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June 20, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-20
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Page Ten

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, June 20, 1970

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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sityplayersmichiganrepertory70universityplayersmichigcnreper tory70universityplayersmichiganrepertory7Ouniversityplayersm
THE UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
-present--
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MICHIGAN
REPERTORY

Shakespeare
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MERCHANT OF VENICE

C
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bigotry, greed and romantic love
in a subtle and complex blend of
high drama and delightful comedy

In Repertory
July 14--25

a disturbing, prophetic story of America
in crisis and'the harvest of shame reaped
by men disowned by their society

garson kanin
BORN YESTERDAY
a rough diamond is polished
too well, and the process is hilarious
peter nichols
JOE EGG
highly acclaimed in London and New York,
this recent play examines a troubled marriage
and a retarded child in a moving, humorous
and totally surprising way

July 28-August

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MIAMI (A-A dusk-to-dawn
curfew in black neighborhoods
here was lifted yesterday after
s o m e 300 volunteer black
peacemakers restored at least
temporary calm to a city
I which has been wracked with
four days of racial violence.
City Manager Melvin Reese
lifted the curfew inside the city
limits and police returned to
normal duties. The curfew in un-
incorporated areas remained in
effect, however.'
twThe peacemakers, .in' groups of
two and three, roamed through
slum areas calling for an end to
rock throwing, firebombing, loot-
ing and sniper fire. Their actions
came after a meeting of 30 black
leaders at the home of Athalie
Range, the city commissioner.
Thirteen persons have been
shot, none fatally, during the dis-
turbances, which followed reports
that a white supermarket owner
had insulted a black housewife.
"Once it started, the rioting
was continued by groups of rest-
less young people who find some
pleasure in terrorizing others."
Mrs. Range said. "No one knows
who were the leaders---if there
were any leaders."
Reese, County Manager Porter
Homer and Sheriff E. Wilson Pur-

August 4-8

No Iinjuries;
man convict~ed
in NY blasts
BERKELEY, Calif. (AP-Bombs ex-
ploded yesterday at two branches of
the Bank of America, the latest in
a series of violent acts against the
nation's largest bank.
The blasts, which shattered dozens of
windows, came within seven minutes of
each other in the early morning hours
but did little structural dcmage. There
were r)r injuries.
Meanwhile, in New York, Samuel J.
Melville was sentenced to prison for at
least 13 years yesterday for the bombing
of eight government and private build-
ings during a four-month campaign of
anti-establishment terrorism.
The bearded leader of a band of youth-
ful revolutionaries, Melville was one of
five persons, two of them women, orig-
inally charged with the series of bomb-
ings, which included three Manhattan
skyscrapers as targets.
Antiwar demonstrators have described
the Bank of America as a symbol of the
"capitalist establishment." The worst in-
cident was in Isla Vista, adjacent to the
University of California's Santa Barbara
campus, where a $300,000 branch was
burned in February. A student was fa-
tally shot in another disturbance.
Bank of America officials have re-
peatedly denounced the violence, de-
scribing it as "troublesomely reminiscent"
of riots by the Brown Shirts in the late
1920s that led to the rise of Nazi Ger-
many.
Earlier this week, two persons were ar-
rested for spray-painting the words, "Dig
Isla, Vista" on the walls of one of the
Berkeley branches which were bombed
yesterday. Police said there.-was no evi-
dence of any connection.
Each bank is about five blocks from the
University of California campus here, in
different directions.
Police said a person who was awake just
before the first blast reported seeing a
van-type vehicle with two occupants
leaving the scene.
The first bomb went off at 3:52 a.m.
against the south side of the branch at
Telegraph Avenue and Russell Street. It
blew a hole six inches deep and a foot
in diameter in foundation.
At 3:59 a.m., a cigar-box mixture of
firecracker powder, wires, light bulb fil-
aments, a battery and a clock went off
against the Shattuck Avenue branch. One
window was broken in the bank.

BOX OFFICE OPENS
MONDAY, JUNE 22

Season Tickets Only
June 22-30

Individual Tickets
Beginning July 1

PRICES: (SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS OFFER SAVINGS AND PREFERRED LOCATIONS)

Season Subscriptions:
Individual Tickets:

REGULAR:
WEEKEND:
MIXED:

(Tues., Wed., Thurs.) -$6.50, $5.00
(Fri.-Sat.) -$8.50, $7.00
(weekdays and weekends mixed) -add
50c for each Friday or Saturday ticket
ordered to regular price above.

dy met with leaders of the Black
Coalition and received a list of
short-range grievances. It called
for investigation of charges of in-
discriminate firing by police into
homes and apartments, and for
more jobs for teen-age blacks.
Fred Weller. owner of the
grocery store around which the
disturbances ocurred, held a news
conference yesterday :nd claimed
black leaders planned the rioting
because they "don't want white
ownership in their community."
"They want to run over you and
possess you," Weller said.
.Blackshad accused Weller of
selling bad meat and produce.
jacking up prices, cha; ging as
much as $5 to cash Social Security
checks, and insulting black cus-
tomers.
Mrs. Range said the charges
should have been pursued through
legal channels, and then there
would have been no disturbances.
Daily Official Bulletin
Saturday, June 20
General Notices
Grade Sheets for Spring Half have
been sent to depts. for instructors. All
grade sheets should be submitted with-
in 5 days of the exam, and no later
than Wed.. July 1, 12:00 noon. A grade
messenger service will be provided on
regular basis by Office of the Registrar
to departmental offices on the central
Campus Fri., June 26 - 12:00 noon,
Thurs., July 2. Grades may also be sub-
mitted directly to Office of Regis trar
at "Window A," L.S.A. Bldg during
working hours. Questions may be di-
rected to 764-6292.
Student I.D. Cards: Any student .D.
card marked "Valid Spring or Winter
1970 Only" must be replaced before
student may register for Summer term.
1970. This may be done by making ap-
plication at "Window A" in L. S. A.
Bldg. before June 26. Proper notifica-
tion of correct social security no.
should be avail, when applic, is made.
Students should check I.D. cards for
errors; first 9 digits of student no.
should be equal to his soc. sec. no.; in-
correct cards should be brought to
"Window A" L.S.A. Bldg. for replace-
ment. No fee will be charged.
For Summer term registration, June
29 - 30, ail matters concerning I.D.
cards w i11 be handled in Lobby of
L.S.A. Bldg. Summer I.D. cards distrib-
uted at this location June 29-July 1
during working hours.
Placemenit Service
General Division
3200 S.A.B.
Openings in S.E. Mich, areas, others
nationwide:
Bureau of Industrial Relations,.sem-
inar registrar, starting early Aug., co-
ordinate mgmt. seminar plans, BA any
area and secretarial exper. in business
setting preferable.
High Scope Educ. Research Founda-
tion, Ypsi., receptionist, typing ability,
degree not nec.

-Associated Press
Ruiisfelc d (iseiusses poverty program
At a news conference yesterday, Donald Rumsfeld, 37-year-old director of the
Office of Economic Opportunity, said his future aim will be to secure broad
national support for solving the problems of the poor.
INQUIRIES THWARTED
Grand Jury probes
JaSckson St. kilings
JACKSON, Miss. W)--The federal gov- N. Mitchell said yesterday. "The grand
rnment, thwarted in efforts to gain Mis- jury will make a detailed investigation
ssippi Highway Patrol cooperation in of what actually happened on this oc-

its investigation of last month's violence
at Jackson State College, announced yes-
terday that a special federal grand jury
will be convened here June 29 to probe
the disorders.
"This federal grand jury is expected to
make a complete investigation of all as-
pects surrounding the incident which oc-
curred at Jackson State College May 15
to determine whether or not any federal
laws were violated," U.S. Atty. Gen. John

TUES., WED., THURS.-$2.00, $1.50
FRI., SAT.-$2.50, $2.00

M
He
The I
Defense
recommi
grams-
that the
campus:
Presid
Regents
ment or
reached
COmmitt
ing the
The cl
last Dec
ulty, ine:
-The
bers by
fessional
who hol
departm
-The
faculty,
appointe
ROTC s
ricula;
-The
of a "prl
"depart
-The
ing cedi
stlucto's
pointmer
adopted
college.
The Ri
of 12 co
ulty, pre
faculty
credit in
The m
cations v
bers last
Assembly
body.
The fa
a month
against t
pus.
Curren
$89,000 a
rent was
to some
$200,00. '
rently sp
cluding si
programs
Prix
RO
PRINC
versity an
nate its I
program i
Universi
said the
had accej
faculty an
is compw~
members.
Student;
recommem
programs
followedt
Cambodia
students a
during a <
chosen to
bers to re

In a stg
felt the R(
and the u
the progra
their accej
undergradt
"that regr(
The pros
here earlie
rules that
ROTC cot
training p

er
si

Note: The higher priced tickets are the first 17 rows of orchestra and first 4 rows of balcony.
ALL PERFORMANCES IN THE AIR CONDITIONED LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE, MICHIGAN LEAGUE.
CURTAIN: 8:00 P.M. SHARP!
Tuesday | Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday,
July 14-18 J14 MER. J15 MICE J16 MER. J17 MICE J J1S MER.
July 21-25 J21 MICE J22 MER. J23 MICE J24 MER. J25 MICE3
July 28-Aug. 1 J28 BORN J29 BORN 3J30 BORN J31 BORN Al BORN
Aug. 4-8 A4 EGG A5 EGG A6 EGG A7 EGG A8 EGG
SEASON SUBSCRIBERS PLEASE NOTE: By ordering the same day for all four weeks you automati-
r,1il

casion."
Two young black students were shot
to death during the second night of dis-
turbances on the predominantly black
campus.
The announcement of the federal probe,
officials here said, was not unexpected.
There were reports more than a week ago
that federal authorities would convene
the grand jury because of state reluctance
to turn over highway patrol weapons to
FBI agents for examination.
Asst. Atty. Gen. Jerris Leonard con-
ferred with state officials recently in an
effort to obtain permission to interrogate
highway patlolmen who were on the
scene when the firing occurred. He in-
dicated later _he was unsuccessful.
Mississippi Gov. John Bell Williams
has said the officers fired in self defense
because they were drawing sniper fire.
Williams also said federal officers were
unwilling to cooperate in the state probe
of the incident, and "they must learn that
cooperation is a two-way street."
Some 200 to 300 rifle and shotgun were
fired by officers into a women's dormitory
during a confrontation with a crowd of
young blacks in front of the building. Stu-
dents vehemently denied reports of sniper
fire from the campus during the en-
counter.
When the barrage ended, the two
youths lay dead and nine were wounded.
Phillips Gibbs of Ripley, a 20-year-old
junior at the college, was cut down in
front of the dormitory. James Earl Green,
a 17-year-old high school senior, was
found dead across the street, behind the
point from which officers unleashed the
barrage. Pathologists said both died of
shotgun wounds.
A spokesman for the governor said he
would stand by an earlier statement that.
he would "cooperate with any duly con-
stituted investigative body."
In that statement, Williams had said
he would refuse a subpoena to testify
before any grand jury.

cai y see allt our plays.
Box Office Hours:
June 22-July 10 July 13-Aug. 8
12:30-5:00, Mon.-Fri, 12:30-8:00; performance days
Cosed July 3, 4, 5
sityplayersmich iganrepertory70vniversityplayersmich iganreper tory70universityplayersmichiganrepertory70universityplayersm

-Associated Press

Kent State to reopen

Kent State University students registered yesterday without incident for summer
classes scheduled to begin Monday. The university has been closed since May 4
when four students were shot to death in a confrontation with the Ohio National
wuard.

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