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Michigan Daily, 1970-06-24
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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, June 24 1970

Wednesday, June 24, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

For Direct Classilied Ad Service, Phoue 764-0557
12Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00 12 Noon Deadline

The

lonely crowd

InI

the Set

A Feature Review by James V. Romano

FOR RENT
The Ann Arbor Fair Housing Ordi-
nance and the University of Mich-
igan Regents' bylaws prohibit dis-
crimination in housing. Questions
should be directed to Off-Campus
Housing. 764-7400.
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 5oCtc
ON CAMPUS, singles for male grad
students or teaching fellows, clean,
very quiet, linens, no cooking. 723
Packard near State. 5035
AIR-CONDITIONED 1 BDRM. APTS.
Avail. Now. 761-2680
UNIVERSITY TOWERS
536 S, Forest

EAST University at Hill St-
Apt., $100. July L. 769-7346.

7035
BDRM.
2035

Summit 2
Associates12
CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FALL
761-8055
49C tcE
EDINBURGH APTS., 912 Brown St. The
Royval Dutch Apts., 715 Church. The
King;'s Inn Apts..1939 Dewey. Taking B
applications for fall rental for all 3
locations. For rental information call
761-6156 or 761-3466. 4041
2 AND 3 BDRM, TOWNHOUSES, $130-
150 per month, initial deposit $390, 7
chilren and pets welcome. Arbor Park,
located off Ellsworth Rd., west of
Piatt. Taking applications for near
future occupancy. Manageimnnt office-
2990 S. State, 761-9026. 20035a
DYNAMITE MODERN 2-man apartment.
1 block from campus. July-Aug. Must
lease $100/mo Call 769-6246 after 6
M n49033

FOR RENT
BEDROOM furnished, quiet, close to
campus, parking. Mgr. 101-202. July-
Aug. $150/mo.-Fall 4-man, $290. 927
S. Forest, after 5 p.m. 802-6156. 035
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
(2 bdrm. unit-summer ' term)
ampus area, cool, furnished apart-
ments. 1 and 2 bdrm.-ample park-
ing, contact Resident Manager, Apt.
102, 721 S. Forest St. 16Ctc
Campus-Hospita
Fa II Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
BDRM. furn, apt. $210 for 3 persons,
includes utilities, parking. 761-2939.
9Ctc
BDRM. TOWNHOUSES, $139 per mo.,
initial deposit $400. Children and pets
welcome. Arbor Manor, located on
2nd Ave., south of Michigan Ave.,
near Monroe, in Ypsi. Taking applica-
tions for near future occupancy.
Management office 2990 S. State, 761-
9026. 19035
AVAIL. FOR SUMMErt & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
eautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. l Ctc
11 ARCH-Near State and Packard-
Modern 2-bdrm. apts, for Fall. Dish-
washer, balcony, air-cond., and much
more. Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Ctc
CAMPUS
NEW FURNISHED APARTMENT
FOR SUMMER OR FALL
at 543 CHURCH ST,
APT. 16
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
380tc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus.
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc, 663-
6448. l5Ct c
Apartments
Limited
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENTS FOR FALL

FOR RENTw
911 S. Forest
Near Hill St.-Modern 2 Bdrm., 3-man.
668-6906. Fall. 14Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
1 BDRM, unfurnished and furnished
units, swimming pool and party room,
away from campus. McKinley Assoc.,
683-6448. 3035
GARAGE, 723 Packard. 6035
BUSINESS SERVICES
WILL DO SEWING, mending, and al-
terations--Cheap. Call 663-2011. 24J35
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
EXPERIENCED EDITOR
Skilled in organizing and
presenting special projects.
Write Mich. Daily Box 68 or
phone 971-6445.
J35
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291. 42Jtc
NOW ON CAMPUS

HELP WANTED
EARN $25 by donating cerebrospinalt
fluid. Need 21-40 yr. old males-fe-
males. 764-0298. 25H35
WANTED-Once a wk. help w/house-
cleaning. $1.75/hr. Call 764-7452 cr
eves. 971-8611. 46H37
EARN ABOVE average incomes selling
new line of home care products, flex-:
ible hours, 10-15 hrs./wk., scholarships
avail. Call 769-1348. 44H35
WANTED-Experienced sailor with 21
man crew to sail 28 foot sloop back
from Boston, all expenses paid.4Call
789-6637. 451135
BABYSITTER - WANTED, room and
board, $20/wk. salary, in country.
Call after 7 p.m., 461-1008. 43H35
FOR SALE
GIRL'S used English bike, exc. cond.
Call early, late, 769-5482. 6B35
USED FURN. Couch, bed, dining room
table, armchair, vanity. 663-6151. B35
NEW RECORDS for sale-Rock, pop,
some classical. These are mostly un-
played promo copies. Proceeds to
ACLU. Come to 916 Oakland, Tuesday
and Wednesday morning ONLY. DB35
WOLLENSAK 150055 tape recorder, ex-
cel. cond., best offer. 769-0698. 4B35
12x60 STAR MOBILE HOME, 1 yr. old,
furn. Call 483-1297. 1835
SUNFISH sailboat, $400. Fine Flamingo
guitar, $160. 665-3330. 2B32
TICKETS --
2 ROUND TRIP tickets London/De-
troit, June 26-Aug. 25, cheap. Call
769-1371. Q35
CHEAP-2 return tickets, LONDON TO
DETROIT, Aug. 6. 665-9468. 20Q35
LONDON-DETROIT AUG. 30, $80. Call
Jerry, 665-0150 or 663-4183. 19Q35

TRANSPORTATION
GIRL'NEEDS ride to Calif. Leave 26th
or after, share driving--expenses. Cali
late, early, 769-5482. 35G35
WANTED-Rider to Des Moines Thurs.
475-2541 eves. 36035
RIDERS WANTED to California, leaving
end June, sharing driving, expenses.
Call John after.3, 761-9593. 37035
CALIFORNIA BOUND? Have 1970 air-
cond. Buick Electra. Will pay gas if
you drive car to be in San Francisco
-Aug. 1. Car avail. July 22. Call 483-
8430, ext. 324. 38039
INDIA Overland. $204, regular trips. 39
Landsdowne Gardens, London, S.W. 8,
U.K. 50
SHARE rented VAN to N.Y.C. area.
Riders too. Lv. June 25 or 26. 769-
4591, Bob. 33035
FOR SALE-Round trip ticket to Eur.,
Windsor to London, June 26-Aug. 6,
very inexpensive, avail, immediately.
Call anytime (preferably after 4), 761-
2240. 30G35
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Beautiful blue-eyed kitten, tan
w/white chest and paws, June412,
Geddes and Walnut. 761-3855. 4A35
LOST-Gold watch, Diag area, engraved
"Elizabeth." 662-5754, Elizabeth. 11A35
LOST-Siamese cat, answers to Mean-
der, vie. Prospect-Church St. area.
761-4263, anytime. Reward. 9A35
PETS AND SUPPLIES
HEALTHY lovable kitten, female, needs
home badly, otherwise must go to
animal shelter. 665-0777 after 5. 12T39
FREE PUPPIES, cute and frisky. Call
665-2111 after 4 p.m. 11T35
ADOPTABLE, ADORABLE kittens, 2
months old, housebroken. Call 662-
8603 or 665-8375. 10T35

Philip Slater. THE PURSUIT
OF LONELINESS: AMERICAN
CULTURE AT THE BREAK-
ING POINT.Heacon Press, I97A
$7.50.
Ah, love, let us be true
To one another I for the world,
which seems
To lie before us like a land of
dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so
new,
Hath really neither joy, nor
love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor
help for pain;
And we are here as on a dark-
ling plain
Swept with confused alarms
of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash
by night.
-Matthew Arnold
The human figures of the late
sculptor Alberto Giacometti are
dark and brittle images of lone-
liness. Invariably thin, nude,
silent, they stand ravaged by
some tricks of the rational and
the absurd. For Sartre, they are
moulded expressions of existen-
tialism, itself, reflecting man's
encounter with the void. But
time and media coalescent, Gia-
cometti's shapes stand on Dover
Beach, as Arnold's spiritual un-
rest comes into matchstick
being. Only ludid, pleasing verse

---u

BARGAIN CORNER

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VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims 6.50
Button-Fly . 6.50
Traditional ......6.98
Bells ............7.50

TYPING
PRINTING
THESIS SERVICE
Fast, Dependable, Low-Priced
214 Nickels Arcade 662-4222
Summer hours: 10-4 Mon.-Fri,
3Jtc
MULTI P LE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 971-2446
Jtc
WANTED TO RENT-
ONE BEDROOM in house for couple.
Call Leigh, 761-9368 after 5 or week-
ends. 12L35
GAY GRAD, male, needs clean, quiet,
cheap, private room. Call 761-7275
until 11:00 p.m. L35
SINGLE APT., normal facilities, for
July-Aug., preferably near campus.
Please reply Box 378, Mich. Daily,
DLtc
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED-1 girl's and 1 boy's bicycle.
Call 761-2680 and leave message for
Ellen, Apt. 17F and I'll call you back.
g 13K35

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tionalism ironically belying the
strong intelligence earlier shown.
Presumably, the god Dionysus,
has possessed Roszak, who like
Teiresias, sage and seer, has
dressed himself in fawn-skins
and climbed the mountain.
Teiresias may have been looking
for a new job with a new relig-
ion, but Roszak's Bacchic shouts
seem unfortunately to decry ed-
ucation and responsibility.
Just as disgusted by the war
and intimidated by technocracy,
Berger, on the other hand, is
hopelessly conservative a n d
skeptical of change. His instruc-
tion is as distressing as Roszak's
maenadic impulses: "Accept
alienation' - it is the price of
freedom. Learn how to stand
apart." This is consistent with
Berger's sociological perspective
(see Invitation to Sociology
wherein he recommends "ec-
stasy" - the act of standing
outside societal roles), but will
hardly change the dehumanized
society he laments. Berger's pro-
gram, put as blatant imperative,
and Roszak's, more abstrusely
aimed at magical self-expres-
sion, both stress concepts of
individualism. Individualism, in
its many forms, Slater attacks
as the corruptive element in the
American character.
Slater's sociology is clearly
oriented to group studies. His
first book, Microcosm, is a tech-
nical examination of -various
group, modes - structural, psy-
chological and religious. The
emphasis placed by Slater on
interpersonal relationships may
color somewhat the defining
principles and sympathies found
in The Pursuit of Loneliness
To the credit of his wisdom and
clarity, however, Slater here
avoids as much professional jar-
gon and gamesmanship as pos-
sible.
Also seminal to his present
thesis is-The Glory of Hera, an
analysis of the relations be-
tween ancient Greek myth-
ology and Greek family life. The
book in itself'makes a worthy
contribution to the either prig-
gishly deadening or idealizing
bibliography that precedes it,
though, no doubt, many dyed-
in-the-wool classicists will raise
their eyebrows with scorn, pri-
marily because Slater is a so-
ciologist, a "foreigner." Yet,
herein lies its value; it is an en-
viable achievement ofbscholar-
ship, broad and robust and
functional.
More to the point, a basic pre-
mise of The Glory of Hera is
that the Greek male was "high-
ly oedipal" and strongly nar-
cissistic, consequent upon ambi-
valent and de-sexualizing moth-
er-son relationships. Lest this
seem clinical classicism run
amuck, Slater offers proof with
numerous examples of myth-
ology, art and literature. His
analogies with American cul-
ture do not hold exactly the
same familiar and sexual pat-
terns. Nonetheless, the differ-
ences are considered only quan-
titative. "Buried beneath every
Western man is a Greek-West-
ern man is nothing but Alci-
biades with a bad conscience,
disguised as a plumber. . . . The
need to suprass others, to ag-
grandize oneself, to prove one's
worth and manhood are just the
same. . . . The motivational
basis of our own soceity is sim-
ply an advanced stage of the
same disease that dominated
Greek life." This study then is
no mere homage to the classical
tradition but is dependent upon
it for aid to Slater's conceptual-
ization of modern society. Such
uncommon perspective brings
another sound feature to The
Pursuit of Loneliness, really an
extension of his previous work.
In Slater's new book, the vic-
tim of that advanced disease is
the middle-class American, who
appears hard and mor'orse, con-

trary to the TV image of "smi-
ling faces with chronically open
mouths." Slater's purpose is to
examine reality and fantasy,
thereby to understand what peo-

pIe do to themselves and each
other.-
Human interdependence, as
opposed to competitive individ-
ualism, is the natural reality
most suppressed. "An enormous
technology seems to have set it-
self the task of making it un-
necessary for one human being
to ever ask anything of another
in the course of going about
his daily business." Essentially,
technology "frees" us from in-
terpersonal relationships other
than those which mean profit-
able contacts. The more "free"
we become, however, the more
lonely we live. We feel the need
for Privacy; we mass ourselves
into suburbia looking for it. It
is not enough that there we al-
low ourselves illusions of peace-
ful solitude and suave non-con-
sformity, because there too, un-
happy, we organize "happy
hours"' or block parties, so that
we may get acquainted with the
neighbors and look into each
other's empty faces. Somehow
it doesn't work; it's synthetic
you can taste the plastic.
The desire for community,
meaning collective trust and co-
operation, is one severely frus-
trated in this country. Slater
describes two others: the desire
for engagement and the desire
for dependence. Regarding the
former, he writes:
"...the most future-orient-
ed nation in the world shows
a deep- incapacity to plan
ahead. We are, as a people,
perturbed by our inability to
anticipate the consequences of
our acts, but we still wait op-
timistically for some magic
telegram informing us that
the tangled skein of misery
and self-deception into which
we have woven ourselves has
vanished in the night. . . .
Whatever realism we may dis-
play in technical areas, our
approach to social issues in-
evitably falls back on cinema-
tic tradition, in which social
problems are resolved by gest-
ure."
This is criticism of our in-
ability to engage directly with
social problems and of our
makeshift solutions, and gives
rise to his definition of the

emotions and to teach principles
of adult morality. The stifled
parent suffers, but not as much
as-the child. When adolescent,
he cannot laugh above his own
self-righteousness and stern
moralistic behavior. Deprived of
emotive parental direction and
support, the young are lost and
show dull emotions themselves.
Ironically, their song is: "All
you need is love . . ."
Frustrations were spent at
Woodstock. What happened af-
ter the rains came was never
expected and defied explana-
tion. The "older generation" ac-
tually succoured all those wet
and starving "hippies" who re-
turned thanks. Instincts of mu-
tual need and dependence were
allowed finally to breathe, as
disaster gave the opportunity to

l

remains shining in
imagined scene.

Ismsbo(

such an

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Nuvo's . . ........ 8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
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122 E. Washington

5oCtcI

2-3 BDRM. TOWNHOUSES, $126-154 per
mo., initial deposit $360-420. Children
and pets welcome. Danbury Green,
located on McArthur Blvd., north of
Clark Road, Ypsi. Taking applications
for near future occupancy. Manage-
mnent office 2990 S. State, 761-9026.
18035

I

I

CAN YOU DEFEND

FACULTY
and
family
SECRETARIES
STAFF
STUDENTS

JRSELF?0
MICH. SELF-DEFENSE
ACADEMY, INC.
212 W. HURON
1 block post Main
769-2978
23 hr. onswerin service

*f

Before comment on The Pur-.
suit of Loneliness, some general
remarks are due. The alienation
of man, aggravated by bureau-
cracy and technology, has be-
come a theme no longer in the
exclusive realm of the arts and
philosophy, but now fully con-
ceived in political, social and
cultural terms. Modern Amer-
ican literature is markedly so-
ciological, whether in the form
of scholarly treatises or that of
Mailer; Vidal, and Philip Roth.
Of this genre, there are respon-
sible and vibrant- works, some
compensation for the patently
sterile titles that make up best-
seller lists. Much, too, is noth-
ing more than glib, fast-buck
idealization. Made more acute
by war, social ills have caused
extensive examinations of value
systems with prescriptions that
mean, in effect, cultural refor-
mation. When new ideas, how-
ever, take the place of change
itself, or abandon common
sense if not reason, or sadly miss
even a shade of optimism, they
become most disturbing.
Brief mention of two books
will serve as final prelude to
Professor Slater. They are ex-
amples of current thought, sen-
sitive, mutually corroborative
and alike in many instances,
yet, offer different solutions to
the problems of mass society:
Theodore Rosz k's The Making
of a Counter Culture and Move-
wnent and Revolution by Peter~
Berger and Richard Neuhaus
(both Anchor Books, 1969, -70).
Roszak writes a clear anal-
ysis of generational antagonism,
which he follows with an un-
convincing espousal of a sham-
anistic world view and anti-ra-

*4

parents to act as parents and to
children to. act as children.
Having thwarted certain hu-
man needs, we have made in-
dividualism a goal. But tech-
nology, to which we sacrifice,
cheats us even of being valu-
able individuals. Witness Cap-
tain Lovell of the unlucky Apol-
lo -13 who stated emphatically
at a press conference that his
ship's successful return depend-
ed not on any individual, since
- "You can snap any crew in."
The horrible extent to which we
have become dehumanized, how-
ever, is reflected in our atti-
tudes toward war and violence.
Slater's second chapter is en-
titled: "Kill anything t h a t
moves."
Pondering the insanity of our
involvement in Indochina,-the
slaughter, the hypocrisies, the
lies, the insolence of office, ev-
en those in ivory towers, where
televisions have been installed,
cannot remain unshaken. Slat-
er, not surprisingly, g i v e s
thoughtful analysis of this in-
volvement. He finds t h a t
though we claim to stress the
value of human life, we have
transferred killing from a means
to an end (i. e. genocide; the
body count" is important), in
fact, we overkill. This discovery
is not new, nor are the reasons
of prejudice and technological
showmanship. In addition, Slat-
er suggests that our preference
for "violence at a distance" is
essentially vengeance against
our self-imposed technocracy;
that is, we inflict upon alien and
mysterious "enemies" mechan-
isms that oppress us inscrutably.
Instead of attacking the ma-
chine directly, trying to wrest
control over our own environ-
ment, we take it out on some-
one else, with not so shining
panoply. This assumption, how-
ever true, is too simple to ex-
plain completely our Asian per-
versions. But the tension de-
fined between man and his de-
vices Slater realizes in its most
hideous and painful expression.
The doubts the older genera-
tion may have about technolo-
gical sovereignty are further ex-
posed much to its embarrass-
ment, if not rage, by the youth
culture. That the aim to re-
connect us with each other and
ourselves, and to reestablish so-
cial priorities should be con-
sidered radical ideology is a de-
pressing comment in itself.
Slater believes such "radical-
ism" is seductive to old-culture
adherents although reluctant to
accept new values. The re-
mainder of his book is chiefly
concerned with t he evolution
and divergence of the new cul-
ture, its good and bad habits,
and the hope it extends to the
future.
Slater uses the film, The
Graduate, to highlight t h e
strain between old expectations

I

You may take an inexpensive summer SELF-DEFENSE COURSE -
ideal for busy people--just once or twice a week.
WOMEN-take an 8-week SELF-DEFENSE COURSE WEDNESDAY evening or
SATURDAY afternoon-your choice. STARTS WED., JUNE 24 and SAT,,
JUNE 27-practical techniques from KARATE and JUJITSU.
MEN AND WOMEN-special evening courses in KARATE and AIKIDO
CHILDREN-learn self-confidence and coordination
MARRIED STUDENTS have special lower rates

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"Toilet Assumption." We tend
to treat problems by flushing
them out of sight, therefore, out
of mind. We clear our consci-
ences by setting up commissions,
by producing TV documentaries,
by joining in "movements," by
putting Indians in "reserva-
tions," old folks in "homes," by
celebrating Earth Day. The eco-
logical movement is a good ex-
ample. The reviving days of
early April bloomed with zeal
and reverence, apparently tem-
poral qualities. Ideas are litter-
ed as easily as cans and candy
wrappers.
What frustrates the human
desire for dependence begins
with the strong independence
training we give our children,
who are forced to assume adult
values by means of internalized
or independent control mechan-
isms. Slater rightly blames
"love-oriented" child-r e a r i n g
techniques stressing r e a s o n
and dispassionate conceptualism.
Parents are to suppress their

I

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