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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-03
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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, July 3, 1970

Friday, July 3, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

For Direct Classilied Ad Service, Phonc 764-0557
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00 12 Noon Deadline

DiFgging in to

the ancien

FOR RENT

The Ann Arbor Fair Housing Ordi-
nance and the University of Mich-
igan Regents' bylaws prohibit dis-
crimination in housing. Questions
should be directed to Off-Campus
Housing, 764-7400.
ROOMS FOR RENT in old house, 5
blocks from campus, call 662-5456
persistently. 20039
BARGAIN!-$40. One man needed for
July-Aug. Arbor Forest Apts. 769-7248.
10C40
1 OR 2 MEN to complete 2-bedroom
apt. for fall. Air-cond., disp. $250 for
4, $225 for 3. Also 1 sublet July/Aug.
Call Elliott or Animesh, 668-8915 or
761-7435. 11037
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 5Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc.. 663-
6448. Socte
Summit
Associates
CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FALL
761-8055
49Ctc

FOR RENT
SINGLE ROOM. 428 Cross St. AA, $55,
663-3886. 21C431
FOR QUIET mature female, furn., a/c,
1 bdrm., apt., utilitarian, July 3-Aug.
rent negot. 769-1632 appt. only. 18038
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL REDUCED, attrac-
tive paneled small furn. first floor
room for man or woman, 21 or over.
house refrigerator. $10.50/wk. Lease
through Aug. 663-5666 or 971-6270.
19Ctc
911 S.Forest
Near Hill St.-Modern 2 Bdrm., 3-man.
668-6906. Fall. 14Ctc

BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED EDITOR
Skilled in organizing and
presenting special projects.
Write Mich. Daily Box 68 or
phone 971-6445.

USED CARS
'68 VW, 33,000 miles, radio, $1100. Kathy,
763-0286 or 278-1296. 5N39
'61 BUICK Le Sabre 4-dr. sedan, excel-
lent condition, one owner. $250/offer.
Call 769-0024. DN40

THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several selectj
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
loctc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
(2 bdrm. unit--summer %1, term)
Campus area, cool, furnished apart-
ments. I and 2 bdrm.-ample park-
ing, contact Resident Manager, Apt.
102, 721 S. Forest St. 16Ctc
Apartments
Limited
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENTS FOR FALL

J35
TYPING-Cheap and fast and profes-
sional. Call Candy, 665-4830. DJ48
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Ptc
EXPERIENCED SEC. desires typing in
her home or part time in your office.
Call 971-1533. 25J38
MULTIPLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 971-2446

1968 OPEL, deluxe sedan, 7400 miles,
Blaupunkt AM-FM, extra snow tires,
leaving country. 662-8788. 4N381
FOR SALE-1952 Pontiac OK car, $50.
WANTED-VW, Ford, Dodge etc. BUS;
VAN for camping with boys from
Child Care Center. 761-7779. 49N38
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS TO NYC or vicinity, TODAY!
A/C car; must be willing to share ex-
penses, possibly driving. Riders also
to points along Ohio, Pa., or N.J.
Tpks. CALL NOW-Andy at 764-0560.
Leave a message if I'm not there. I'm
leaving this afternoon. DG37
PLANE TICKET London-Detroit, Aug.
6. $90. 764-1400. 39G41
CALIFORNIA BOUND? Have 1970 air-

PERSONAL
C.K.A. "To write T'notes or not"-
that is the question. FD38
CANTERBURY HOUSE
presents
COMMANDER CODY
and his
LOST PLANET AIRMEN
"Shall we fiddle while Rome burns?"
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
330 Maynard St. $2.00
32F38
WANTED-Native speaker of Czech. to
practice with. 662-2352 eves. 26F38
RESEARCH SCIENTIST (Ph.D.), single,
air-cond. pad, seeks female conver-
sationalist over 21. Ask for Tom, 663-
3084. 29F39
HOUSECLEANING DONE 'or $1.25 hr.
Call 761-7452. Ask for Anita. 30F37
CHERYL-bring your paint brush with
you, LR. DF37

Geoffrey Bibby, LOOKING
FOR DHLUN, Alfred Knopf,
Inc., $10.00.
By HENRY WRIGHT
Many archaeologists today are
concerned with the explanation
of human history, not with its
rediscovery. Over a century of
systematic archaeological work
has resulted in a seemingly
complete historical framework
of inter-related cultures of
known ages t h r o u g h o u t the
world. Should one therefore in-
sist that archaeologists consider
exclusively questions of "why"
and "how" rather than "what"?
This volume shows that such
exclusiveness would be foolish.
Looking for Dilmun describes
the rediscovery of a lost civili-
zation whose existence was mere
conjecture only twenty years
ago. This civilization is critical
to the understanding of rela-
tions between early Mesopota-
mia and early India.
That the ancient Sumerians
had commercial relations with a
place called "Dilmun" has- long
been known. That Dilmun was
somehow connected with the
island of Bahrain in the Gulf
between Arabia and Iran was
suggested in 1880 by Sir Henry
Rawlinson, the British soldier-
scholar who was among the first
to translate the cuneiform writ-
ing of Mesopotamia. However,
Bahrain was seldom visited by
Westerners prior to oil develop-
ment and little archaeological
work was done. In 1953, the
Danish archaeologist P. V. Glob
and his British assistant Geof-
frey Bibby came searching for

lost Dilmun. They were struck
by the . fact that though there
were reports of over ten thous-
and burial mounds on the twen-
ty mile long island, there were
no reports of ruined cities or
towns. They walked over the en-
tire island before deciding to
excavate on two adjacent
mounds of debris near its north
end.
The smaller mound proved to
be the ruins of a temple con-
structed of stone blocks. Both
the architecture of the building
and the pottery within it were
unique. The only clue to the age
of the temple was a copper
bull's head found in a cache of
ritual paraphernalia. This re-,
sembles a 'head from the Royal
Tombs of Ur in Mesopotamia
dated to about 2400 B.C. This
temple raised more questions
than it answered. The larger
mound was capped by a six-
teenth century A.D. Portugese
fortress and a ruined Islamic
town. There was little evidence
of what lay below these relative-
ly recent ruins, but the mound
was the largest in the area, and
a likely candidate for an earlier
city site.
The complicated business of
working on an urban site and
day-to-day life in an archaeolo-
gical camp are well described -by
Bibby. As season followed sea-
son, the Danish team found be-
low the Islamic layers the ruins
of a Hellenistic city of the third
century B.C. Below this were
evidences of occupation during
the ninth century B.C. when the
kings of Assyria were ravaging
nearby southern Mesopotamia
and of the fifteenth century B.C.

when the Kassite Dynasty gave
Mesopotamia one of its largest
periods of relative peace. Near
the very bottom of the mound
were the ruins of successive
well-preserved cities of the per-
iod of the enigmatic temple.
Gradually a picture of daily life
in these cities was put together.
A street with well-built dwell-
ings was cleared. A substantial
city wall with gateway was near-
by. This gateway may have
been where goods entering or
leaving the city were inspected
or taxed.
Around it was a concentration

sbooksL

by the bull's head from the tem-
ple. The seals further indicate
that the early Bahrain civiliza-
tion was a mediator of commer-
cial contacts between the giant
urban states of the two river
valleys.
The good reputation of the
Danes led to their working in
many of the small sheikhdoms
on the Arabian mainland, While
scholars from a large imperial
nation are automatically sus-
pect, those from a small nation
are less go. The Danes helped in
the creation of local government
archaeological laws and organ-

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cond. Buick Electra. Will pay gas if FREE U CRAFTS FAIR-sell, display,
you drive car to be in San Francisco trade. July 17 and 18. On the Dig.
Aug. 1. Car avail. July 22. Call 483- Leaves of Grass. 763-2130. 27F43
8430, ext. 324. 38039
- RUMMAGE SALE Sunday, July 5: sew-
MUSICAL MDSE., ing notions, trim, patterns, material,
RADIOS, REPAIRS 1950 Singer sewing machine, clothing,
carpets, mattresses, etc. 305 Maple
NEW AND USED JAZZ: Ridge, 761-9861. 28F38
P aulazzup WEEKLY OR WEEKEND ENCOUNTER
Monday night-Canterbury House GROUPS. Emotional re-education &
8-10 p.m. 50c
X38 interpersonal awareness. 663-7616.
16F44
RADIO, TV. Hi-Fl repair. House calls--. . ._
Very ndEngaemn
Veyreasonable! Very cheap! 769- FOhAE imodEggemen
6250. DX42 Ring. EDUCATION at its best. Austin
Diamond, 1209 S. University, 663-7151.
STEREO SYSTEM - Garard 50 turn- Ftc
table, XAM 25 watt amp, 2 double-
XAM speakers, 4 mo. old SONY tuner, OAKLAND AND HILL. Large 1 bdrm.
25 records; $200/offer. Call 769-0024. apt. 761-6074, 1-785-0743. 48U40
DX4C
X - IT'S PICNIC SEASON!
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Instruments and accessories, new and And no picnic is complete without
used. Lessons, repairs. 209 State. potato salad. On your next picnic
665-8001. 10 a m.-7 p m. X take along a quart of our original
recipe German potato salad for only
HELP WANTED $1.20. Call NO 2-0737
BABYSITTING, student parents need OLD GERMAN
sitter for 1 smily, happy baby. Ideal RESTAYRANT
summer job, for young girl, own
trans. Phone 663-4458 after 6. 49H42 120 W. WASHINGTON
24F4C

of stone measuring weights and
stamp seals. Each button-like
stone seal had a distinctive car-
ved design which could be im-
pressed into a lump of clay plas-
tered over a jar neck or wrap-
per around the knot in a bale
of dry goods. Subsequent illegal
tampering with the goods would
require breaking the clay lump.
These seals proved especially
important. They are exactly like
a rare seal type found in both
Mesopotgmia, 450 miles to the
northwest, and in the Indus Val-
ley 1100 miles to the east. In
both r'egions, thesehsealstoccur
in layers of 2500 to 2000 B.C.,
confirming the date suggested

izatiorls. Their reconnaissances
revealed surface traces of un-
suspected dead communities.
Excavations were conducted on
several new sites.
Among many intriguing dis-
coveries are a yet earlier cul-
ture best represented at a sea-
side village and cemetery in Abu
Dhabi, 300 miles to the east and
much closer to the Indus Val-
ley. The little village of stone
houses set on a tiny island a
few hundred feet off the Arab-
ian coast was inhabited by peo-
ple who kept a few sheep, goats
and cows and hunted gazelles,
camels and dugongs, or sea

EDINBURGH APTS., 912 Brown St. The
Royal Dutch Apts., 715 Church. The
King's inn Apts., 1939 Dewey. Taking
applications for fall rental for all 3
locatios-;.or rental information call
761-6156 or 761-3466. 4041
CAMPUS
NEW FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAH LMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
38Ctc
711 ARCH-Near State and Packard-
Mlodern 2-bdrm. apts. for Fall. Dish-
waher, balcony. air-cond., and much
more. Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Ctc
AVAIL. FOR SUMMEl & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. 11Ctc
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEV IS?
VISIT
US

663-0511
761 -5440

5oCtcI

2 BDRM, furn. apt. $210 for 3 persons,
includes utilities, parking. 761-2939.
9Ctc
GIRL-Room w/kitchen privilegts. $40/
summer, $55/fall. HU 5-1586. 12C38
1 AND 2 BDRM. furn. units for fall, 1
bdrm. $155 and $160. 2 bdrm. from
$210 for 2, from $225 for 3. Call 663-
1761. 15044
FURN. APT. for rent 'til Aug. 20. 2250
Fuller Rd. 663-9576 eves. 16C45
BDRM. in 7 bdrm. house, back yard,
kitchen facilities, campus. 663-8609.
/ 17C3Mi
SUMMER SUBLET
FOURTH GIRL NEEDED for modern
apt. 769-7753. 50U41
SUBLET - Girl needed formodern
A/C 4-man apt. CHEAP. 761-7452,
1U37
LOVELY APT. for single woman or
married couple. Walking distance
from campus. July-Aug. Call 665-8051.
42U38
JULY-AUG. SUBLET - 1 bdrm, furn.
apt. in groovy house; campus and
hospital. 769-1064. 43U40
2 GIRLS to sublet modern apt. $35.
Call 663-7744 or 665-9616. 44U39
1 GIRL'NEEDED to sub-lease huge 2-
story apt. $40. 769-2404. 45U39

EXPERIENCED editor with six years
university teaching, M.A. plus Ph.D.
hours in literature, desires free-lance
editing, writing. 662-0348 evenings.
DJ40
PHOTO SUPPLIES
AT CENTURY
The Best in
Good Used Cameras
WE BUY, SELL, TRADE
Everything Photographic
DARKROOM SUPPLIES
LUMINOUS PAPER
Repairs on all makes
Century Camera
(At our new location)
4254 N. Woodward, Royal Oak
Between 13 and 14 Mile Rd.
LI 9-6355
'l'ake I-94 to Southfield Expr. North to
13 Mile Road-then East to
Woodward and North
(Michigan Bank, Security and Diner
Charges accepted)
1Dt
FOR SALE
SELL YOURSELF
on Daily classifieds
764-0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557

'pscratch ings into the distantA

STUDENTS in mech. engin. needed
for psych, exp. 3testing sessions tak-
ing approx. 2 hrs. total time; you
will be paid $2.50/hr. David Shapiro,
429-2531 days, or 663-9769 eves, to
arrange appt. 47H37
BABYSITTER A.M. WEEKDAYS, start
July 6. Call 761-5249. 48H37
WANTED--Once a wk. help w/house-
cleaning. $1.75'hr. Call 764-7452 cr
eves. 971-8611. 4637
MISCELLANEOUS
LEAVING COUNTRY-Must sell entire
Great Books set; 4 mos. old, worth
$850 for $450. Call 769-0024. DM8
ROOMMATES WANTED
PROFESSIONAL-GRAD needs room-
mate for July-August, own bdrm.,
pool, near hospital, call Ron, 662-
1058 or 761-8270 (days). 9Y38
WOMAN GRAD wanted to share really
nice apt. Own room. Rent negot. 764-
0510 mornings, or 662-0348 evenings.
DY40
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
'68 OSSA $75, needs some work. Call
769-7269. DZ48
'67 HONDA CB 160 with cover, extra
back tire, helmet, $275. Call Steve
Mooney, 763-3117 or 769-1844. 18241
'70 TRIUMPH TR-6 650cc-Excellent
condition. Must sell. 1200 miles. Be-
fore you buy anything else check this
one out. 769-7528, call before 5. 20238
PERSONAL
JACKIE-WELCOME BACK TO AA.
FD38
UNION BARBERSHOP OPEN
MON-FRI THIS WEEK
31F38

PAINTING - Student desires painting
jobs, inside and outside. Four years
experience. Call 662-4736. FD
UPTIGHT? h nget rightuat WILD
FLOWER-the unique boutique, 516
E. WILLIAM (above the bike shop).
23F3E
DO YOU hate to type? Call Candy at
665-4830. She's fast and accurate and
cheap, cheap cheap! DF48
THE DAY that Ding Dong Bell. Never
Wright and Bedtime Storey get to-
gether the Bird of Paradise will zap
he Daily. DF38

-THE BLURB-
is back in town.

DF3E

A closet without something from the
WILD FLOWER is just a bunch of
clothes-WILD FLOWER-the unique
boutique, 516 E. WILLIAM (above the
bike shop). 22F38
FLY YOUR FLAG!! WE'RE FREE!!
LEAVING Ann Arbor for the Fourth or
anytime? Why not take some AA
Blues posters with you. Call 763-1134
or stop by the festival office-2nd
floor Mich. Union. 21F37
PERSONS witnessing accident in Food
and Drug parking lot, Stadium and
Packard, Thurs., June 18, 5:30 p.m.,
gold Mustang and Mercury, please call
971-5446, 25F40
NOTICE TO MICHIGAN DAILY BOX
HOLDERS, MAIL IS IN THE FOL-
LOWING BOXES: 50, 123, 30, 5. FD
THE ONLY place in Ann Arbor to buy
her diamond engagement ring.
CHECK IT.
AUSTIN DIAMOND
1209 S. University 663-715 1
F

SUMMER RENTALS
Choice Apts. at low rates. Ann
Trust Co. Phone 769-2800.

Arbor
22C83

BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims
Button-Fly
Troditionol
Bells .....

FOR
- 6.. 50
.. .6.50
.. .6.98
.. 7.50

OWN ROOM for Girl. A/C, mod. apt.
July-Aug., cheap! 761-0563. 47U40
4TH MAN NEEDED, for modern luxury
apt. near caipus and med. center.
A/C, dishwasher, July-Aug. only. Will
bargain for rates. Call Bob or Frank,
665-7501. DU40
FURNISHED EFFICIENCY near cam-
pus, July 1-Aug. 26. 80/mo. Call 665-
0053 after 5:00 p.m. 49U40
SUMMER SUBLETS
761-8055
14Utc
CHEAP-July-Aug. sublet, A/C, 4-man
apt. $50/mo. 761-7452. 2U42
WANTED TO RENT
WANT TO RENT parking space fall-
winter near East Quad, if you are not
using your's write Bill Jacobs, 61-55
98th St., Rego Park, N.Y. 11374. 15L29
GAY GRAD, male, needs clean, quiet,
cheap, private room. Call 761-7275
until 11:00 p.m. L35
SINGLE APT., normal facilities, for
July-Aug., preferably near campus.
Please reply Box 378, Mich. Daily.
DLtc
PETS AND SUPPLIES
HEALTHY lovable kitten, female, needs
home badly, otherwise must go to
animal shelter. 665-0777 after 5. 12T39

RUMMAGE SALE Monday, July5 sew-
ing notions, trim, patterns, material,
1950 Singer sewing machine, clothing,
carpets,7mattresses, etc. 305 Maple
Ridge, 761-9861, 8B38
DIVING GEAR
All major brands at discount prices,
Ann Arbor Diver's Co., call Mike Wills.
665-6032 persistently noons or after 5
best, 711 Arch, No. 301. 7B45
GET THE DRUM set used by the Byrds'
and Commander Cody's drummers!
Ludwig Drums. Full set. Zildian cym-
bals. Reasonable. Call 761-2704 any-
time. DB4
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-1 pair prescription glasses in
Law Quad parking lot Saturday
morning. 665-4061. DA38
FOUND-Siamese female cat. No collar.
Hill and Packard vicinity. Call 668-
8819 anytime. DA38
REWARD: lost blue point siamese cat,
Main-Hoover-Stadium area, please call
769-6045. 13A40
WALLET STOLEN from library refer-
ence room, Wed. Please return pa-
pers, no ques. 662-9613. 12A39
BICYCLE FOUND, men's lightweight.
Eng. bike. 761-1736 to identify, ask for
Terry or Judy. DA38
FOUND by Harvard Valiance-Medium
size pair of glasses for slightly near-
sighted person. B ro0wn, squarish
shaped. Found before end of spring]
half. Contact M. Hirsch at Daily any
time to claim. DA40

BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS .........2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's . . . 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's ......... 6.98
Nuvo's... ... . 8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam's Store
122 E. Washington

Sidney Bernard, THIS WAY
TO THE APOCALYPSE, The
Smith Press, $5.95.
By ROBERT CONROW
Opening S i d n e y Bernard's
Apocalypse is very much like
unwrapping last year's Christ-
mas fruitcake. Although the bits
of cherry, green mint, and as-
sorted nuts remain, much of the
flavor will have been lost to the
passing year. And so it is with
Bernard's Apocalypse, a chron-
icle of the sixties, neatly pack-
aged for the seventies, yet filled
with cherries, mints, and assort-
ed nuts from the years' past.
A majority of the more than
75 essays contained in the col-
lection originally appeared in
such diverse publications as
Cheetah, The Morningsider, and
the New York Herald Tribune
Magazine, and w e re scattered
throughout the decade begin-
ning in 1961 and lasting through
1969. One envisions Bernard
himself as a°'sort of David Sus-
kind of the underground, wan-
dering from protest to love-fest
while always peering through
granny glasses which focus only
on those elements generally fil-
tered out by the "establishment"
media.
This technique, while engag-
ing, tends to grow a bit tedious
as, for example, when Bernard
devotes himself to a "Short
American Hiptionary." Terms
defined include the "Be-In"
which "invariably attracts suit-
shirt-and-tie people who always
ask, 'What is going on?"' And
if they have to ask Bernard,
"they are in the wrong part of
the park." Or "Hippie," which
is defined as a person who must
move fast to get where the ac-
tion is. Heis, in Bernard's lingo,
"a person with a well-exercised
pair of hips."
When Bernard resorts-to such
didacticism, he seems only to
be betraying his own case of"
what must, in all honesty, be
seen as an acute case of gener-
ation gap. He is after all, as an
introductory note points out,
"now 50, maybe secret year two
over under." This, in itself,
should not be held against, him,
but in trying to relate via the

printed page the goings-on of
what surely must now be seen
as the most "audio-visual" of all
generations, he is virtually up
against the ivy walls.
It may, perhaps, only be con-
sidered unfortunate that Ber-
nard and others of his ilk have
failed to gain the same insight
as Tuli Kupferberg (also some-
what aged at 42) of the Fugs.
In his essay on "The Fugs vs
Coca Cola," Bernard quotes the
hip-easy Kupferberg as describ-
ing the impetus behind the Fugs.
"In a way," notes Kupferberg,
"we thought of ourselves as a
leap off the printed page and
off the daily headline. It is a
pragmatic case of being able to
reach the kids ... who are not
in touch with parents, college
dons, government leaders and
paper intellectuals." And here it
seems again revealing to note
that Bernard, in describing Lead
Fug, Ed Sander's publication,
feels the necessity of resorting
to the genteel terminology of "a
highly entertaining little maga-
zine whose title is a four-letter
word followed by the word You."
The one exception to this in-
hibition is evidenced during the
author's all-too-infrequent fo-
rays into the grown-up world of
national politics. Here the tiger
in Bernard emerges unleashed
and fully-blown.
A choice bit of investigative
reporting may be seen in Ber-
nard's essay on "The Authen-
ticity of FDR's Secret Testa-
ment." Here the Kandy-Kolored
Tom Wolfe journalese gives way
to hard-hitting Clark Mollen-
hoff factualism.
The spine of Bernard's article
Today's Writers ...
Henry Wright is Curator of
Archaeology at the Museum of
Anthropology and is Assistant
Professor of Anthropology at
the University. Robert Conrow,
a doctoral candidate in Ameri-
can Studies, is spending the
summer writing his thesis and
walking his dog Kubla. A grad-
uate student in Business Ad-
ministration, Ron Brasch writes
poetry and last year edited
Generation.

rests on a few prophetic words
penned by President Roosevelt
while he planned his grand de-
sign for postwar coexistence just
weeks before his fatal illness.
As his source, Bernard relies
heavily on a now out-of-print
volume of FDR Braintruster,
J. J. Kissenden. In it, according
to Bernard, it is made clear that
Roosevelt was increasingly
plagued by a group of war
hawks led by Vice President
T r u m a n and Representative
Lyndon B. Johnson.
There can be no doubt, ac-
cording to Bernard, that Roose-
velt's "secret document" attests
to the President's belief that
Johnson would have no hesita-
tions about bypassing Congress,
or indeed public opinipn, in his

weakness for military solutions.
Roosevelt therefore spelled out
his fears, according to Bernard,
by saying that "Where careful
diplomacy is called for, you can
depend on Lyndon to opt for
careless militarism."
The reason this document was
never picked up by the major
press, in spite of audible whis-
pers in Washington circles, lies
in the realm of what, for want
of a better term, must be called
"professional -ethics." Bernard
quotes a UPI "informant" as
saying that newsmen "have long
felt it was not in their province
to break the story; that the
testament was, in a true sense a
family document. And that FDR
Jr., who is believed to have
possession, alone had the option
to run with it or suppress it-

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Poetry of renewed

TV10 per month
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Saint Geraud, THE NAOMI
POEMS: CORPSE AND
BEANS, Big Table Publishing
Co., $2.45.
By RON BRASCH
Saint Geraud writes magnifi-
cent war poems. It doesn't mat-
ter whether they're concerned
with death by solitude, unrequ-
ited lover, or the Vietnam blood-
letting that makes shadows of
us all. Each is a war poem.
The foreward of The Naomi
Poems: Corpse and Beans re-
veals "Saint Geraud" to be a
Jesuit gone-bad from an eight-
eenth cen t u ry pornographic
French novel, The Triumph of,
Vice. Considering Oeraud's rev-
erence for perversion, the pseu-
donym is more than slightly
strange. No saints, dirty-mind-
ed, fictitious or otherwise, live
here. Only Bill Knott. And
Knott burns for himself and all
of us like summer foxfire across
a national forest:
... Iwrite these lines to
cripple the dead,
to come up halt before the
living:
I am one man, I run my hand.
over
your body, I touch the secret
vibes
of the earth, I breathe your

heartbeat, Naomi, and always
I am one man alone at
night..
Although Namoi appears in
relatively few poems, her face
and body exist everywhere. "Last
Poem" and "After the Burial"
refer to Naomi's recent death;
as to the relationship in life,
we can only speculate.
In late 1966, a mimeographed
letter circulated among poets
and critics. The letter, allegedly
written by a friend of the poet,
stated that at 26, Bill Knott had
killedi himself in a Chicago
tenament on North Clark Street.
The reasons : he was an orphan
and a virgin and couldn't endure
any longer without being loved
by somebody.
Too easily we can theorize the
suicide letter to be symbolic,
dismissing it as a grandiose ges-
ture, rather than considering
the desperate depths that Knott
has experienced. Through these
pastoral, confessional lyrics of
"sleep, death, desire," many only
two or three lines in length,
Knott is committing suicide be-
fore our eyes.
The beach holds and sifts us
through her dreaming
fingers
Summer fragrances green
between your legs

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