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June 10, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-06-10
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~4t£ft$9nt ait
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michiqon Doily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10, 1970-News Phone: 764-0552
NIGHT EDITOR: ROB BIER
Fleming: A second chance
WILL THE GAY LIBERATION FRONT (GLF) ever fade
away. Poor President Fleming has asked them twice
not to bother him with their request to hold a Midwest
conference on homosexuality at the University, and now
they're back again. This time though, their demand has
the added support of SGC.
After Gay Liberation was first refused University fa-
cilities in April, they - joined by several other student
groups and some faculty members - picketed the Presi-
dential tea where one Regent expressed sympathy for,
and agreement with the legitimacy of the group's re-
quest, but confided, "The time is bad - the state legis-
lature is fed up with all the BAM demands. Why don't
you just wait a while .."
FLEMING TOO expressed sympathy for GLF, but you
know how alumni would feel about all those homo-
sexuals running around - and all in one place. Fleming
responded to gay liberation's request, not directly, but
through a letter to Barbara Newell, acting vice president
for student affairs.
In the letter, Fleming stated that any conference on
homosexualiy should be "clearly educational in nature,"
and that the Midwest conference did not meet that cri-
teria. But, in their letter to Fleming, the group had specif-
ically stated that the Midwest conference would offer
workshops, public lectures and panel discussions by "such
outside specialists as jurists, doctors and religious lead-
ers," who would speak to the public-at-large on legal,
medical and religious aspects of homosexuality. Not only
would the conference be educational to homosexuals, but,
more importantly, it would also educate those who know
gay people through the one-sided stereotypes of books and
films as well as through their own deep personal preju-
AFTER REFUSING them University facilities, Fleming
threw gay liberation a crumb - he allowed them to
sponsor a dance at the Michigan Union. The dance is of a
purely social nature, and certainly not "educational" nor
under observation by professionals. As GLF member Gen-
ie Linzer says, "It's a dilema to me what's in Fleming's
head. You'd think he would prefer us holding a conference
than having us dance together."
Obviously then, Fleming is acting from a fear of out-
side legislative pressure. No doubt the fear is a valid one,
for many people are uptight about homosexuality. But the
University should not participate nor condone the repres-
sion of any group, especially one peacefully struggling
against prejudice and discrimination. By refusing gay
liberation the conference, Fleming is extending society's
repression and tacitly approving of it.
President Fleming obviously has no base for his argu-
ments.
If he has no firm grounds for objections, he should
stop being an obstacle and allow the GLF conference to
be held at the University.
-HESTER PULLING

Wednesday, June 10, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

cinema
Tarzan wears a headdress

Wednesday, June 10, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

For DirectClassified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
Monday through Friday, 12:00-2:00

By DONALD KUBIT
A Man Called Horse is an Indian
version of Tarzan. The tale is
supposedly history, but the pro-
ducer's attempt to humanize the
circumstances distorts the impact
of the film and leaves it with a
faint smell of hockey melodrama.
An English lord (Richard Hor-
ris) denounces his heritage and
travels to 1820 America to shoot
grouse. His experience is mainly a
distraction from elite boredom un-
til he is captured by Indians and
treated like an animal. Realizing
his only hope of escaping. from
this hell is to prove his valor, he
accustoms himself with the Indian
way of life.
His only communication with
the other members of the tribe
is through an interpretor, who he
discovers is a fellow prisoner that
speaks not only the native tongue,
but French and English as well;
verifying the theory that a tri-
langual Indian is a definite asset
to any Indian movie.
Our hero quickly adjusts to the
customs of his new family and
proves his worthiness by killing
two trespassing Shoshone-scalp-
ing one of them-and is accepted
into the clan. Although he is a
peace-loving man at heart, his
Noble Savage actions are not at-
tributed to madness, but rather
to his ulterior motive of some day
gaining his freedom.
He asks for the chief's sister's
hand in marriage and is granted
this privilege if he can pass the
final test of true warriors-the
Vow to the Sun, a ritual that is so
gruesome that it was later banned
by the federal government. I will

not spoil the fascination for those
with a masochistic mind by de-
scribing this ceremony, since it is
the big moment of the movie, but
believe me, it is torture you,
wouldn't even wish on your big-
gest enemies.
Of course, he suffers through it
and is offered the hand of the
young squaw. Considering the pain
he has endured, a more just re-
ward seems in order than some
evening bliss in a teepee with a
virgin.
A Shoshone attack is the cat-
alyst for the white man to be on
his way, as the plundering takes
his pregnant's wife's life, and al-
lows him to display his military
training by lining up two rows of
archers and having them fire con-
secutively until the charging vil-
Hans are repelled.
What we learn from this film
is that being an Indian is tough
business, it entails getting your
body scarred, and showing emotion
only when your wife, who you

can't communicate with anyway,
dies. If the idea behind this film
was to show man in another cul-
ture and how he can learn from
-that experience, the result is un-
satisfying. For the character ad-
mits that the tribe is Just as mean
as vicious as all the other people
in the world and as for taboos and
rituals, the Indians definitely have
the market on them.
Save for some beautiful photo-
graphy of unpolluted America and
the performance by Dame Judith
Anderson as an ancient squaw,
A Man Called Horse is nothing
more than Tarzan with a head-
dress. Had the hero stayed in his
new environment, I would be
kinder in my evaluation, but be-
cause he considers it better to re-
turn to his buckskins, I will con-
sider the movie, like his experi-
ence, a momentarykoccurrence. If
mediocre is a valid adjective for
the movie you see when there is
nothing else to do, A Man Called
Horse is a mediocre film.

UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES

LINES 1 day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1.55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2.40
10 2.60
INCHES
1 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 s0.70

2 days
1.60
2..15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4.95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35
21.10

3 days
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55
31.40

4 days
3.00
4.05
4 05
4 65
6.35
7.20
7.90
8.70
9.30
9.30
17.85
25.50
33 45
41.40

5 days
3.65
4.85
5.90
6.90
7.85
8.85
9 75
10.65
11.35
11.35
21.75
31.15
40.95
51.15

6 days
4.20
5.65
6.90
8.05
9.25
10.40
1 1.45
12.60
13.60
13.30
25.40
36.65
48.30
60.50

odd.
.60
.80
.95
1.15
1.30
1.45
1.55
1.70
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.30

FOR SALE
SALE AT 515 Orchard Hill. corner of
Geddes, WED.. art. clothes, things
cheap. 36B25#
FOR SALE-Kodak 35 mm camera, Air-I
quipt 450 slide projector, AM-FM!
clock radio, all in excellent condition.
Call Adnan, 764-6488 or 769-3303. 37B28
AIR CONDITIONER, 8,000 B.T.U., 115
volts, flush window mounting, used
two summers. $175. After 6:00 p.m.
483-0145. 32B28
BRASS DOUBLE BED, etching, strip-
ped, side poles. $60. Spindle double
bed, side polies, walnut finish, $50.
663-8835. 33B261
ARMCHAIR, $12; Moby desk, $10; yel-
low table and 4 aqua chairs, $15-
etc., etc. Call 761-6844. 34B25_
DOUBLE BOX SPRING and mattress
and frame, very firm, $60. Call 761-
6844. 35B26
ARCHITECTS-ENGINEERS
30x42 Mayline drafting table with bar.
Hardly used. $150 when new. Stool
included $45 or best offer. Call 764-
0510. 31B25
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
FOR SALE-SPINET PIANO
Wanted, responsible party to take over
low monthly payments on a spinet1
piano. Can be seen locally, Write
Credit Manager, P.O. Box 276, Shelby-
viller, Indiana. 48X32

LOST - Antique gold wedding band
with "~Myrtle" inscribed on inside.
Left in 1st floor washroom of SAB,
Sunday, May 17th. Call 761-8865. 50A27
LOST - Silver rim prescription sun-
glasses w 'grey lenses. about 3 weeks
ago. Please call 663-3153. 48A26
USED CARS
'66 MUSTANG 2 plus 2. FM, other acces.
Call 761-1916. 36N30
'64 VW, Green - Excellent condition.
Asking $600. Call 769-0043. 37N30
PORSCHE 912. AM-FM short wave
radio, 1966, 5 speed, good condition,
$2985. Call Flint, 234-2006 after 6 p.m.
38N28
1969 MGB-Excellent condition. 11,000
miles. Call Jim Beck, 761-1907. 35N29
'62 FALCON-Runs well. $75. Call 761-
1922 eves. N27

LOST AND FOUND

Additional costs per dova fter six days.
Ads that are 1/, 212 312, etc. inch size will be billed at the
average -of the lower and higher inch rate.

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WANTED TO RENT

Letters to the Editor

Heroes
To the Editor:
THIS LETTER is in response
to D a v e Chudwin's editorial
(Daily, June 2). Chudwin makes
reference to ex-ring champ Mu-
hammad Ali (Cassius Clay) being
"a member of a racist organiza-
tion which preaches hatred to-
ward whites."

Chudwin is obviously referring
to the Nation of Islam, which does
not preach "hatred t o w a r d s
whites." However, its leader, The
Honorable E l i j a h Muhammad,
points out that our white control-
led "system" or establishment is
infested with corruption and im-
-morality.
Chudwin in h i s article men-
tions a few of the symptoms of
this wicked system.
Surely no one can blame Mu-
hammad Ali and other black men
for joining hands so that they
may pull themselves free f r o m
this quagmire of inhumanity,
which is polluted with hatred.
The distorted image of "preach-
ing hate" is the result of the prop-
aganda of the white controlled
press. The same news media that
misled this nation by telling lies
about the situation in Viet Nam.
And the same news media that
profits by publicizing the private
antics of the athletes whom
Chudwin finds "difficult to look
up to."
I am certain Chudwin can find
only a few if any "heroes" in the
news racket.
-Edward Truitt
June 3
Letters to the Editor should 1
be mailed to the Editorial Di-
rector- or delivered to Mary
Rafferty in the Student Pub-
lications business office in the
Michigan Daily building. Let-
ters should be typed, double-
spaced and normally should not
exceed 250 words. The Editorial
Directors reserve the right to
edit all letters submitted.

MARRIED COUPLE seeking furnished
apt. end of Aug.-Dec. Call collect eve-
nings, 341-8958. 6L28
BUSINESS SERVICES
PIANO TEACHER - 10 yr. piano stu-
dent, studied with student of Arthur
Friedheim, will drive to your home.
769-5428, ask for Jim Tucker. 19J27
BABYSITTING Mon.-Thurs. at our
house. Parks and crafts. Call 663-0729.
20J26
Creative Wedding and Portrait Photog-
raphy by a top professional need not
be expensive, if done by RICHARD
LEE. Call 761-9452 before noon. DJtc
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER, 25 yrs.
old. Available anytime. Call Lynn,
663-2348. J28
TYPING - Cheap, professional. Quick
service. Cali Candy at 665-4830 after
noon. J2?

SUMMER SUBLET
SPACIOUS SINGLE room in cool, old
house for July and August; $40; util-
ities paid; 11 blocks from SAB on
South Division. Call 761-8137 or The
Daily, 764-0552 and leave a message
for Anita. DU30
SUBLET July-August, modern A/C
penthouse, 515 Lawrence, No. 8. 761-
5121. 16U32
SUBLET FURN. EFF. ,July-Aug. CHEAP.
Phone 761-6885. 17U28
FEMALE WANTED for large 2-man
apt. Excellent location, inexpensive
for July-Aug. Call 663-5993. 18U28
ONE BDRM. in house, June 21-Aug.,
guy/girl. 662-4049. 19U28
GIRL to complete 4-man for summer
term. Lots of windows; $30-35 a mo.
Cali 662-7032 eves., 520 Packard. 20U25
ROOM FOR RENT. Spacious, great lo-
cation, cooking facilities. Rent negot.
I MUST move, summer term. Call
Russ, 761-4089. 49U24
AIR-CONDITIONED STEAL - July-

'67 OLDSr442-New engine, almost en-
tirely rebuilt. Ex~cellent condition.
769-4289. NDd
PERSONAL
TO THE GIRLS who sublet apt, at
1026 Vaughn last week-Pleasecall
Marilyn back, she lost your names
and phone number. DF27
BROWSE in drafty comfort-we'll keep
the front and back doors open. SBS
will now be open EVENINGS only-
'7:00 to 10:30. 38F33
SOVIET UNION. Driving and Camping.
10 weeks, $1350. Includes air and all
expenses. A, Lipson, 2 Garden Terr,
Cambridge, Mass. 02138 or call (col-
lect) 617-547-1127. 40F36
TO-Upper and downer users who may
wonder if it's a bummer. Any age.
Also recovered users. Let's rap. Call
Larry, 663-2121 after 10 p.m. 37F30
TO AVOID the blistered noonday tripes
-Student Book Service will now be
open EVENINGS from 7:00 to 10:30.
40F33,

FENDER Jazz bass, 1 mo., hard case,
$320. 761-0986. 44X25
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Acoustic, electric instruments, acces-
sories, David lessons-repairs, Gibson.
Harmony. 209 S. State. 665-8001. 10-7
p m. X
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Medium sized Siamese cat. Vic.
Fifth Ave. and Liberty. Tomcat, non-
pure blood seal point. Reward. 761-
5970 or write J. Sturm, 303 S. Divi-
sion. DA27
FOUND - Full grown black and white
springer, male, dig it? 665-2169. DA27
LOST -Woman's ring of sentimental
value, on S. Univ., June 5. Has 5 blue
and white stones. 769-3065. REWARD.
49A28
FOUND- Tiger kitten, about 3 mo. old,
white mittens, brown spot by left
nostril. Inquire eves. 764-1104. DA27

i
i
I
c

CLASSICAL GUITAR LESSONS
Call 769-2406

EXPERIENCED Figure model
work. Call Cheri, 761-1003.

needs
35F28

18J25 Aug. 2 blocks from campus. 761-1548.
12U25
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires -.- -
work in her home. Thesis, technical MODERN 2-man air-cond. apt. Avail-'
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric. able now thru August. Call 663-2718.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc 13U26
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ- JULY-AUG. SUBLET. Solid, furn. 11t-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM rm. eff., free parking. Rent negoti-
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291. 42Jtc able. Write or visit 630 Packard, Apt.
4. DU28
NOW ON CAMPUS SUBLET-Available July 1st-Efficiency
Campus MultiService apt., suitable for 1 or 2. Small but
comfortable and cheap. 906 Packard.
PRIN G 665-2125. 14U28
THESIS SERVICE SUBLET-July 1-Aug. 31-Modern air-
Fast, Dependable, Low-Priced cond. 1 BDRM. 2 blks. from campus.
2 ieAae-- -761-4003 or 764-7487. 15U26

IF YOU KNOW of a fenale who applied.
and was refused admission to the
Univ. as a freshman call 665-4203.
Confidentiality assured. F27
TOM AND CINDY are playful people
cats who are looking for a home with
cat-people. Must split town and leave
them. Call 761-2579. 39F27

i
w

i
_
.
3

Summer ours: 10-4 Mon..-Fri.
3Jt L
MULTI PLE
TYPING

1346 GEDDES, Near Observatory-Rooms
for men. Cooking. $45/mo. Call 668-
6906. 2Utc
THREE ROOM apt. July-on. 507 S. Di-
vision, No. 3 anytime. 45U26

"Richard, remember when you said if you
had any money you'd be buying stocks ...
well, I took our savings and..."

SE RV C E 2 BDRM. APT. Sublet, fall opt. $140/mo.
761-6829. 9U26
Thesis Service - --
Papers GIRL WANTED-Own room in newly
Dissertations remodeled old house. Julyl-Aug. 31.
General Office and Secretarial Work Call 662-6166 after 5 p.m. 10U27
Pick-Udp a d DeIvery OWN BEDROOM in house with 3 guys.
927 S. State. 769-2258. Cheap. 2U25
Available BEAUTIFUL APT., air cond., 3 lrg.
Prompt Service rms., completely furnished with art
and everything. 2 biks. from campus.
CALL 971-2446 $150 until Sept. 1. Call 662-6288 or
Jtc 761-7208. 3U26

BIKES AND SCOOTERS

The figures say 'killed in hostile action'

By ERIC SIEGEL{
EVERY SO OFTEN, the wire services
send a story to their member papers
listing the names and home cities of the
latest victims of a senseless, seemingly
interminable war.
And c it y editors in dozens of cities
across the country hand the list to re-
write men to check if anyone on the list
is a "local boy." If he is. the rewrite hack
makes a few phone calls to get some
background, and then writes up three
paragraphs that get buried under the
more important stories about new wea-
pons systems and corporate mergers,
FEW PEOPLE ARE ever made aware
of what the war involves in the simplest
of human terms. They read the numbers,
maybe even the names. But "Killed as a
result of hostile action" is a relatively in-
nocuous phrase and almost no one be-r
comes aware of the circumstances sur-

men for not humanizing the war might
be a little unfair. Few people have ever
been able to describe the grotesqueness
and savagery of war in a way that we
can all feel as well as understand. Then
again,few people have tried.
The media has been strikingly negli-
gent in trying to present the human di-
mensions of the war at all. A while back,
Life magazine published pictures of all
the men killed in a single week in.Viet-
nam. For that one week, in living rooms
and offices, the faces of the dead - and
in those- faces, the force and horror of
the war -- enveloped us.
THIS HAPPENED AGAIN a couple of
weeks ago when CBS news brought home -
the war's force and horror with a. docu-
mented report showing a South Vietna-
mese soldier murdering a Viet Cong pris-
oner. ,
Otherwise, the media has been desen-
sitizing. At the best, the dead have been
"local boys" worthy of a three paragraph

story; more often they are just statistics
and sometimes, not even that. The prose-
cution and convictions of clergymen and
others -who burn draft files is always a
front page item. But. when it comes to
delineating the moral repugnancy of the
war as it affects human beings - not
statistics - the reports are virtually non-
existent. Yet, columns and sometimes
whole pages are devoted to analysis of
Wall Street statistics. They tell us why
the stock market fell, and even how the
fall will affect Big Business.
Of course, the media isn't the only
thing to blame. The hacks are every-'
where. It- took most people in this coun-
try three or four years to learn to count
to a hundred. But the chief information
officer at the Pentagon uses that num-
ber and higher ones to report on the
number of people, US and Vietnamese,
killed in a week's time and the people
hardly bat an aye.
And don't forget the humanitarian
hacks who run the bureacuracy in Wash-
ington and who are so willing to "help"

the Sou
militarily
tape long

t h Vietnamese politically and
that won't even cut the red
enough to let a group of doc-

tors bring large numbers of napalmed
Vietnamese children to US hospitals for
treatment.
Rather remember the hard hats with
the brass buttons measure their gains in
terms of arms caches, and the political
hucksters who get on TV and talk about
saving lives, even as fresh bombs are
dropping and half a million troops are
marching.
The furor over the shooting of-students
at Kent State seems to have happened
years ago. Nevertheless, Attorney Gen-
eral Mitchell has ordered an impartial
investigation. This is the same man who
flew down to handle the investigation
at Jackson State, but wound up speak-
ing to a luncheon gathering of wealthy
Republican businessmen miles from the
black school.,
And, as with the war, we've forgotten
that the people killed are more than
statistics.

SUZUKI 305, 1968. $450 or best offer.
Ray, 761-1468. 49Z27
1970 HONDA CB 350, Call 761-1916.
50Z30
REAL ESTATE
BY OWNER-4-bdrm., 2 yr. old colonial,
on acre, AA schools, low 40's. 66377679,
NW section. 2R33
INVESTMENTS in read estate with us
yield 25% guarapteed. Mortgage se-
curity given. We pay attorney fees.
Collect_ 313-545-4296. Mr. Franklin
Delano. 1R35
PHOTO SUPPLIES
ORIGINAL black and white photog-
raphy for any occasion, portraits, etc.
quite reasonable. Or 8x10, 11x14 en-
largements from any negative $1.50-
$3.50. Call 662-6288 or 761-7208. 26D26
TICKETS
ONE WAY Ticket from London to DE-
TROIT, Aug. 6. Reasonable. 663-1649
or 662-0941. 14Q29
FLIGHT, London to Detroit, $90, June
23. D. Gray, 665-2357 or 764-4303.
13Q28
I ROUND TRIP ticket, DETROIT-LON-
'DON, June 26-Aug. 26. Call Cindy,
761-5247. 12Q27
EUROPE, one way- ticket Londor to
Detroit, June 24. $90. Call 761-5337, Ed.
4Q19
CHARTER TICKET one-way London or
Paris to Detroit in August. Contact
Ron Miller. c/o Haynes, 58 Rue de
la Notre Dame de Lorette, Paris 18,
France. 5Q28

IDEAL July-August sublet-2-3 people
for two bedroom, spacious, well fur-
nished apt.; with living; dining, and
kitchen area; balcony; very close to
campus. Negotiable. 665-2605. DU27
BARGAIN -- Man for sublet needed-
Arbor Forest Apts. $40/mo. 769-7248.
6U25
3RD GIRL-Large house, own bdrm.,
campus. Fall option. 761-3921. 8U30
PEOPLE
NEEDED
F
0
R
SUMMER
SUBLETS
761-8055
SUMMIT ASSOC.
33Utc
SUMMER RENTALS
Choice Apts. at low rates. Ann Arbor
Trust Co. Phone 769-2800. 22C83
SUMMER RENTAL
2 Bdrm. furn. unit or partial sublet
near law and business schools. Call
Professional Management Associates,
769-4227. liUtc
ROOMMATES WANTED
YOUNG professional woman seeking
roommate beginning August. Own
bedroom. Modern apt. Call 769-3680
after 6 p.m. 41Y26
PETS AND SUPPLIES
2 LOVEABLE cute male kittys with
shots-FREE. 662-4112. 5T22

June& at Arbor
10 a.m. to 9 pam.
Owens-llinois,,lnc. will pay one cent a pound for
clean and empty) bottles and jars, if they are sei
and free of metal.
It's a good chance for you and your organizati<
money and help your community. When you retu
and jars to us, you lighten the load on your refuse
You also reduce the opportunity for those bottles tc
and roadsides.
We'll make new bottles from your discards
bottles collected at Arborland will be recycled t
furnaces at Charlotte.
CASH FOR YOUR OLD ,B(

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