100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 19, 1970 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-19
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


p p -.
N a 'F

Page Eight

-W

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, June 19, 1970

a/

a

7

Friday, June 19, 1970 -k

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00 12 Nen Deaiine

Am mricans

all

PETS AND SUPPLIES
ADOPTABLE, ADORABLE kittens, 21
months old, housebroken. Call -662-
8603 or 665-8375. 10T35
KITTENS $1; eight weeks old, litter-
trained females make good pets, two
grey tigers, one black and white. Call
971-4762. 9T32
FREE 2 friendly kittens. Call 761-4914.
8T32
ROOMMATES WANTED
OLDER MALE for comfortable 3 bdrm.
duplex, on West side. $75/mo. includ-
ing utilities and phone. 665-3330 and
764-9454. 3Y32
ROOMMATE WANTED for 2-bdrm., bt-
level, modern apt. For Summer half
only. Call V.J., 761-6091 persistently.
1Y32
NEED ROOMMATE till Aug., own room,
on campus. 761-9766 after 7. 2Y35
FOR YOU $40/mo. Female, own room,
on campus. Now thru August. Maybe
fall option. 761-5896. 48Y35
3RD MALE GRAD for 3-4 man house
beg. Sept., partly furn.. near cam-,
pus, own bdrm. $65/mo. and util. 665-
8047 after 6 p.m. 49Y35
IS THIS WHAT YOU WANT?
Huge 4-man with A/C, dishwasher,
parking, hi-fi, etc. 2 or 3 needed now
or summer. It'll make you happy.
663-7178. Y32
GIRL GRAD seeks room, apt., or room-
mates for Fall. Will pay or work. Call
668-6095. 46Y35
MALE GRAD. needs roommates for fall.
Call 761-3674. 47Y33
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
1970 HONDA GB 350. $650 or best offer.
761-1916. 12Z35
SUZUKI 250 cc, X-6- Hustler Road-
machine. FAST. $439 or offer. 769-
4488. 11Z35
HONDA 300 Scrambler. 769-3952. 323
John St. Best offer. 10Z35
MOTORCYCLE tune-ups, 1 day service.
Call 665-3114 for appointment. 9Z35
HONDA 125 Scrambler - 3,500 miles.
Great shape. 1036 Oakland, No. 2.
4Z32

BIKES AND SCOOTERS
DESPERATE-I want a small motor-
cycle that's in good used condition.
Call Sara, 769-3215. DZ35
USED CARS
CLASSIC CAR-Triumph TR-3. Good
condition. Hard and soft tops. $895 or
offer. 769-4488. 48N35
1964 OLDS, Jetstar I, excellent condi-
tion, 49,000 miles, best offer. 769-
2396. r46N(34
1962 SUNBEAN Alpine. Ray Lewis, 761-
6867. Good trans., rebuilt eng. 47N33
'67 OLDS 442-New engine, almost en-
tirely rebuilt. Excellent condition.
769-4289. NDd
1969 KARMANN GHIA. In excellent
condition. Call 663-4821. 44N33
CHEVY IMPALA, 1967 4 door, auto-
matic, power steering, V-8, radio,
good condition. 769-3341 after 5. 45N32
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
STEREO-FM system, KL and H. Gar-
rard, and Hardon-Kardon compon-
ents, negot. 761-3273, Barbara. X35
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Instruments and accessories, new and
used. Lessons, repairs. 209 State.
665-8001. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. X
RADIO, TV, Hi-Fl repair. House calls-
Very Reasonable! Very Cheap!! 769-
6250. DX35
PR. SONY SS-23 speakers, 1 yr. old,
still in factory container-never used.
769-0894 after 6:30 p.m. 3X32
AM/FM STEREO 35 watt receiver. Best
offer. Must sell. 761-9593. 2X33

HELP WANTED
BELL TOWER INN needs male student
(accounting studies desirable)- for re-
lief night auditor. Fri. and Sat, night.
Apply at desk. H35
BABYSITTER WANTED, room and
board, $20/wk. salary, in country.
Call after 7 p.m., 461-1008. 43H35
WANTED-Young attractive woman for
front office, full time. For inquiry
phone 662-2576. 40H34
EARN $25 by donating cerebrospinal
fluid. Need 21-40 yr. old males-fe-
males. 764-0298. 25H27
KNOW WHO'S making all the money
this summer? The dealers!! The Big
Steel Ballroom needs dealers, make
yourself as much (legal) cash as you
need all summer . , . Call Steve at
769-0245 for details. 39H33
EARN $25 by donating cerebrospinel
fluid. Need 21-40 yr. old males-fe-
males. 764-0298. 25H27
PHOTO SUPPLIES
CAMERA, Kanon FX plus lens, must
sell. 483-3372 after 6. 28D31
UIVITAR 200 mm. preset lens. Call
Ron, 761-7209. 29033

CHEAP, CHEAP, Cheap-1 or 2 girls
needed to help divide $90 Aho. furn-
ished 2 bdrm. apt. close to campus.
Call Margi or Peggy at 483-4683. X33
ALTO SAX and CLARINET and trom,
and drum set. Must sell. Best offer.
Call 662-4058. 1X33
FOR SALE-SPINET PIANO
Wanted, responsible party to take over
low monthly payments on a spinet
piano. Can be seen locally. Write
Credit Manager, P.O. Box 276, Shelby-
viller, Indiana. 48X32

AT CENTURY
The Best in
Good Used Cameras
WE BUY, SELL, TRADE
Everything Photographic
DARKROOM SUPPLIES
LUMINOUS PAPER
Repairs on all makes
Century Camera
(At our new location)
4254 N. Woodward; Royal Oak
'Between 13 and 14 Mile Rd.
LI 9-6355
Take 1-94 to Southfield Expr. North to
13 Mile Road-then East to
Woodward and North
(Michigan Bank, Security and Diner
Charges accepted)
lDti

FOR SALE
12x60 STAR MOBILE HOME, 1 yr. old,
furn. Call 483-1297. 1B35
SUNFISH sailboat, $400. Fine Flamingo
guitar, $160. 665-3330. 2B32
YORK automobile air-conditioner, used
2 hours. Complete $90. 665-3993. 3B34
SELL YOURSELF
on Daily classifieds
764-0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557
SONY T.V. w/cabinet, excellent condi-
tion, good value, $90. Call 769-1041.
46B32
15-FT. TRAVEL TRAILER, couble di-
nette, brakes, propane. Sleeps 7. Anti
Sway Bar. $1000 of best offer. 665-5017.
41B29
TRANSPORTATION
RIDER NEEDED to Syracuse, N.Y.,
leaving Saturday the 20th. 761-1354.
32032
SHARE rented VAN to N.Y.C. area.
Riders too. Lv. June 25 or 26. 769-
4591, Bob. 33G35
FOR SALE-Round trip ticket to Eur.,
Windsor to London, June 26-Aug. 6,
very inexpensive, avail, immediately.
Call anytime (preferably after 4), 761-
2240. 30035
RIDER NEEDED to California, leaving
end of June. 663-7371. 28G32
RIDER(S) WANTED for round trip
(anywhere). Dep. 6-27, Ret. 7-23.
663-0174. 29G32
BUSINESS SERVICES
SUEDE vests, belts, etc., half the store
price, tailor-made. Call Steve, 769-
1468. 23J33
SUPER-QUICK service, cheap. Call
Candy for TYPING at 665-4830. DJ35
FOR PAINTING, carpet, and wall clean-
ing, call 769-7694. Professional Job.
21J34
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
EXPERIENCED EDITOR
Skilled in organizing and
presenting special projects.
Write Mich. Daily Box 68 or
phone 971-6445.
J35
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. - Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291. 42Jtc
NOW ON CAMPUS
Campus MultiService
TYPING
PRINTING
THESIS SERVICE
Fast, Dependable, Low-Priced
214 Nickels Arcade 662-4222
Summer hours: 10-4 Mon.-Fri.
3Jtc
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
general Office and Secretarial Work'
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Servtoe
CALL 971-2446

PERSONAL
NEED FIGURE MODELS, tall, mature.
$5.00/hr. 761-4687 eves. 9F35
THE ONLY PLACE in Ann Arbor to
buy her diamond engagement ring.
CHECK IT.
AUSTIN DIAMOND
1209 S. University 663-7151 F
A NEW EXPERIMENT 'in capitalistic
pig culture-SBS will try it in the
EVENINGS, 7:00-10:30. 42F33
SANDER LEVIN has immediate open-
ings for the summer. Pay is terrible,
often non-existent, however respon-
sibility and challenge are great. Con-
tact Peter Elliott, Levin for Gov., 400
Mich. Bldg., Bagley Ave., Detroit.
10F35
SUMMER HEBREW classes organizing,
beginners, intermediates. 761-6784.
4F32
FREE CRAFT FAIR
Artists-sell your handicrafts-
FREE U. CRAFT FAIR
JULY 17-18 DIAG
(concurrent with South U. Street fair,
open to everyone). Please register
now: 763-2130 or 663-2709. 3F32
PAINTING - Student desires painting
jobs, inside and outside. Four years
experience. Call 662-4736. FD
GIRLS:
A Summer Law Club Dating Service
will professionally match you up
exclusively with law students at no
cost.
Send the following information
which must include name, address,
phone number, height, and interests;
which may include a picture, age,
year in school, and anything else. All
information wI* remain confidential.
Mail to Law Club Social Committee,
c/o Lawyer's Club, 551 S. State Street.
2185
BLOOD IS RED, bruises are blue, come
to SBS and we'lr comfort you (come
EVENINGS 7:00 to 10;30) 41F33.
SOVIET UNION. Driving and Camping
10 weeks, $1350. Includes air and all
expenses. A. Lipson, 2 Garden Terr.,
Cambridge, Mass. 02138 or call (col-
lect) 617-547-1127. 40F36
DESIRED-A fair to poor tennis player
for a few quick sets every now and
then. Call Bill Alterman at The Daily,
764-0552 anytime. DF35
AS -A PSYCH 171 (experiments, SBS
will now be open EVENINGS only-
7:00 to 10:30. (2 hrs. credit). 34F33
DON'T YOU hate to type in the hot
weather? Don't you hate to type any-
time? Let Candy do it. Cheap, pro-
fessional. Call 665-4830. DF34
ANDREW!
We'll have 7 almond toasties, 1 carmel.
3 combination apricot and banana-
one with ketchup, and 37 blurbs
which you can write in your time off.
DF32
Creative Wedding and Portrait Photog-
raphy by a top professional need not
be expensive, if done by RICHARD
LEE. Call 761-9452 before noon, DJtc
Women's
Liberation

____ _
...

NEW VOICES IN AMER-
ICAN STUDIES, edited by Ray
B. Browne, Donald M. Winkel-
man, and Allen Hayman, Pur-
due University Press, $4.75.
By ROBERT CONROW
When a publisher sends out a
book to be reviewed which has
been off the press for four
years, a reviewer's initial re-
sponse may be to see if it was
written by some previously un-
discovered author. A second re-
sponse, if the reviewer is an-
pulsive, might well be to chuck
it out the -window. In receiving
a copy, then, of New Voices in
American Studies, published in
1966 by Browne,. Winkenan
and Hayman, and more.recent-
ly by Purdue Univ. Press, I must
admit that the second alterna-
tive would have seemed appro-
priate had it not been that my
circumstances at the time (rid-
ing on a Boeing 707) made the
necessary action virtually im-
possible. So entrapped, I soon
discovered that the publishers
in this case knew what they
were doing. Much of what the
"new voices" were saying a few
years ago seem equally, if not
more valid today as a result of
our increasing awareness of the
necessary convergence of vari-
ous academic disciplines.
Editor Browne, in the intro-
duction to ,this collection of es-
says, suggests the guiding im-
pulse. According to Browne,
folklore "must chin itself on
the cultures above it," the ob-
vious implication being that
scholars in American Studies
have too long overlooked the
significant achievements made
in folk arts, crafts, and liter-
ature. Instead, they have pre-
ferred the more traditional task
of interpreting and reinterpret-
ing the works of key figures in
American life with what is gen-
erally less insight than mere in-
version of what has gone before.
An examination, then, of the
12 essays included in this vol-
ume, which admittedly vary
widely in scope and intent,
would seem to convey one nain
point: those academicians bound
to the traditional disciplines of
American literature and history
had best either adjust their vis-
ion to a new level or else b
prepared to do a few of the
chinning exercices themselves.
For in spite of the fact that
many of these "new voices" have
a n unfortunate brusqueness
about them, they must, none-
theless, be given credit for dar-
ing to seek new directions while
their colleagues have remained
ensconded in more comfortably-
funded easy chairs.
Ten of the twelve essays in
nis collection are the product '
the first Midwest Conference on
Literature, H i s t o r y, Popular
Culture and Folklore, held at
Purdue in 1965. The purpose of
that conference, as the title
might indicate, was to demon-
strate the need for a closer, but
broader, alliance among the dis-
ciplines comprising American
Studies. Since then there have
been other conferences, each
with the same goal in mind and
each with the same rather di-
versified result. The topics cov-
ered in 1965 ranged from Mark
Twain as art patron to John
Hersey as war correspondent,
and from the origin of the ballad
of "Thomas Rhymer" to the in-
fluence of Western Civilization
on North American Indian mus-
ic. Although a prefatory .ote
advises that the "book as a
whole shows the interrelation
and mutual necessity of the dif-
ferent disciplines," the conjoin-
ing link is at best tenuous and
perhaps impossible to find. Per-
haps it would have been bet-
ter, or at least more honest, if
the editors for the time being
had disregarded the pretense
of unity and rather had stated

forthrightly, "we see the urgency
of our task and although our
talents may still be underdevel-
oped, we shall, nonetheless, take
the liberty of sticking a few pins
in the britches of our colleagues.
in the hopes of uncovering new

Ad hit erto forbidden areas of
scholarship."
An example of one such pin,
brilliantly conceived yet some-
what without significant conse--
quence, is illustrated in Browne's
own essay on ")Popular Theater
in Moby Dick." Browne shows
how Melville combined tradi-
tional Shakespearean theater
forms with the "nonlegitimate"
forms of burlesque, farce, and
Negro minstrel. To Browne's
way of thinking, "Mellville must
have known the popular theater
well. It was everywhere around
him."
To confirm his point, Browne
shows how Pip, often associated
with Lear's fool, may be seen
also as the embodiment of pop-
ular theater humor. In the
doubloon chapter, Pip is heard
saying, "'Here's the ship's navel,
this doubloon here, and they are
on fire to unscrew it. But, un-
screw your navel, and what's
the consequence? Cook! ho,
cook! and cook us!'" Although,
Browne acknowledges that there
may-be some merit to critics
who see this symbolic ;navel as
the center of life and being, he
sees further significance. Using
Melville's own Temarks to sup-

serve to organize and measure
the best of our energies and
skills . ."
Cady wisely admits that his
list of great American chest-
pounders is "neither exhaustive
nor intended to be anything
but suggestive," yet the value
for American Culture scholars
is obvious. By means of his hit
and run approach, Cady has in-
terwoven both literary and polit-
ical events in a pilot study which
offers fertile ground for any
number of further case studies.
Why, for example, to paraphrase
the title of a popular novel, are
we so much more'than political-
ly, or even militarily, in Viet-
nam?
Another pilot study, somewhat
more tightly developed, can be
found in Russel B. Nye's "The
Juvenile Approach to American
Culture, 870-1930." By tracing
the careers of such turn-of-the
century boyhood heroes as
Deadwood Dick, Rattlesnake
Ned and, later, Horatio Alger's
Harry Walton and Dick Whit-
tington, Nye uncovers a liter-
ature which in many respects
is more reflective of the age
than the exploits of, say, an
Isabel Archer or Huck Finn.

r
Jewish
Joshua Trachtenberg, JEW-
ISH MAGIC AND SUPER-
STITION, Atheneum paper-
back edition, $3.25
By RABBI SAMUEL M. STAHL
There is an anecdote about an
actress who, when, asked by a
reporter what her favorite sup-
erstition was, answered, "Thank
God, I have none," - a n d
"knocked wood" as she spoke.
Her action illustrates so amus-
ingly the human tendency-even
am ong the most urbane and
sophisticated-to respond to ex-
pressions of praise with magical
devices, as if to frighten away
evil spirits.
Joshua Trachtenberg, in his
Jewish Magic and Superstition
avers that fear of the super-
natural has produced myriads
of protective magical devices.
Magic has been woven into the
fabric of social usage and has
influenced not only folk habits
but also innumerable religious
rites and ceremonies.
The tradition of Judaism has
not effectively resisted the
mighty impact of superstition.
During the past two millenia, we
witnessed a steady expansion
and development of the inner
core of Judaism. Old religious
concepts were re-interpreted
and new ones were ultimately
integrated in the spiritual life
of the Jew. Outside of this for-
mal evolution' of Jewish belief
and practice, a "folk religious
expression" was emerging - a
composite of doctrines and rit-
uals concerning demons and an-
gels. Although this folk religious
expression never met with the
enthusiastic approval of rab-
binic leaders, its wide-spread
popularity was overwhelming.
Trachtenberg limits the pur-
view of his examination to the
unique elements of Jewish magic
as they unfolded during the
M i d d l e Ages (1000-1600) in
Northern Europe. The distinc-
tive feature of Jewish magic was
the prohibition against recog-
nizing and employing the occult
forces in nature. It depended in
large measure for its success on
invoking the proper spirits and
names.
An interesting observation of
Trachtenberg is the medieval
Jewish preoccupation with the
"evil eye." The eye was thought
to possess certain baneful po-
tencies as natural properties. In
addition, it is a pagan conviction
that that the spirits and gods,
basically man's enemies, envy
his joys and triumphs and ha-
rass him for the felicities they
do not share. Thus to the me-
dieval mind the evil eye repre-
sented the attention of the spirit
world to the least word or ges-
ture of commendation. In order
to counteract the adverse influ-
ence of the evil eye, it became
a fixed custom in Jewish circles
to conclude every laudatory re-
mark with, "May the Lord pro-
tect Thee," or "no evil eye." Any
act which might have aroused
the envy of the evil eye was
executed with caution and trepi-
dation: taking a census or esti-
. . . . , ..E
Following up their publica-
tion in paperback of the com-
plete novels of Hermann Hesse,
Farrar, Straus and Giroux have
just brought out the first edi-
tion in English of a wide selec-
tion of Hesse's poetry. (Noon-
day paperback, $1.75) Editor
and translator James Wright,
an acclaimed poet in his own
right, has slected 79 poems from
some 480 pages of poetry in the
seven-volume German edition
of Hesse's works. The chosen

poems are lyrical and romantic
and may disappoint readers
seeking a poetic counterpart to,
the intellectual discipline of
Magister Ludi or the mystic
searching of Siddhartha. Indeed,
these poems seem to second
George Steiner's verdict of Hes-'
se: "This is not mysticism, it's
incense." Ah, but of a lovely
fragrance.
Penquin has added to their
paperback poetry series two ti-
tles that have been cherished,

....

M

ma
age
din;
ing
day
wer
the
whi
W
evil

Mass Meeting
8 P.M. Sunday
Newman Center
331 THOMPSON
6F32
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS?
VISIT
FOR

SALE
Printed Sheared Terry Kitchen Towels
A4for $3
Regularly 1.25 each. . colorful selection of generous-size
kitchen towels, sheared to a velvety softness on 'one side
and terry-looped on the other. L intfree and a bsorbent, they
make kitchen chores a bree e. Assorted patterns, 16"x30" size.
Shops for the Home-Lower Level
Jcob S

JAc
PERSONAL
FOR SALE:
Keith Jarret's first Jazz album, Dion's
Sit Down old friend, and Biff Rose's
Thorn album. All only playedonce:
I've overspent this month. $2.50 each
or if your tastes are this desperate,
$7.00 for all (big deal). 764-7622. DFtc
ONCE AGAIN! Light or heavy house-
keeping: rates depend on what you
have me do. 764-7622. DFtc
D6NT THROW away money and time
on an amateur. when. you can have
your thing photographed by a pro-
fessional at a reasonable price. Call
Richard Lee at 761-9452 before noon.
PAPERS written and typed, cheap, very
fast. Esp. Eng. 662-6485. 7F35
U-M MALE professional student, emo-
tionally stable, rationally liberal, in-
tested in many things and life in
general-wants to meet mature stable
girl. This ad is placed in' order to
meet new faces, not because I am
hurting! Reply to Mich. Daily, Box
50. 5F33
EXOTIC RECIPES! GOURMET COOK-
ING! and fun to boot-Call ,685-3369
early morning and eve. to sign up
for cooking lessons. DF35
2, 3, AND 4 FOOT black lights w/fiX-
ture, under $16, 18, and $20. 769-208
:or 662-6550. 8F35

port his contention, Browne
notes that earlier in the book
Melville had said "There are
certain queer times and oc-
casions in this strange mixed,
affair we call life when a man
takes his whole universe for a
vast practical joke, though the
wit thereof he but dimly dis-
cerns, and more than suspects
that the joke is at nobody's ex-
pense but his own." This joke,
according to Browne, was a no-
tion Melville had picked up from
common popular theater, name-
ly that if you unscrew your
navel, your rear end will fall off.
So, nice footwork, we may say,
but where does this lead us in
uncovering new areas for ad-
vanced scholarship? Of greater
importance for Americanists are
the essays which deliberately
mark themselves as pilot studies.
In this line, Edwin H. Cady's
"The Strenuous Life as a Them~e
in American Culture," is an ex-
cellent specimen. Cady takes
his title from Theodore Roose-
velt's stated desire 'to "preach
not the doctrine of ignoble ease,
but the doctrine of the strenuous
life, the life of toil and effort,
of labor and strife; to .,reach
that highest form of success
which comes ... to the man who
does not shrink from danger,
hardship, or from bitter toil. .
This theme, according to
Cady, runs the gamut of Amer-
ican culture. It begins with Pil-
grim's journals, is reinforced by
Revolutionary War heroes, is
echoed later by both Emersonian
Transcendentalists and Jack-
sonian Democrats, and ulti-
mately spirals itself into the
"New Frontier" of President
Kenedy. Speaking at Rice Uni-
versity in Texas, President Ken-
nedy declared, in the oft-quoted
phrase, "We choose to go to the
moon in this decade and do them
other things not because they.
are so easy, but because they
are hard, because that goal will'

Nye notes that as the Indian-
killing, and train-robbing vio-
lence of the dime novels began
in the Eighties to lose their
relevance, a new sort of story
began to emerge much more dir-
ectly related to the ideals and
aspirations of a changing Amer-
ican society.
In spite of the false promises
they held, Nye sees the Alger
stories as providing American
youth with something the dime
novels could not offer. In Nye's
words, they provided "an anchor
to tie to in the era of Darwin,
Sumner, Coxey, Donnelly, Spen-
cer, and the other movers and
shakers of contemporary so-
ciety." And today, whether or
not we agree with the rags-to-
riches" philosophy behind these
stories, such motives are, none-
theless a vital aspect of Amer-
ican life which deserves to be
reckoned with on a serious level.
Other essays in this collection
concern themselves with an-
thropological and ethnomusic-
olbgical approaches to American
culture. Bruno Nettl's "Influ-
ences of Western Civilization on
North American Indian Music"
explores the effects of the merg-
ing of Indian and Western vul-
tures on the musical culture of
the Indians, while Americo Par-
edes' "The Anglo-American in
Mexican Folklore" offers itself
as a socio-political analysis of
the North American "gringo" as
subject for Mexican humor.
These essays, taken together,
serve then less as a unifier than
as a springboard for American
studies. For if we acknowledge
the different levels and fre-
quencies at which they are
working, we may see a fresh
kind of energy emerging, which,
if adequately contained, prom-
ises to remove from the cup-
board vital aspects of Americaa
culture previously considered
too "embarrassing" for schol-
arly endeavor.

,
of
tio
bat
Ma
ed
cia:
ron
alli
sou
onl
niv
tor
cou
rest
Jev
ger
wh
the
pur
for'
was
Jev
tivi
ma
mo
,
is t
sub
less
ag
Tri
the
ma
tex
mu
thi
any
seq
aut
en]
and
edi
art
by
Ces
lon
fes
not
Fra
Pos
and
osz
err
for
plig
an
sys

BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims.....
Sutton-Fly.
Trditiona1
Bells . ....
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS .....
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's.
14 Colors)
-Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's........

6.50
6.50
6.98
7.50
2.49
5.50
6.98

Nuv's ... . , 8:50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam's Store

the
ves
is
Am
ver:

1
:.

122 E, Washington

___ . Mr r , ws urw r w' " lowy r ' in .. w r.s s r r w s r r r r rr s r' s f r af. 0 rr , a's". .r. ' w &-f r-0,4 0.

* '.0 - lk - I *kl

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan