100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 20, 1970 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



-lw-

-V

4i

Soturdov June0 1970

#a

a:

*"' THE MICHGAN DAILY V

420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michiaon Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reorints.

U.S. aid is not humanitarian,
but it's poltcally profitable

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 74
12 NonDeadline -Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

J

SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1970

News Phone: 764-0552

Its time haseo me
SEN. EVERETT DIRKSEN once said of the 1964 Civil
Rights act that "nothing is so powerful as an idea
whose time had come." It is evident that this was the
same force that last Wednesday produced congressional
action on the 18 year old vote.
A measure that would have lowered the voting age
in Oregon there was defeated overwhelmingly last month;
in other primaries around the country, candidates with
strong student support have faired poorly; and yet, poli-
ticians from the President on down continued to voice
their support for a drop in the minimum voting age.
From a politician's point of view. a lower minimum
voting age is attractive because it allows youth an oppor-
tunity to work directly within the system, hereby remov-
ing some of the causes of their deep resentment.
TE TRADITIONAL argument in defense of such a
measure has been the proverbial "old enough to fight,
old enough to vote."
But a more important reason is that like the blacks,
students have felt the "system" unresponsive and com-
pletely separated from themselves. In retaliation, they
have .taken to the streets. With the coming of black may-
ors, the black minority has found a new hope in America.
Though their problems are still present, a feeling of
participation is gradually overtaking them. Whether their
sense of belonging can continue remains to be seen. A
voting bloc of students could likewise produce a sense of
democracy in an individual.
Just how the young and the black take to joining the
"establishment" is irrelevant. Whether or not they are
pleased with their newly found power is not the point.
What matters is that these citizens are given what other
citizens have had for years. It is not an issue to be de-
bated. It is a vital brace in an ethical code that has re-
mained unfastened for far too long.
IF THIS COUNTRY truly intends to be a democracy it
must allow all groups to vote.
What is unfortunate is the need for this action to be
taken in Congress. Voting laws are the constitutional
rights of the states, and the probability that the Supreme
Court will strike down this measure are good.
In order to insure an 18-year-old vote, passage of
laws lowering voting age should be of prime importance
in the state -legislatures. Not because it would be to their
advantage, but because the concepts of democracy leave
them no other choice. Up until now political pressure,
and apathy has kept them from acting, but the time has
come for enfranchising youth.
-BILL ALTERMAN
N!GHT EDITOR: ROBERT KRAFTOWITZ

By STEVE WEISSMAN
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is reprinted with permission of
Ramparts Magazine.)
lN JUNE 1952, John D. Rockefel-
ler III, chairman of the -Rocke-
feller Foundation, hosted a highly
select conference of some 30 of the
nation's most eminent conserva-
tionists, public health experts,
Planned Parenthood leaders, agri-
culturalists, demographers and so-
cial scientists. After two and a
half days of intensive discussion,
they agreed to form a new group
which could act as "a coordinat-
ing and catalytic agent in the
broad field of population." The
following fall, John D. publicly
christened The Population Coun-
cil.
In the decades previous, birth
control had been largely small po-
tatoes. The Rockefeller Founda-
tion, otgether with the Milbank
Memorial Fund, had, in 1936, lyo-
vided Princeton with an Office
of Population Research. Mississip-
pi, Louisiana, Georgia, Florida and
the Carolinas pioneered programs
for the (sometimes voluntary)
sterilization of the poor.
ONCE THE Rockefellers became
interested, however, family plan-
ning became a very different kind
of business. The Ford Foundation,
Carnegie, the Commonwealth and
Community Funds, the Mott Trust
and the Mellons pumped fresh
blood and money into the Popula-
tion Council, some of which even
trickled over into the Reference
Bureau and Planned Parenthood.
The World Bank put its money
behind Princeton's pioneer study
on population and e c o n o m i c
growth in India. Where birth con-
trollers once went begging, now
guest lists at Planned Parenthood
banquets and signatures on unbi-
quitous New York Times ads read
like a cross between the Social
Register and Standard and Poor's
Directory of Corporation Execu-
tives.
THIS SUDDEN interest of the
world's rich in the world's poor,
whatever the humanitarian im-
pulse, made good dollars and
cents. World War II had exhaust-
ed the older colonial empires, and
everywhere the cry of nationalism
sounded: from Communists in
China and Southeast Asia, from
neutralists in Indonesia and India,
from independence movements in
Africa and from economic nation-
alists in Latin America..
But the doughty old buzzards of
empire were determined to save
the species. They would pay defer-
ence to the new feelings by en-
couraging a bit of light industry
here, and perhaps even a steel
mill there. To give the underde-
veloped areas what Nelson Rocke-
feller termed "a community of in-
terest with us," and to extend
control, they would give public

loans and foreign aid for roads,
dams, and schools. Their founda-
tions and universities would train
a new class of native managers
who, freed from outmoded ideolo-
gies, would clearly see' that there
was more than enough for both
rich and poor.
But there wasn't enough, espe-
cially not when the post-war ex-
port of death-control technology
created so many more of the poor.
The poor nations r a r e 1 y came
close to providing even the limited
economic security which w o u l d
encourage people to give up the
traditional peasant security of a
large family anti permit the popu-
lation curve to level off.
In fact, for much of the popula-
tion, the newly-expanded money
economy actually increased inse-
curity. Faced with this distortion
between fertility and development,
developed country elites could see
no natural way of stopping popu-
lation growth. All they could see.
was people, people, people, each
one threatening the hard-won
stability which guaranteed access
to the world's ores and oil, each'
one an additional competitor for
the use of limited resources.
- More people, moreover, meant
younger people, gunpowder for
more than a mere population ex-
plosion. And as reported in the
Rockefeller Fund's overpowering
Prospect for America, "In a com-
pletely youthful population, impa-
tience to realize rising expecta-
tions is likely to be pronounced.
Extreme nationalism has often
been the result."
FOR ALL THEIR domestic con-
cern, however, population plan-
ners were primarily absorbed in
"the international dilemma" and
the problems of "economic devel-

opment." They .emphasized top-
down national planning, Western-
influenced elites, foreign aid pene-
tration, and the use of economic
growth, rather than distribution
and welfare, to measure develop-
ment.
The New look in intervention
got a good test in the Indian
famine of 1965 and 1966.
In 1958, India faced a devastat-
ing foreign exchange crisis. In re-
sponse, the World Bank and the
"Aid India Club" promised one
billion dollars a year in aid, and
international- i n v e s t o r s found
themselves with golden opportuni-
ties. The Ford Foundation quickly
stepped in with a "food crisis'
team of experts, which pushed
India's planners into increased
agricultural spending, ultimately
at the expense of planned invest-
ments in housing and other-social
services.
B U T WESTERN PRESSURE
was of little avail until the failure
of the summer monsoons in 1965.
Then, in the words of the World
Bank's Pearso. Report, "Instead
of signing annual or multiyear
(food) sales agreements, as with
other countries and with India
itself, in earlier years, the United
States doled out food aid a few
months at a time as policy con-
ditions were agreed upon."
India, faced with a short leash
on food supplies, acceded to the
foreign pressures. : "Call them
'strings,' call them 'conditions,' or
whatever one likes," boasted the
New York Times, "India has lit-
tle choice now but to agree to
many of the terms that the United
States, through the World Bank,
is putting on its aid. For India
simply has nowhere e 1 s e to
turn."
' Ramparts Magazine

FOR RENT

The Ann Arbpr Fair Housing Ordi-
nance and the University of Mich-
igan Regents' bylaws prohibit dis-
crimination in housing. Questions
should be directed to Off-Campus
Housing, 764-7400.
ON CAMPUS, singles for male grad
students or teaching fellows, clean,
very quiet, linens, no cooking. 723
packard near State. 5C35
AIR-CONDITIONED 1 BDRM. APTS.
Avail. Now. 761-2680
UNIVERSITY TOWERS
536 . Forest
7035

Letters to the Editor

Oh mercy me
To the Editor:
RE: Use of the term FRISBEE
in "Rites of Spring in Ann Arbor"
(Daily, April 9).
If this had happened years agd,
we'd have taken an 'Aspirin, dried
our tears with a Kleenex and
paced the Linoleum floor.
But because people kept on put-
ting a slash bar through those
registered trademarks, the manu-
facturers were stripped of their
rights. The words were lower cased
and exploited by competitors and
imitators.
We didn't want that to happen
to us. We thought of emulating
Rosten's Hyman Kaplan, and.
sektding out releases about our
H*U*L*A H*O*O*P F*R*I*S-
B*E*E.I

However, we were afraid if we
did that, the poor linotype opera-
tors would wind up with a bad
case of Frisbee Finger, reaching
so frequently for the asterick
key.
Seriously, Frisbee is a Wham-O
Manufacturing Company register-
ed trademark (Registration No.
679-186). The proper reference to
our product is Frisbee (R).
To paraphrase Mr. Franklin P.
Adams' famous poem:
"These are the saddest of pos-
sible words - aspirin, cellophane
and linoleum."
Please don't add us to that list.
Thank you from the bottom of
our registered trademark.
-Robert G. Payne
Sales vice-president

1 BDRM, turn. apt. $135 and $145 in-
cludes utilities, parking, 1 yr. or 8
mor lease. 761-2939. 8Ctc
GARAGE, 723 Packard. 6C35
PHI ALPHA KAPPA, located one block
from the central campus, has rooms
for the summer and offers room and
board for the fall. For further infor-
matlon contact, Ronald Dirkse, 1010
-E. Ann,: Ann Arbor. Phone 761-5491.
7CRF
2 BDRM. furn, apt. $210 for 3 persons,
includes utilities, parking. 761-2939.
9Ctc
1 AND 2 BDRM., furn, units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. SOCtc
EAST University at Hill St.-1 BDRM.
Apt., $100. July 1. 769-7346. 2035
EDINBURGH APTS., 912Brown St. The
Royal Dutch Apts., 715 Church. The
King's Inn Apts., 1939 Dewey. Taking
applications for fall rental for all 3
locations. For rental information call
761-6156 or 761-3466. 4C41
2 AND 3 BDRM. TOWNHOUSES, $130-
150 per month, initial deposit $390,
chilren and pets welcome. Arbor Park,
located off Ellsworth Rd., west of
Platt. Taking applications for near
future occupancy. Management office
2990 S. State, 761-9026. 20035
JULY-AUG. SUBLET-Modern furnish-
ed 2-bdrm. apt. Air-conditioning.
(Also available for fall). Call 769-
5903 after 5:00. 47033,
2 BDRM. TOWNHOUSES, $139 per mo.,
initial deposit $400, Children and pets
welcome. Arbor Manor, located on
2nd Ave., south of Michigan Ave.,
near Monroe, in Ypsi. Taking applica-
tions for near future occupancy.
Management office 2990 S. State, 761-
9026. _19C35
AVAIL. FOR SUMMEit & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 am. to 21
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. - .11tc
711 ARCH-Near State and Packard-
Modern 2-bdrm, apts. for Fall. Dish-
washer, balcony, air-cond., and much
more Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Ctc
Summit
Assoc i ates
CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FALL
761-8055I
49Ctec
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's _Store
NEED LEVIS?;
VISIT-
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims.......6.50
Button-Fly.6.50
Traditional.6.98
Bells ... .. . . 7.50

FOR RENT SUMMER SUBLET
MUSIC LOVER needed for one bdrm. BI-LEVEL, modern 4-man. patio. air- 2
apt. now or in fall. $120. William St. cond., dishw., 1 block from Diag,
above Bike Shop. Dbl. bed in back July-Aug. Call 769-1889. 24U35
room of new Community Record--
Collection. Lots of music and people. JULY-AUG. sublet. Need 2 girls to
761-3690 or Anita at 761-0828. DC33 complete 4-man apartment in Heri- C
tage House. Terms negotiable. Call
665-3663. 25U35-
WANTED--2 chicks to share apt. for
fall, ideal location. 769-1647. 26U35
NEW FURNISHED APARTMENT AVAILABLE immediately - Sublet for
EFRSHMERDOFALTL T two girls in 5-man apt., bi-level, air
FOR SUMMER OR FALL conditioning, dishwasher, near cam-
at 543 CHURCH ST. pus,4rent negotiable. Call 769-6224 orS
APT. 16 769-6424 after 5 p.m. 15U35
TWO-MAN apartment for rent for F
DAHL AN ummer term. Air conditioned, close
DAH LMANIN __ __ "8__""28s
campus. Call 761-2802. 28U35
A PA RTM E N TS CHICKS! Yourtown roomina groovy
545 CHURCH ST. now. 27-U35
7$1-7600 IDEAL for JULY-AUGUST. 2 bdrm., 2-3_
38Ctci man, well furn., mod. apt. with sepa-
3 .. ..rate living, dining and kitchen area.
AUGUST OCCUPANCY Air-cond., balcony, close to campus,
665-2605. DU35
(2 bdrm. unit-summer % term) PAD FOR CHICK-Own room, air cond.,
near campus. Cheap. Summer half.
Campus area, cool, furnished apart- na aps ha.Sme af
ments. 1 and 2 bdrm.-ample park- 662-$686. 16U33
ing, contact Resident Manager, Apt. MODERN EFFICIENCY, July and Aug-
102, 721 S. Forest St. 16Ctc ust. Furnished. 761-5382 after 5:00.
17U35
Cam pus-Hospital 1 MAN to have his own bdrm. in a 2-
man apt. A/C. $60. Close to campus.
July and August occupancy. Call 769--
Fa I I Occupancy _764_ s18t35
NEEDED-1 girl to sublet, July-August,
Furnished Apartments modern 4-man apt., close to campus,
rent is negot. Call 769-7544. DU35
Campus Management, lnc. JULY-AUG.-Your own room in a huge
662-7787 335 E. Huron 2-man, 2-bdrm. apt., whole second
47Ctc floor of house. $45/mo. 663-9905. 6U33
JULY-AUG. SUBLET in spacious two
2-BEDROOM furnished, quiet, close to bedroom two-man apt., modern, well
campns, parking. Mgr. 101-202. July- furnished, with separate living, din-
Aug. $150/mo.-Fall 4-man, $290. 927 ing, and kitchen area, balcony. 2 fe-
S. Forest, after 5 p.m. 662-6156. C35 males-cheap. Call 665-2605 between
5-6 p.m. DU35
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus, -.-
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663- 6-7 BEDROOM HOUSE, July-Aug., good
6448. 15Ctc location, parking, 3 bathrooms, freez-
er, washer-dryer, big back yard, etc.,
etc., etc. 761-5052 or 665-5671. 7U35
THE ABBEY THE LODGE___ I
CARRIAGE HOUSE SUBLET-One bdrm. apt. with double
THE FORUM VISCOUNT bed available for July-August. Fully
still the local favorites! Several select .$95/mo. 663-1605. 8U3
apartments available for summer and SUBLET for July and August-2-3 man,
fall semesters in each of these modern ideal for couple, one minute from
buildings, campus. 761-6825. 9U33
ara y SUMMER SUBLET - Large, lux~,air-
Cha rter Rea Iy c 3b b6-01
Scond., 3 bdrm., bi-level. 769-5041.
Fine Campus Apartments 10U35
1335 S. University 665-8825kAAA n Ctr'rr
0

SUMMER RENTALS
hoice Apts. at- low rates, Ann
Trust Co. Phone 769-2800.

Arbor
22083

J35
THESES, PAPERS (inc. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291. 42Jtc
TASK
Does It All!
Typing, Printing, Transcripting
Conferences and Mailings
Call The Professionals
761-4146 or 47
30J5
NOW ON CAMPUS
Campus MultiService

TYPING
PRIN'TING
THESIS SERVICE
Fast, Dependable, Low-Priced
214 Nickels Arcade 662-4222
Summer hours: 10-4 Mon-Fri.

i

SUMMER SUBLET
2-AN APART., near campus, air-cond.
Garage, disposal. July-Aug. Call 662-
6126. 40U33

3J tc

MULTI PLE

TYPING
SERVICE
'Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pic-k-U 1 and Del ivery

.;
j
{

BUSINESS SERVICES
SUEDE vests, belts, etc., half the store
price, tailor-made. Call' Steve, 769-
1468. 23J33
SUPER-QUICK service, cheap. Call
Candy for TYPING at 665-4830. DJ'5
FOR PAINTING, carpet, and wall clean-
ing, call 769-7694. Professional Job.
21J34
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. l2Jtc
EXPERIENCED EDITOR
Skilled in organizing and
presenting special projects.
Write Mich. Daily Box 68 or
phone 971-6445.

1
I_
I
2
5
r
f
T
T
I
1
i
I
i
r

I
I
i
i
i
f
G
i
!s

i
j,
I
i
i
i
f

zoctc
Apartments
Limited
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENTS FOR FALL

7 8055-~ Available

r01- ov).

l4Utc

663-0511
761-5440
SOCtc
2-3 BDRM TOWNHOUSES, $126-154 per
mo., initial deposit $360-420. Children
and pets welcome. Danbury Green,
located on McArthur Blvd., north of
Clark Road, Ypsi. Taking applications
for near future occupancy. Manage-
ment office 2990 S. State, 761-9026.
18035
DYNAMITE MODERN 2-man apartment.
1 block from campus. July-Aug. Must
lease-$100/mo. Call 769-6246 after 6
p.m. 49033
1 BDRM. unfurnished and furnished
units, swimming pool and party room,
away from campus. McKinley Assoc.,
663-6448. 3035

CAMPUS-- Large 4-man, 2-bdrm., from
July 1 to Aug. 25. A/C, parking,
laundry. Phone 662-6252 or 761-4373.
11U35
4TH. GIRL for July-Aug., own bdrm.
Call 769-0389 after 9. 12U33
MAN FOR July-Aug., modern furn.
apt., balcony, dishwasher, air-cond.,
near Campus Corners. $40. 761-6687.
13U35
ROOMS TO RENT in large house. Neg.
rates, incl use of all facilities inel.
washer, dryer, freezer. 761-9880 eves.
1U33
1 BEDROOM, 1-2 Man--Liv. rm., kit.,
bath, large. Call 769-6459 between 6-9
p.m. only. 47U33
NEED MEN through August for 3 bdrm.
house. Air-cond., parking. Call 761-
4809. 39U33
SUBLET 2-man apt. July-Aug. Air-
cond., mucho parking, 911 S. Forest.
Call 769-0289. 36U33j
ROOMMATE for huge old apartment
out Washtenaw, trees, grass. $35. 769-
4925. 31U33

Prompt Service
CALL 971-2446
PERSONAL

PAPERS written and typed, cheap, very
fast. Esp. Eng. 662-6985. 7F35,
TO AVOID the blistered noonday tripes
--Student Book Service will now be
open EVENINGS from 7:00 to 10:30.
40F:33
MAKE LOVE NOT WAR
(It's good for our business)
AUSTIN DIAMOND
1209 S. University
663-7151
U-M MALE professional student, emo-
tionally stable, rationally liberal, in-
terested in many things and life in
general-wants to meet mature stable
girl. This ad is placed in order to
meet new faces, not because I am
hurting! Reply to Mich. Daily, Box
50. F33
BROWSE in drafty comfort--we'll keep
the front and back doors ppen. SBS
will now be open EVENINGS only-
7:00 to 10:30. 38F33

Jtc

C

Sa A FEWLOFUs ARC
"Tt -flt1= k.MEHOR AL..
AA BFRE AJY OFOS
WAS rtcrN oLT-

WAN J OVrOF 7IfCPARK
M~s5S UDDENLY w'APPEA2
7}t15 OL..76U<
f{ LSAfl'E'AR5 !00
K~ s HEl 1c

NAMD Cie: RAIN~1M
MUiICU-

K1{fQSHCM6EV IN JA MTCh-
I

AWL QO F JC2V lOift L
NM OF A -W UM~FA
NW
502 FARL'i o
'cLL2S Y

CRY1&Y
DianPubishes-}a31 yadcaf

Xff
Ni(N

BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS ...........
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's
(4 Colors-
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's.......
vI S -*---* *

2.49
5.50

911 S. Forest
Near Hill St.-Modern 2 Bdrm., 3-man
668-6906. Fall. l4Ctc
SUMMER SUBLET
EFFICIENCY and very large 1 bdrm
directly" on campus, avail. July and
August. 668-6906. 19U35
JULY AND AUGUST sublet - Furn.,
air-cond., effic., on campus. Call 665-
0344 before 1 p.m. 20U35
GREAT July-Aug. Sublet -- Two bed-
room, well furnished, mod. apt. with
living, dining and kitchen area, bal-
cony, very close to campus. Females
only. Can1 665-2605 5-6 p.m. DU35
SUBLET a 1-bdrm. apt., large living
room, etc., near campus and down-
town. Ideal for any kind of couple.
Avail. 6/27. Very Cheap. 662-6985.
21U35
NEED 3RD MAN for mod. 3-man apt.,
July-Aug. sublet, very close to cam-
pus, dishwasher, air-cond. 769-4144.
22U35
GROOVY, mod., 4-man, near hoasp.,
parking, disp., A/C, available now.

6.98
8.50

Nuvo's_

Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam's Store
122 E. Washington

Valid through June 21, 1970 * Limit one coupen per customer
211 N. Main, 663-7758

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan