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June 19, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-19
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAMNDAILY Friday, June 19, 1970

Friday, June 19, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UP .4 PER CENT:
C .X"
Cost of lving index
Climbs' again in May
WASHINGTON ()--Living costs: creases of five-tenths of one per
rose in May by four-tenths of one cent on a seasonally adjusted
per cent, which a government of- basis, the same as the average for
ficial called a slackening in the the past four months.
nation's worst inflation in 20 years "The rate has come down from
while a labor economist said it "Terthscmed nfrm
was "more of tme same." the sixth-tenths rate of November,
wastanreftheCommisierDecember and January. It has
Assistant Commissioner Joel come down to a five-tenths

t-Popkin 0f tne Bureau 0f Labor
Statistics said price hikes the past
four months represented a signi-
ficant slowing .from the three,
months before that.
But the AFL-CIO's chief econ-
omist, Nathaniel Goldfinger, said
in behalf of the 13.6 million mem-
ber labor federation, "We don't see
an~y clear evidence whatsoever of
a slowing down in the rate of in-
flation," still running at an aq
nual rate of 6 per cent this year
on top of the 6.1 per cent climb
in 1969.
The May rise in prices for food,
clothing, housing, transportation,
medical care and recreation push-
ed the government's Consumer
Price Index up to 134.6.
The figure means that every $10
worth of typical family goods and
services in 1957-59, the base per-
iod for the index, cost $13.46 last
month.
Grocery prices climbed again
after remaining level in April. The
four-tenths May rise and. April's
six-tenths hike in living costs were
both figured by the bureau as in-

--Associated Press

Senators discuss night sessions

Sen. Mike Mansfield (D-Mont), Senate majority leader, listens to Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass)
yesterday as they discuss the Senate's approval to start holding night sessions next week in order
to consider Nixon administration funding bills delayed by the lengthy debate on U.S. policies in
Cambodia. Under the plan, the military sales bill, vehicle for the anti-war Cooper-Church amend-
ment, will be put aside daily at 5 p.m. for four or five hours of other business. The Senate will also
meet two hours ahead of its normal noon startingtime.

RECYCLING CENTER PLANNED:
Drive yields 65

monthly change, which is signifi-
cant," Popkin said.
. But Goldfinger noted the five-
tenths average still amounts to an
annual rate of 6 per cent, higher
than the 5.4 per cent average for
1969 when the worst of the price
spiral began. While averaging out
1969 price increases gave a 5.4 per
cent figure, the price index wound
up 6.1 per cent higher on a De-
cember-to-December basis.
"That's a 6 per 'cent annual
rate," Goldfinger said of Popkin's
report for the past four months.
That's an acceleration of the rate
of increase for the year 1969."
The Nixon administration has
been insisting its policies govern-
ing interest rates, money supply
and federal budget cuts would soon
bring down the rate of inflation,
but the labor federation has
charged they are boosting unem-
ployment to the highest level in
five years without making a dent
in price increases.
The bureau's report said some
45 million rank-and-file workers
gained $1.06 a week to an average
of $118.72 weekly in May, a gain
of four-tenths of one per cent, but
that because of inflation pur-
chasing power was 1.5 per cent
lower than a year earlier.
Consumer services rose five-
tenths of one per cent, smallest
increase since November, but were
still the largest category of price
hikes over the past year.
Popkin said services were up 8
per cent over the year, largely be-
cause of an 11.1 per cent boost for
mortgage interest, a little more
than 10 per cent each for tran-
sportation and for maintenance
and repair costs, and 9.5 per cent
for taxes and insurance-not in-
cluding income taxes.
he
COSM ET ICS
custom matched shades
WIGS
privately fitted
810 Brown
WE SERVICE WIGS

tons 'of bottles

Carmichael
testifies at
hearing
WASHINGTON (P) -=Stokely
Carmichael, once head ofa con-
troversial and militant civil rights
group, invoked the 5th Amend-
ment 47 times in a secret session
of the Senate Internal Security
subcommittee three months ago.
The hearing, conducted by Sen.
Strom Thurmond, (R-SC) was so
secret that at least one subcom-
mittee member, Sen. Birch Bayh,
(D-Ind) complained he had not
heard of it until immediately be-
fore it began.I
Carmichael, who in recent
months has lived mainly in Africa
testified he did not know who was
responsible for the recent wave of
bombings of public buildings, that
he knew no Puerto Rican "ter-
rorists" who might be implicated
in the bombings or other acts and
that he knew no persons who
could be labeled "conspirators."
He refused to answer most
other questions which centered
around his trips to Puerto Rico,
Cuba, Communist China and
North Vietnam.
The transcript of the March 25
session of the subcommittee,
which, among other things is in-
quiring into alleged Communist
links with American civi rights
groups, was released today.
Under questioning by J. G.
S o u r w i n e, the subcommittee's
chief counsel, Carmichael said he
had been out of the United States
for 14 months and had no first
hand knowledge of events here.
"I do not know who is respon-
sible for the bombing or what their
grievances are," he said at one
point.
"However, I could say historical-
ly, though, that as long as there
is injustice I am sure people will
find ways to demonstrate their
grievances."
"If people are really concerned
about stopping violence," he said,
"they should stop injustice. And if
justice were assured I am sure
violence would stop."
Carmichael invoked his 5th
Amendment constitutional right
against self incrimination to
avoidnanswering a wide variety
of questions posed by Sourwine.
He pleaded the 5th Amendment
when asked if he had connections
with the Fair Play for Cuba Com-
miteee, or had ever known of an
attempt by the Communist Party.
USA, to infiltrate the Student
Non-Violent Coordinating Com-
mittee (SNCC) -of which he was
once chairman.
He also refused to say if he had
ever met personally with Cuban
premier Fidel Castro, had signed
a pact of alliance with the In-
dependence Movement of Puerto
Rico, had ever become a member
of the Cuban armed forces, or
had ever urged black Americans
to bomb the ghettos.
Carmichael did not use the self-
incrimination protection a few
times and when asked by Sourwine
if he knew of any secret arms
stockpiles in the United States re-
plied: "I don't know anything
about that so it would be impos-
sible for me to give you any in-
formation."
RENT A TV
AIR CONDITIONER
Special Studet Rates
Short or onq Term

Shakespeare
t

e
n
b
e
k

0
F
MERCHANT OF VENICE

I
C
E

bigotry, greed and romantic love
in a subtle and complex blend of
high drama and delightful comedy

MICH IGAN
REPERTORY

s typlayersmichigonrepertory7ouniversityplayersmichiganreper tory70universityplayersmichigon
THE UNIVERSITY PLAYERS

A
N
D
M
E
N

In Re
July

-present-.

a disturbing, prophetic story of America
in crisis and'the harvest of shame reaped
by men disowned by their society '

I
I

ENACT announced yesterday
that its two-day drive to h'lp re-
cycle the country's natural re-
sources and to clean up the areas
non-returnable bottle pollution
has netted over 65 tons of glass.
Over one-half million bottles
were collected in the drive, for
which an Ohio glass manufactur-
ing company paid contributors 1
cent per pound. The glass was

crushed and sent in three fully-
loaded tractor trailer trucks to the
firms Charlotte, Michigan plant
where it will either be remelted to
make new bottles or mixed with
asphalt to make a durable paving
material.
The program was so successful,
ENACT leaders sr y, that the
Owen-Illinois Company, the glass
manufacturing firm, has agreed to

Campus unrest listed
as biggest problem

Campus unrest is regarded by
Americans as the country's lead-
ing problem, according to a recent
Gallup poll.
Until now, campus unrest has
not ranked higher that fifth on
a list of the most important prob-
lems that plague this country.
But according to the latest poll,
campus unrest was ahead of the
war in Southeast Asia, other in-
ternational crises, racial strife,
the high cost of living and many
other problems.
The survey was taken during
May 22 and May 25 when 1,509
adults were interviewed in more
than 300 localities across the
country.
Campus unrest was listed as the
leading problem by 27 per cent of
those polled. The fighting in
Southeast Asia was second by 22
per cent. Third was other inter-
national problems, named by 14
per cent.
A survey that was taken in
January on the leading problems
indicated that the war in Indo-
china was listed as the most im-
portant followed by the high cost
of living and racial strife.
The poll also reported that
many of the college alumni polled

believed that college administra-
tions failed to give the same im-
portance to conservative leaders
as they did of those of liberal
leaders. Of the alumni polled, 45
per cent agreed with that view-
point, 39 per cent disagreed and
16 per cent had no opinion.
Belief that faculties failed to
give equal weight to the two polit-
ical viewpoints was found to a
greater extent in Eastern and
Western states, the poll reported,
than in Southern and Midwestern
states.
The findings on those view-
points were based on replies of
college-educated individuals who
took part in the survey on the
nation's leading problems. They
constituted 24 per cent of those
who participated in that survey.

set up a permanent collection
point in the city to aid in the re-
cycling of glass as well as alum-
inum cans, paper and scrap metal.
The new collection point will be
open eight hours a day and will be
staffed by full-time workers and
ENACT volunteers. It will be
operated on a drive-in basis, and
contributors willrbe able to make
a quick exchange of glass for
money on the premises.
Carol Muscara, who served as
ENACT co-ordinator of the glass
collection project, said that the
center will be located at the corn-
er of Detroit and Kingsly Streets,
across from the ENACT's Ecology
Center. The company, she said,
has agreed to pay the rent for the
center and will continue to pay
contributors for their glass or
other reusable refuse.
In discussing the purpose of the
glass-drive, William Kopper, Di-
rector of the Ecology Center, said
"We're primarily concerned with
the attitude of people toward
our natural resources.
He reiterated ENACT's opposi-
tion to the production of ao-de-
posit, no-return bottles but added,j
"We recognize and publicly en-
courage the recycling and wise use
of our raw -ateriars wherever pos-
sible."
He said, "We can no longer con-
tinue to live in a 'throw ,y
world' where our natural rent^"ces

go on a one-way trip from the
land to our air, water, and dumps."
The thousands of pounds of
glass were brought to a tempo-ary
weigh station in the Arborland
shopping center Tuesday and
Wednesday.
Churches, neighborhood groups,
scouts and individuals concerned
about environmental prr o b 1 e m s
participated in the project. The
largest single redemption was
2 935 pounds of glass collected by
the Methodist Youth Fellowship in
New Hudson, Michigan.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

porson kanin
BORN YESTERDAY
a rough diamond is polished
too well, and the process is hilarious
peter nichols
JOE EGG
highly acclaimed in London and New York,
this recent play examines a troubled marriage
and a retarded child in a moving, humorous
and totally surprising way

BOX OFFICE OPENS
MONDAY, JUNE 22

Aug

July 28--Ai

Season Tickets Only
June 22-30

Individual Tick
Beginning Jul)

I

PRICES: (SEASON SUBSC
Season Subscriptions:
Individual Tickets:

RIPTIONS OFFER SAVINGS AND PREFERRED LOCATIONS)

REGULAR:
WEEKEND:
MIXED:

(Tues., Wed., Thurs.)-$6.50, $5.00
(Fri.-Sat.)-$8.50, $7.00
(weekdays and weekends mixed) -add
50c for each Friday or Saturday ticket
ordered to regular price above.

TUES., WED., THURS.-$2.00, $1.50
FRI., SAT.-$2.50, $2.00

WWI

Sony Model 20
Makes Driving a Pleasure

Note: The higher priced tickets are the first 17 rows of orchestra and first 4 rows of balcc
ALL PERFORMANCES IN THE AIR CONDITIONED LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRI
CURTAIN: 8:00 P.M. SHARP!
Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
July 14-18 - JI4 MER._ J15MICE J 16 MER. J17 MICE
July 21-25 J21 MICE J22 MEk. J23 MICE J24 MER.
July 28-Aug. 1 J28 BORN J29 BORN J30 BORN J31 BORN
Aug. 4-8 A4 EGG A5 EGG A6 EGG A7 EGG I
SEASON SUBSCRIBERS PLEASE NOTE: By ordering the same day for all four wee
cally see all four plays.

I

Easy,
Easy

to Operate-
on Your Purse

I

U-N Barber Shop
8:30-5:15 P.M.
Monday-Saturday.
Michigan Union

HI-Fl BUYS
ANN ARBOR-EAST LANSING.
618 S. Moir 7694700
"d Ity n n T~arh f~,itirfr tsr rI ,,.J

Box Office Hours:
June22-July 10
12:30-5:00, Mon.-Fri.
Closed July 3, 4, 5

July 13-Aug.
12:30-8:00, pe

"GT

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