!"
-Penelope Gillioft, The New Yorker
"BRILLIANT! REMARKABLE!
-Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek

Cool

4

DIAL

f,.

PRESIDIO CASES:
Army throws out
mutiny convictions

WASHINGTON (P) -- The
Army Court of Military Review'
yesterday threw out mutiny
convictions against 12 soldiers
who were involved in a 1968 sit-
downwdemonstration at the San
Francisco Presidio stockade.
At the same time, the review
court upheld court-martial con-
viction of the 12 on the lesser
offense of willful disobedience
of an order of a commissioned
officer.
The court also affirmed find-
ings against a 13th soldier who
was convicted of willful dis-
obedience.
The action completes review
of court-martial convictions
handed out to a total of 24 sol-
diers in connection with the
Presidio incidentmon Oct. 14,
1968. Thus all 23 men convicted
of mutiny have been cleared
of that charge.
Previously, one case was
thrown out and convictions of
10 other soldiers were reduced
from mutiny to disobedience of
an order.
The 24 soldiers were tried
af terthey sat down near the
stockade in protest against what
they called mistreatment by
guards, poor food unsanitary
living conditions and overcrow-
ding.
After refusing an order to go
back to the stockade, most of
them were charged with mutiny.
Courts-martial levied sen-
tences as severe as 15 years in
prison and dishonorable dis-
charges.
The military review court has
reduced penalties to bad con-
duct, discharges, forfeiture of
pay and allowances and im-

prisonment at hard labor for as
much as one year.
The new Army announcement
said conviction of Pvt. Danny R.
Seals of Orangevale, Calif., on
charges of disobedience of an
order was upheld along with a
sentence of bad conduct dis-
charge, confinement at hard
labor six months and forfeiture
of all pay and allowances.
In the case of the other 12,
the review court held that the
evidence "was sufficient as a
matter of fact to support a con-
viction of the offenses of mu-
tiny."
But the Army review court
held that the evidence sustained
court martial findings of guilty
of the willful disobedience

'U

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
July 3 and 4
THE BLACKBOA'RD JUNGLE
dir. RICHARD BROOKS, 1955_
Starring: SIDNEY PORTIER
GLENN FORD
ANNE FRANCIS
The Pioneer of Ghetto Films
(Cinema Guild takes this space to wish
all its patrons a happy Fourth of July)
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM
Order Your Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558

BILLIARDS
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
FOOSBALL
M UNION.
OPEN THIS
WEEKEND

I

ORSEnN IS FEAR
A CARLO PONTI PRESENTATION
DISTRIBUTED BYI] SIGMA 1I. A FILMWAYS COMPANY
""AN OVERGROUND SEX-PROTEST FILM."
Archer Winston, Now York Past
"AN IMPERTINENT,
DELICIOUS LITTLE SATIRE.
Rex Reed. Wome's e5a,~r pasy
GreeIng

A =SIGMA il RELEASE + IN COLOR

ax .- no',ur

I

PRESENTS
Rudolf-
FIRKUSNY
RENOWNED CZECH-BORN PIANO VIRTUOSO
at the
FIRST CONCERT OF THE SUMMER SERIES

R ,Us "*wm* M" da It will a fr t h o r+, a* * o
t
S
:news briefs&
R Z*4 tot t*t ,1 . *v w *s'h A 4tIt0A1t0
By The Associated Press
THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION is under-
taking a full-scale investigation of "the circumstances surround-
ing the financial debacle of the Penn Central Transportation
Company," Sens. Warren G. Magnuson( D-Wash), and Vance
Hartke (D-Ind), announced yesterday.
The two senators said in a statement they had requested the
probe of the railroad which has filed a petition for reorganization
under the bankruptcy laws.
Magnuson is chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, and
Hartke is chairman of its surface transportation subcommittee.
THE NATION'S JOBLESS RATE dropped from five per cent
to 4.7 per cent in June-the first decline in six months-the
government reported yesterday.
The Labor Department said the decline occurred almost entirely
among adult women, as unemployment for adult males, married men
and teen-agers remained virtually unchanged over the month.
Nonform payroll employment declined by 215,000 in June to
seasonally adjusted 74,671,000, the third consecutive monthly reduc-
tion. About one-half of .the drop occurred in durable goods manu-
facturing, where employment has fallen by nearly 700,000 since last
September.
ATTY. GEN. JOHN MITCHELL yesterday outlined guide-
lines police should follow in handling political demonstrations.
In a speech at San Antonio, Tex. Mitchell said peaceful exercise
of freedom of speech and assembly should be encouraged by state
and local officials even though it may create some inconvenience.'
Police must "realize that most large political demonstrations
may entail a certain amount of inconvenience to local residents, may
impose additional expenses on local taxpayers and may engender!
widespread community hostility to demonstrators," the attorney
general said.
"Given our times," Mitchell added, "we cannot expect political
demonstrations to be conducted like prayer meetings."
Eves &AI1LMatinees
6:25, 9:05 _1 :00,3:40
rcctton in .moem eo'nJ '
"'AI R PORT' is a great film all the way!"
-Chica go Daily News
A ROSS HUNTER Production
BURT LANCASTER.- DEAN MARTIN
0 JEAN SEBERG - JACQUELINE BISSET -GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES VAN HEFLIN -'MAUREEN STAPLETON
- BARRY NELSON " LLOYD NOLAN A InCHNmICOtQ
DANA WYNTER - BARBARA HALE ©~
Mon.-Thurs. Fri.-Sat. All Day
Eves -'; EEves. ' Sundav
$2.25 $2.50 $2.25
Matinees Monday thru Saturday $1.75
DOUBLE FEATURE
ME JEN-PAU

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Fo
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to
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too
Hc
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ca
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fac
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the
lot
W
the
wcl
are
W1
cer

Tues., July

7,

8:30

charges.

NGC THEATRE CORPORATION M-Thur. 8:15 only
NO A NATIONAL GENERAL COMPANY Fri. 6:30, 10:00
FOX VULLUUE 1:30 5:30,
SHOWING H VILL GE un. 1:00, 4:30,
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300 8:15
a wadleigh-maurice, ltd. production
technicolor® from warner bros.
PASS LIST SUSPENDED

IN RACKIAM AUDITORIUM
(AIR-CONDITIONED)
PROGRAM
Sonata in E major, Op. 109 .............. Beethoven
Davidsbunderlertanze Schumann
Theme and Variations. .. .. Dvorak
La Vallee des cloches, and
Alborada del Gracioso from "Miroirs" Ravel
TICKETS: $5.00-$4.00-$2.50
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104
Office Hours: Mon. through Fri. 9 to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12
(Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Rackham Auditorium 1 % hours before performance time)

L

i

0

pros|it.
The brewing of beer is as old
as agriculture itself.
Beer has been made by vir-
tually all people at all stages
of civilization.
Today Germany leads the
world in beer production.
The barley and hops of Upper
Bavaria, brewed with the
skill of German brewmasters,
produces a lager superior to
all.
The Old Heidelberg carries
the very best of German beers.
A glass of cold German beer.
Fun-loving people-dancing,
laughing, singing.
The Old Heidelberg.. .join us.

The 18th amendment prohibited drinking.
It didn't say a word about killin,
double-crossing or blowing things up.

I

THE BRIDE k; " tura £V1
AS ADVERTISED! BELMONDO
CATHERINE
DENEUVE
"MISSISSIPPI
MERMAID"
j Screenplay and Directed by
£ 1FILANCOIS
COLOR by DeLuxe [GP
MIRISCH PICTURES presents
"BEST
PICTURE!"
Winner of
10 Academy PANAVISION*~
Awards!-Rld
United Artists
"Mississippi Mermaid," a love s t o r y n
masked as a thriller is so much Truffaut's
that it is impossible not to be deeply fond
of it!"
-The New Yorker

I

old heidelb-11-775herg
211 N. Main, 663-7758

I

METRO-GOLOWYN-MAYER Presents A MARTIN RANSOHOF PROOUCTION
PATRICK McGOOHAN - RICHARD WIDMARK(
ALAN ALDA i,"THE MOONSHINE WAR"
co-stOrriftMEL0OM OHNSON WI GEER joewsLIAm
Screanplay By ELMOE LEONARD From His Noe- D kected By RICHARIOtU1NE
Produced ByMARTU'JRANSiOtKff P.cwvzrs ~ nwao.. .MLGM lk

I

T l Gf 9.fpWT1Ey
. e b -'..e+Mf S.cQ w

SHOWS AT:
1:15-3:45
6:10-8:45 P.M.

NOW
SHOWING!

3020 Washtenaw. Ph. 434-1782

NOW SHOWING
SHOW TIMES -
Mon., Tues., Thur., Fr.-7-9
Wed., Sat., Sun.-1 -3-5-7-9

i f _

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