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June 17, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-17
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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DALLY

Wednesday, June 17, 1970

Wednesday, June 17, 1970

GUIDELINES SET: .

CAMBODIA CAPTIVES:
Communists release

Status of

C. O. defined

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

1-1
i
i

WASHINGTON (A -- If you.
are sincerely opposed to all
war after a diligent study of
the subject, you can qualify
for exemption from militaryt
service as a conscientious ob-
jector, Draft Director Curtis
W. Tarr said yesterday.
Tarr outlined, in a news con-
ference, the new definition of
conscientious objection as hedin-
terpreted a Supreme Court deci-t
sion issued Monday. He said he
would send draft boards a new
set of guidelines in the next few,
days.
At the sametime, Tarr an-
nounced the three more draft de-;
velopments:
-A new lottery on July 1 to
assign draft Sequence numbers to
men reaching age 19 during 1970.
S --An executive order allowing
the drafting of men who have
failed to take a pre-induction
physical.
A directive, implementing a sec-
ond Supreme Court decision Mon-
day, requiring local draft boards'
to reopen a registrant's classifica-
tion record upon presentation of
new evidence. Previously reopen-
ing the record was at the board's
discretion.

three U.S.
SAIGON (P) - Three Ameri-
can correspondents, captured
May 7 by Communist troops in I
Cambodia, were back in Saigon <
yesterday, apparently in good l
shape after being freed by their
captors.j
"We're safe and healthy," l
said Richard B. Dudman of the I
St. Louis Post-Dispatch who wasI
released with Elizabeth Pond of.
the Christian Science Monitor I
and Michael D. Morrow of Dis-
patch Inc.
They were released in Cam-
bodia on Monday night and ar-
rived in Saigon early yesterday
after hitchhiking a ride with a
South Vietnamese convoy re-
turning from Phnom Penh. E
In a telephone interview from+
M i ss Pond'snapartment, Dud- l
man said interrogators told
them after their capture that ;
they had at first been suspected;
of being U.S. governments per- I
sonnel or possibly agents of theI
Central Intelligence Agency.
Apparently as a result, Dud-
man, 52, said he and Morrow,
24, were blindfolded the day of
their capture, forced to r u n
about half a mile behind a mo-
torbike, then knocked to t h e I
ground and left in a darkened I
room with their hands tied.

-Associated Press
Agnew target "won't resign"
John Rhodes Jr., a 22-year-old member of President Nixon's
commission on Campus Unrest, tells new reporters in Cambridge
yesterday, he has no intention of resigning despite Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew's statemest that he should. Agnew's denunciation
was in response to Rhodes' comment, "If statements by the Presi-
dent and vice president are killing people, I want to know that."
POLL TAKEN
French feel US

newsmen
However, they were treated
"with kindness and considera-
tion," Dudman added, once their
credentials as correspondents
had been established.
In- Washington, a spokesman
for Secretary of State William
P. Rogers said, "We hope this
release will be followed by the
release of other American and
international journalists cap-
tured in Cambodia in recent
weeks."
The release of the trio left
some 20 correspondents f r o m
eight nations dead or missing
in Cambodia.
Dudman, Morrow and Miss
Pond were captured at the east-
ern edge of the Cambodian pro-
vincial capital of Svay Rieng, 72
miles southeast of Phnom Penh,
in a car they had driven from
Saigon. Dudman said in a
statement prepared by the three
that they were freed Monday
night "at about 11 o'clock in
Cambodia on a stretch of High-
way 1" between Saigon a n d
Phnom Penh.
The statement carefully avoid-
ed any mention of North Viet-
namese or Viet Cong troops in
Cambodia, apparently in hopes
that this might improve t h e
chances of other captive news-
men.
The statement made no men-
tion of the t r i o seeing any
North Vietnamese or Viet Cong.
In a dispatch to his paper,
Dudman said the trio was cap-
tured when they "inadvertently
entered an area controlled by
the revolutionary front" as they
drove through an area of Cam-
bodia "to observe the depth of
penetration into Cambodia by
the American and South Viet-
namese forces."
The statement said the cor-
respondents were "asked to
make statements about their ex-
perience, presumably for later
broadcast by Radio Hanoi, but
none that conflicted with their
own views."
It did n o t specify whether
any statement was m a d e to
their captors.

THE HOUSE refused to take up the Nixon administration's
version of a sweeping postal reform-pay raise bill yesterday and
went on to debate its own postal bill which would turn mail opera-
tions over to an independent postal service.
The administration bill, negotiated with postal unions in the wake
of the mail strike last March. would have effected an mail reform and
an eight per cent pay boost for mailmen.
The bill now before the House would turn mail operations over
to an independent U.S. Postal Service with corporate powers to put
them on a self-paying basis by 1978, and make the 8 per cent pay boost
retroactive to April 18.
The final vote is expected today or tomorrow.
* * *
NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION HEAD told Con-
gress yesterday "in the vast majority of cases integration is being
circumvented" in Southern schools.
George D. Fischer, NEA chief, said private schools are being
started for whites at a rapid pace and are getting buildings, books and
buses either free or at cut rates from white officials in charge of public
tax-supported schools. He said such conduct is clearly unconstitutional.
Sen. Walter Mondale (D-Minn) said specific protections must
be written into the Nixon administration's plan to funnel $1.5 billion
into Southern desegregation situtations to prevent the money from
being siphoned off to private schools.
* * *
A VETERAN REPUBLICAN SENATOR threatened to resign
yesterday unless some way is found to end the marathon debate
on U.S. policy in Cambodia and pass a $4.5 billion education ap-
propriation bill.
"If the White House wants this debate to go on interminably,
nobody has told me," Sen. Norris Cotton (R-NH) said in complaining
of the controversy over the Cooper-Church amendment to restrict
future military actions in Cambodia.
Cotton said it is vital that the education appropriation bill be
disposed of promptly so that school officials will know how much
federal aid they can expect in the coming school year.
He vowed "to make myself a perpetual nuisance on this" until
the Senate leadership agrees to bring the money measure up for
action "or I am going to resign as a senator."
NOON SPEECH TODAY-

-uaily-Sara ruiwicn
ENACT worker dumps bottles after weighing

ENACT

collects

no-return bottles
By LINDSAY CHANEY
A bottle collecting campaign sponsored by ENACT and Owens-
Illinois emphasizes the need to recycle waste products, specifically
glass, in the fight to preserve the environment.
At the glass collection station, located at Arborland Shopping
Center, consumers are paid one cent per pound for the glass they
bring in.,
Owens-Illinois will use the crushed glass, known as "cullet," in
their glass-making processes. All glass is made of about 20 per cent
cullet, the rest being sand, limestone and other ingredients.
Toby Cooper, Grad, an ENACT leader, said some people have
brought in up to 600 lbs. of glass. Over 30,000 lbs. were collected by
yesterday afternoon.
"Every time someone brings in glass, it represents an attitude
change." said Cooper. "It means

Regents to
hear ENACT
Representatives of E n v i r o n-
mental Action for Survival
ENACT) will meet with the Re-
gents tomorrow to discuss EN-
ACT's proposal for the establish-
ment of an advisory committee on
the relationship between the Uni-
versity and the corporations in
which it invests.
The proposal will be presented
at the Regents monthly open hear-
ing, scheduled for 4 p.m. In the
Regents Room, on the first floor
of the Administration Bldg.
Members of the Gay Liberation
Front (GLF) plan to demonstrate
at the open hearing in protest of
President Robben Fleming's deci-
sion not to allow a midwest con-
ference on homosexuality to be
held at the University. (See story,
Page 3).
Although it had been expected
that part of the hearing would
deal with the dispute over pro-
posals for increased student con-
trol of the Office of Student Af-
fairs, the heads of Student Gov-
ernment Council and the Senate
Advisory Committee on University
Affairs (SACUA), the top faculty
body, said yesterday they were not
ready to bring their proposal to
the Regents.
The proposal calls for the es-
tablishment of a student-domi-
nated policy board of OSA, which
would administer the office to the
extent that the vice president in
charge of OSA was willing to
allow. SGC has stated it would
accept such a plan, provided that
President Fleming appoints a vice
president who would adhere to
the decisions of the policy board.

that people are thinking about
what they can do to maintain the
environment instead of just how
to use it."
When people drive up to the
station, they put their glass -
mostly no-deposit, no-return bot-
tles - on a scale. An ENACT
worker then fills out a slip which
says how much the glass is worth,
and the person receives his money
from the cashier's booth, located
about 30 feet away. People may
also donate their glass money to
ENACT.
S a m Allen, a press relations
representative , for Owens-Illinois
explained that the company pres-
ently has glass recycling opera-
tions in their factory towns so
people who live in the town can
bring their glass bottles to the
factory and be paid for it. How-
ever, the program in Ann Arbor is
the first attempt to reclaim glass
outside of factory towns.
"We're doing this project," said
Allen, "to demonstrate that a
modern system of waste collection
is needed."
ENACT and Owens-Illinois will
establish a permanent glass col-
lection center in Ann Arbor, on
an experimental basis, by the end
of July. Plans for this center are
still incomplete.
- -- . - .

rarr said Monday's court deci-
sion meant that the required "re-
ligious training" allowed as a basis
for objection need not be religious
in the conventional sense.
What was left, Tarr said, were
these four guideli' to be sent
to local draft boards after they are
written in final form:
"The man's belief must be sin-
cere.
-"The man must be opposed
to war in all forms. This decision
does not open the door to exemp-
tion or opposition to a particular
war.
-"It must be something more
than a personal moral code. He
needs to have taken into account
the thoughts of other wise men;
he needs to have consulted some
system of belief.
-"His belief needs to be the
result of some rigorous kind of
training."
In the first such lottery last
December, men who were between
19 and 26 years old by the end of
1969 received permanent draft se-
quence numbers. On July 1, num-
bers will be assigned only to men
who reach the age of 19 during
1970; they will become the primary
draft pool in 1971.
Tarr said President Nixon sign-
ed an executive order yesterday
to close a loophole in draft reg-
ulations. Previously, he explained,
a man could not be inducted into
military service until he took a
pre-induction physical examina-
tion. U.S. attorneys, however, were
reluctant to prosecute for failure
to report for this physical-a re-
latively minor infraction on which
judges tended to be lenient, Tarr
said.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 704-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
.gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

heading t'
LONDON A')-One out of two
Frenchmen believes that U.S.
foreign policy is likely to provoke
World War III, according to a
recent poll.
Published by-the magazine
Paris Match, the poll stated that
one in three Frenchmen believes
Soviet foreign policy is likely to
lead to a global conflagration.
Of the 1,000 Frecnh men and
women over 21 questioned in
May, 43 per cent thought that
the Soviet Union was working
more for peace than for war,
while 26 per cent thought that
of the United States.
Looking at American reaction
to President Nixon's moves in
Indochina, Alistair Cooke of the
British Broadcasting Corp., ob-
served: "It is strange but true
that in spite of all you hear
about the American people being

in a paroxysm of rage against
the war, President Nixon has
well over 60 per cent of the
country believing that he is
doing a good job.
"This is as high a percent-
age of public backing as Ken-
nedy or Eisenhower had in all
their early honeymoon days in
the presidency," the veteran
British observer of America
said.
"So when the President de-
cided he had to go into Cam-
bodia he knew - what y o u
would never gather from the
radical and liberal press - that
most people were prepared to
trust him.
Italia Cronache, the monthly
publication of Italy's Christian
Democratic youth movement,
attacked the Cambodian opera-
tion as "a slap at peace."

Heavy Duty Steering
and Suspension Parts
* BALL JOINTS
* IDLER ARMS
* TIE ROD ENDS

Nixon to create unit

to publicize.inflactionf
WASHINGTON (4) - Presi- have no power to roll back, wage
dent Nixon will announce plans or price increases, the govern-
for a watchdog committee which ment is betting that unions and
will publicize inflationary price business will reduce their de-
increases, h i g h administration mands rather than be publicly
sources said yesterday. accused of adding to the worst
The sources indicated the inflation since the Korean War.
President will announce the An outspoken advocate of di-
committee during his economic rect wage and price controls,
message to the nation scheduled Harvard economist John Ken-
for noon today. The speech will neth Galbraith, yesterday rec-
be carried on radio and televi- ommended a six-month freeze
sion. on prices and wages in certain
Although the g r o u p would sectors of the economy.I

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Program Information

ENDS TONIGHT
"A MAN
CALLED HORSE"
Shows at: 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

Daily OfficialB, caseworker, BA in social science and
ll B lletn (related areas.
-- Wheeler-Van Label Company, Grand
Wednesday, June 17 Rapids. Mgt. positions, BA, graphic
arts courses helpful.
. Federal Trade Comm., several open-
eneralNotces ings for consumer protection special-
ists public relations and gen. com-
Summer Piano Series Ushers: work.
A number of ushers are still needed f
for the Summer Piano Concert Series,
to be presented by the University Mu-
sical Society during month of July in
Racktham Aud. Sign up for these po- _ ait
sitions at Box Office of Hill Aud.,e
Thurs.. June 18, 7 p.m. See Mr. Warn- -_.ice kw

STARTS
TOMO RROW

Ending Wednesday

Galbraith's recommendations
were made in a hearing before
the House Banking Committee.
Chairman Wright Patman (D-
Tex.), has already introduced
legislation to give President Nix-
on standby authority for an
eight-month freeze.

er.

P1(1cent1iWtlSer vice
General Division
3200 S.A.B.
For further information call 764-7460:
Mid Michigan Home, nursing home
administrator needed, MBA, MA Hosp.
Admin., Pub. Health or Social Wit.
Probate Ct. Juvenile Div., Hillsdale,

IF

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Matinees
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NOW OPEN
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7:0-10:30
many nice books
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761-0700
Open doytime beginnincj
June 22nd

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JEAN SEBERG- JACQUELINE BISSET * GEORGE KENNEDY
,ELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLiN -MAUREEN STAPLETON
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Mon.-Thurs. Fri.-Sat. All Day
Eves. Eves. Sunday
$2.25 $2.50- $2.25
Matinees Monday thru Saturday $1.75

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