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June 09, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-06-09
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M Afr4ton Dattu
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.

Tuesday, June 9, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

cinema
'Women In Love': Brilliant

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 74
Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 1970

Dews Phone: 764-0552

NIGHT EDITOR: ANITA WETTERSTROEM
ard" bat's'logic
needs improvement
APPLAUDED BY President Nixon, George Meany and
many others, the "hard hats" are becoming an in-
creasingly potent political force in this country. Termed
"hard hat" because they are mostly blue collar workers,
they can all be fitted into one category-people who are
fervently patriotic.
It is not that blue collar workers and the like are the
only patriotic group in the country, it is simply that these
"hard hats" have become extremely vocal in voicing their
approval of Nixon's Indochina policies and their disap-
proval of all campus disorders. Unfortunately, recently
they have even been using "radical" tactics.
IT IS THEIR right, just as with any group, to express
their opinions on the many problems that plague this
country and it is also their right to gather in downtown
New York and scream for Mayor Lindsay's hide. But the
"hard hat" movement suffers from a large contradiction
--They are violently critical of the students' methods of
dissent, but they go right ahead and use the same methods
that they criticize.
This was clearly demonstrated Sunday in St. Louis.
A group of "hard hats," including the various blue collar
and veteran's groups, marched through the city to express
their approval of U.S. presence in Cambodia, and when
the group of 45,000 passed a house where a youn'g man, a
veteran, was holding up a sign saying, "Veteran Against
the War" 55 or 60 marchers attacked him. His mother
who tried to hold the marchers off with a water hose, was
also injured.
BY RESORTING to the kind of violence that occurred
on Sunday, these men are mimicking the same meth-
ods that they castigate students for using.
This movement has been picking up an awful lot of
support since their first rally in New York. At that time,
there were only a thousand marchers.-Now, their numbers
have swelled to over 40,000 per march. They are praised
by top administration and business leaders and their
movement shows no sign of slowing down. But if that
movement is to be as effective, it must straighten the
inconsistencies between their political ideas, and their
tactics.
-EDWARD ZIMMERMAN

By DONAL13 KUBIT
THE MOVIE industry has a ten-
dency to take a beautiful
piece of literature and destroy its
intimacy by splashing it across the
screen. Occasionally a miracle oc-
curs and a conscientious director
is able to admirably translate on
author's work. Such is the case of
Women In Love, the movie version
of D. H. Lawrence's sensual novel
directed by Ken Russell.
Lawrence is a most gifted writer
with a style that typifies great
literature. His characters are ex-
pertly drawn, his symbolic imagery
is unmatched, his details are pre-
cinct, and his themes capture the
essence of the human condition.
His enthusiasm for some mystic
form of sexuality has baffled many
and led others to worship him as
a modern prophet.
It is a frightful task for a di-
rector to even to attempt to pre-
sent some semblance of such a
complex writer, -.but Russell has
answered the call and performed
magnificiently. He displays a sen-
sitive understanding of the str>ng
personal relationships which are
at the center of Lawrence's writ-
ing and unveils the elegance of his
colorful prose. With the aid of
script writer Larry Kramer, Rus-
sell exposse the intensity ahd pas-
sion of Lawrence's novel.
Women In Love is the story of
four people in love. The ^ourtship
of an introspective school inspec-
tor, Birkin, who is attracted to a
school teacher, Ursula, and his
friend Gerald's affair with Ur-
sula's sister Gudrun.
Gerald is unable to make a
commitment to either Birkin, who
desires a bloodbrother relationship
with him, or to Gudrun, who fin-
ally rejects him and leaves him to
die in the snow as she pursues a
career as a sculptress.
The communion of these four
humans encompasses a variety of
themes in order to comprehend
their personal needs and the cre-
ation of a society where few can
live together in perfect intellectual
and instinctual harmony. Love,
hate, 1st, power, and death are the
catalysts of their relationship. The
experience of life and a knowl-
edgeable appreciation of daily liv-
ing keeps them going and Lawr-
ence's unique perception of what
life means and how it should be
lived makes his characters inter-
esting a n d thought-provoking.
Combined with this is the utiliza-
tion of beautiful colors to depict
attitudes and actions, and an
animal imagery to complete the
total picture.

THE NUDE WRESTLING scene
between Gerald and Birkin is so
well done that one feels as ex-
hausted as its participants. One is
captivated watching Gudrun dance
in front of a herd of cattle. And
although these are only two of the
best scenes, they constitute the
movie's brilliance.
The casting is excellent. Oliver
Reed (Gerald) and Jenny Linden
(Ursula), even though she re-
sembles Debbie Reynolds, are good.
Alan Bates, as Birkin, Lawrence's
alter-ego in the book, looks like
a well-fed Lawrence. But, the best
performance is by Glenda Jack-
son (Gudrun) who 'is superb as
the character who represents
Lawrence's anti-feminist view.
Since not even the best of di-
rectors could hope to match the
development an author can attain
in the space of a novel, there are
bound to be some unfavorable
points. The character, Hermione,
is a strong point in the novel and
never really surfaces to much in
the movie. This can be excused for
a lack of time, but her importance
is reduced to minimal as she is
never fully developed. Sometimes
the scenes are sketchy and simply

strung together, especially in the
beginning of the movie. 'However,
a thread of continuity Keeps them
from complete isolation. The dia-
logue is defintely Lawrence, but it.
is missing the essential build-up
so that one may infer what is ac-
tually going on. Often the utter-
ance of a serious line is 'net with
laughter, because the audience is
not ready for a somber moment.
The poetry of Lawrence's descrip-
tions is missing, but partially made
up for by the superior photo-
graphy.
Perhaps- these faults will disturb
English professors from giving
Women In Love their seal of ap-
proval, but for the average movie-
goer they are minimal and not
enough to be of any real bother.
If you can accept this film for
how well it handles what it does
in the alotted time, and not con-
demn it for what it misses it is a
truly great film; and as good a
rendition of a novel as can be ex-
pected. Granted it could never be
as good as the original work, but it
is a marvelous film, well-worth
seeing, and hopefully it will in-
spire you to reqd the book, if you
already haven't.

Letters to the Editor

Registered?
To the Editor:
I JUST WORE OUT a pair of
shoes canvassing my precinct peti-
tioning for candidacy for delegate
seat in of the county conventions.
I only needed fifteen (15) sig-
natures - the catch was that they
must be signatures of voters reg-
istered in this- precinct. Now that
doesn't seem hard until you try it.
In a precinct predominantly pop-
ulated by students more than half
of my signatures came from old
people - and I'm 23 years old.
Most of the students I approached
were not registered to vote at all.
Of those who were, few were reg-
istered where they live for four
years, summer and winter. And
then some who registered in Ann
Arbor have not bothered to change
their registration when they moved
to a new precinct. This leaves a tiny
fraction of my precinct's youth
qualified to vote here, to enter
party politics here, or even to en-
dorse a peer who wishes to chal-
lenge the system from within!

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

While Mayor Harris and his
lenient city clerk are in office,
students have not registered en
masse as it was hoped - instead
they have apathecially ignored the
opportunity using the unrespon-
siveness of the system as an ex-
cuse. Mayor Harris responded. The
parties allow any registered voter
to run for delegate seats (my pre-
cinct will have two empty seats
this fall for lack of interest). To
what must the system respond?
Apathy?
-Michael Liepman, Med.
June 7
Letters to the Editor should
be mailed to the Editorial Di-
rector or delivered to Mary
Rafferty in the Student Pub-
lications business office in the
Michigan Daily building. Let-
ters should be typed, double-
spaced and normally should not
exceed 250 words. The Editorial
Directors reserve the right to
edit all letters submitted.

The Ann Arbor Fair Housing Ordi-
nance and the University of Mich-
igan Regents' bylaws prohibit dis-
crimination in housing. Questions
should be directed to Off-Campus
Housing, 764-7400.
SPACIOUS SUITE for 1 or 2 men, pri-
vate entr., refrig. 662-3481. C32
SUMMER AND FALL, off and on cam-
pus. 761-7764. C28
2 BDRM. HOUSE, close, want couple]
now to share rent and utilities.
After 8 p.m. call Bob, 665-0580. 8C24
DOUBLE SIZE TOWNHOUSE, walk
downtown from lovely two bdrm. for
family. Many extra rms. . . photo-
graphic dkrm., family rm. w/fireplace,
1g. study. All appliances and dish-
washer. $275 pays-central ac, heat,
water. 761-4008, 725 W. Huron. Avail.
now.37Ctc
STRATFORD
629 S. FOREST
2-Bdrm. 4-Man
On Campus
Air Cond.
Parking
761-8055
50Ctc
Campus-1 Block-Fall
418 East washington-Mod. 1 bdrm.
for 2 or 3 students.
668-6906
23Ctc
AVAIL. FOR SUMME1t & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. 11Ctc
PARKLANE
511 E. HOOVER
-Lg. 1 Bdrm.
-2-4 People
-Bilevel
-Air Cond.I
-Dishwashers
--Parking{
-Laundry!
761 -8055 or 663-3809
2Ctc
TRADEW I N DS
121 E. HOOVER
-1 Bdrm. 3-Man
-2 Bdrm. 4-Man
--Bilevel
-Garbage Disposal
--Central Air cond.
-Laundry
-Parking
761-8055 or 761-9178
3Ctc

THOMAS PLAZA
914 S. STATE
1 Bdrm. 3-Man
Study Nook
Air Cond.
Laundry
Parking
761 -8055-769-4759
lCtc
FOR RENT-Bedroom in large house,
male or female, June 20-Aug.30. Neg.
Roz. 662-4049. DC26
NEED ONE GIRL to complete lovely 4-
man apartment on Thayer across the
street from Frieze Bldg. $65/month,
Call Carla at 769-0937, 764-0553. DC27
PHI ALPHA KAPPA, located one block
from the central campus, has rooms
for the summer and offers room and
board for the fall. For further infor-
mation contact, Ronald Drkse, 1010
E. Ann, Ann Arbor. Phone 761-5491.
7CR
Fall Rentals
663-0511
761-5440
Featuring Forest Terrace, 1001 S. Forest,
Mgr. In Apt. No. 211. Park Terrace,
848 Tappan, Mgr. in Apt. No. 10.
Many other 1, 2 and 3 bdrm. apts.
available on campus. 38082
711 ARCH
near State and Packard
Modern 2-bdrm. apts. for Fall
features include:
# dishwasher
0 balcony
9 air-cond.
0 and much more
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
26Ctc
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
Summit
Associates
1 AND 2 BEDROOMS
FOR FALL
-GARBAGE DISPOSALS
-AIR CONDITIONERS
-SOME DISHWASHERSI
-LAUNDRY FACILITIES
-PARKING
761-8055
4Ctc
CAMPUS
NEW FURNISHED APARTMENTS
FOR SUMMER AND FALL
at 543 CHURCH ST.
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
38Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM' VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
lOCtc
U-M Barber Shop
8:30-5:15 PM
YMonday-Saturday

I MICH IGAN
UNION

FOR RENT
2-BEDROOM furnished, quiet, close to
campus, parking. Mgr. 101-202. July-
Aug. $150/mo.-Fall 4-man, $290. 927
S. Forest, after 5 p.m. 662-6156. C35
1 GIRL over 21 for luxurious apt. 761-
1584 eves. 10C27
BUSINESS SERVICES
PIANO TEACHER - 10 yr. piano stu-
dent, studied with student of Arthur
Friedheim, will drive to your home.
769-5428, ask for Jim Tucker. 19J27
BABYSITTING Mon.-Thurs. at our
house. Parks and crafts. Call 663-0729.
20J26
Creative Wedding and Portrait Photog-
raphy by a top professional need not
be expensive, if done by RICHARD
LEE. Call 761-9452 before noon. DJtc
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER, 25 yrs.
old. Available anytime. Call Lynn,
663-2348. J28
TYPING - Cheap, professional. Quick
service. Call Candy at 665-4830 after
noon. J2
TASK
Does It All!
Typing, Printing, Transcripting-
Conferences and Mailings
Call The Professionals
761-4146 or 47
30J5C
CLASSICAL GUITAR LESSONS
Call 769-2406
18J25
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
THESES, PAPERS (inc.technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291. 42Jtc
NOW ON CAMPUS
Campus MultiService
TYPING
PRINTING
THESIS SERVICE
Fast, Dependable, Low-Priced
214 Nickels Arcade 662-4222
Summer hours: 10-4 Mon.-Fri.

SUMMER SUBLET
ROOM FOR RENT. Spacious, great lo-
cation, cooking facilities. Rent negot.
I MUST move, summer term. Call
Russ, 761-4089. 49U24
AIR-CONDITIONED STEAL - July-
Aug. 2 blocks from campus. 761-1548.
12U25
MODERN 2-man air-cond. apt. Avail-
able now thru August. Call 663-2718.
13U26
JULY-AUG. SUBLET. Solid, furn. 1%
rm. eff., free parking. Rent negoti-
able. Write or visit 630 Packard, Apt.
4. DU28
SUBLET-Available July 1st-Efficiency
apt., suitable for 1 or 2. Small but
comfortable and cheap. 906 Packard.
665-2125. 14U28
SUBLET-July 1-Aug. 31-Modern air-
cond. 1 BDRM. 2 blks. from campus.
761-4003 or 764-7487. 15U26
1346 GEDDES, Near Observatory-Rooms
formen. Cooking. $45/mo. Call 668-
6906. l2Utc
THREE ROOM apt. July-on. 507 S. Di-
vision, No. 3 anytime. 45U26
2 BDRM. APT. Sublet, fall opt. $140/mo.
761-6829. 9U26
GIRL WANTED-Own room in newly
remodeled old house. Julyl-Aug. 31.
Call 662-6166 after 5 p.m. 10U27

3Jtc

MULTI PLE
TYPING

F
L

t
F
F3
Y

Join the Peace Corps. But I wkill

By LARRY LEMPERT
AS A PROSPECTIVE CO, I often won-
der why it is the pacifist who must
endure tests of fire to be recognized.
Imagine reversing the situation, when Bill
Patterson walks in and says:
"I want to enlist."
The little man behind the desk blinks
at him in disbelief. "Pardon me, young
man?"
"I want to enlist," Bill repeats. "You
know, join the army."
The clerk blinks again and says, "Oh
my." He stands up slowly and turns to
the door leading to the next room. He
pauses and looks back at Bill. "Are you
sure?"
"Sure I'm sure. Just tell me what I have
to do," Bill doesn't understand. Why
shouldn't he want to join the army, for
Christ sakes?
The guy looked at me like I was a
cripple, Bill thinks.
BUT THERE'S nothing wrong with Bill
Patterson, the six-foot 1% inch halfback
from the Normal High undefeated Il-
linois state championship squad. He is
healthy, patriotic and he wants to join
the goddam army.
"Young man?"
"Yes."
"This way please."
Bill follows the clerk into what appears
to be a classroom. Pointing to a desk, the
clerk directs him to sit down, gives him

a set of forms to fill out, then leaves
Bill alone.
"Oh, come on," says a voice behind
him. "There are better ways to serve your
country."
Bill turns to see a bearded man in his
late twenties reading over his shoulder.
"I'm Roberts, director of the selection
section," the man smiles. "Be reasonable,
son, you could join any number of divi-
sions in the Peace Services - the Inter-
national Corps, the Domestic Corps, the
Urban Development Project, the Rural
Development Project."
"WE ALL HAVE our own ways of serv-
ing. I want to serve in the army," says.
Bill.
Roberts' smile dissolves into a frown.
"Very well. But it's not as easy as you
think." He ponders the crisis for a mo-
ment longer then says, "follow me."
They leave the room and proceed down
the long, dimly lit corridor in the base-
ment of the Federal Building. Roberts
stops at a door marked Medical Services
and knocks.
"Hey Albert, you in there?"
He knocks again, louder, then pushes
the door open.
The short, squat doctor is dozing on an
examination table. He sits upright and
grins.
"Ah, we have a customer," smiles the
doctor whose name .tag says Smit.
Smit begins the examination with busy

concentration. "Heart, ears, eyes, nose
and assorted genitalia, in that order," he
mutters while inspecting Bill. "All look
normal. Do you drink?"
"A little," Bill answers, "but sex is myl
only real vice."
"I see. But the question is, do you see?
Read that eye chart over there."
Bill looks at the chart and reads the
letters P - E - A - C - E.
"Aha!" exclaims Smit. "So you are a
pacifist? What do you say to that!"
Bill says "Aaah" until the doctor re-
moves the tongue depressor from his
mouth. Then he says, "No, I want to join
the army."
A worried expression. clouds the doc-
tor's face. "Very well. But there doesn't
seem to be anything wrong with you."
"Of course not. I just want to enlist."
SO THAT'S WHAT WRONG with you!
I was wondering." Dr. Lunii, the Sec-
tion's psychiatrist, gazes at Bill thought-
fully. "I've seen at least a dozen others
with the same malady. Quite unfortunate
really. It usually begins when they say
they want to serve their country by en-
listing."
The psychiatrist shakes his head sadly..
"You have to be crazy to want to join the
army. But you can't join the army if
you're crazy! Why, to let you enlist, we'd
have to be crazier than you are. And
you're crazy!"
"I'm crazy!" Bill yells. "I just want to

do my goddam duty by joining the god-
dam army."
Dr. Lunii puts his arm around Bill's
trembling shoulder. "You really are intent
on this aren't you," he sighs. "Very well.
There is one last thing you can try."
The psychiatrist picks up the telephone
receiver and dials. "You can file for KK,"
he says solemnly.
THE LITTLE MAN behind the desk
blinks at him in disbelief. "You're back
again. I should have known they wouldn't
be able to stop you." He looks at Bill with
wonder. "You have that determined face.
But are you sure you're a Konscientious
Killer?"
"I'm sure."
"Very well. Here's the form you'll-have
to fill out."
His eyes slip down over the questions.
"Describe the nature of your belief that
calls upon you to kill; explain how you
acquired your belief; to what extent does
your belief restrict you from participation
in the Peace Services?"
"This is ridiculous! You can't expect
me to outline my whole life philosophy on
this form!"
Bill glares once again at the question-
naire, then at the clerk. "You know some-
thing?" he says. "Someday you're gonna
have to fill out one of these forms if you
don't want to enlist!"
"Applying for special status because
you don't want to kill?" the clerk chuc-
kles. "That'll be the day."

eO%
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oce o atop
bo eol '
G

SERVICE
Thesis Service
" Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 971-2446
HELP WANTED
NAT'L. CORP. opening an AA branch
needsneathand aggressivencollege
students with cars for full arid part
time employment. No exp. nec. Call
662-7020 between 12 and 5 for inter-
view appointment. 35H27
AMERICAN MALE U.M. students need-
ed for 11-2 hr. Psych. exp., pay $4.00
plus winnings. 764-3276 or 764-3278
between 8 am. and 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri
. H27
LOOKING for a job in any field-call
Detroit: 1-255-5075 and ask for Bud1
Meadows. 33H28
NEED BABYSITTER-Full time, room
and board, or pay. Call 461-1008. 34H26
SMALL LOCAL hospital needs experi-
enced X-ray technician who would
like night and weekend call. Phone
eves., 761-5532. 28H24
STATION ATTENDANTS, preferably fe-
male. Super-Test, S. Main and E.
Madison, contact Jack Toth, super-
visor, in person. Summer or perma-
nent. 26H28
GRADUATE STUDENT
Exchange room and board for 15 brs.
housework .Mon.-Fri., weekends off,
transportation necessary. 663-2379 or
764-0497. 231124
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
FOR SALE--2 bicycles (boy's 26" Sch-
winn), 1 girl's bicycle (26"). Call 971-
3450 after 3 p.m. ZX
RENT A TV
or
AIR CONDITIONER
Special Student Rates
Shot or ongTrm
H I FI STU DIO
21W. Washington
668-y942

OWN BEDROOM in house with 3 guys
927 S. State. 769-2258. Cheap. 2U251
BEAUTIFUL APT., air cond., 3 lrg.
rms., completely furnished with art
and everything. 2 blks. from campus.
$150 until Sept. 1. Call 662-6288 or
761-7208, 3U26_
IDEAL July-August sublet-2-3 people
for two bedroom, spacious, well fur-
nished apt.; with living, dining, and
kitchen area; balcony; very close to
campus. Negotiable. 665-2605. DU27
SUBLET now thru Aug.-Own lrg. bed-
room in cool basement apartment.
Total rent is $160. 769-5904. 4U24
3 GIRLS NEEDED to sublet mod. 4-man
apt. July and August. Air condition-
ing, sundeck, ample parking. Call
761-6388 after 5 p.m. 5U24
BARGAIN - Man for sublet needed-
Arbor Forest Apts. $40/mo. 769-7248.
6U25
3RD GIRL-Large house, own bdrm.,
campus. Fall option. 761-3921. 8U30
PEOPLE
NEEDED
F
0
R
SUMMER
SUBLETS
761-8055
SUMMIT ASSOC.
33Utc
SUMMER RENTALS
Choice Apts. at low rates. Ann Arbor
Trust Co. Phone 769-2800. 22C83
SUMMER RENTAL
2 Bdrm. fern, unit or partial sublet
near law and business- schools. Call
Professional Management Associates,
769-4227. flUtc
FOR SALE
AIR CONDITIONER, 8,000 B.T.U., 115
volts, flush window mounting, used
two summers. $175. After 6:00 p.m.
483-0145. 32B28
FOR SALE--2 bicycles boy's 26" Sch-
Winn), 1 girl's bicycle (26"). Call 971-
3450 after 3 p.m. BX
BRASS DOUBLE BED, etching, strip-
ped, side poles, $60. Spindle double
bed, side polies, walnut finish, $50.
663-8835. 33B26
ARMCHAIR $12: Moby desk, $10, yel-
low table and 41aqua chairs, $15-
etc., etc. Call 761-6844. 341125
DOUBLE BOX SPRING and mattress
and frame, very firm, $60. Call 761-
6844. 35B26
ARCHITECTS-ENGINEERS
30x42 Mayline drafting table with bar.
Hardly used. $150 when new. Stool-
included $45 or best offer. Call 764-
0510. 31B25
TRANSPORTATION
CHICK looking for another Chick to
share experiences and driving on long
camping trip to California. Mary H-.
1-871-4728 or 1-875-7259. 24029
INDIA Overland. $204, regular trips. 39
Landsdowne Gardens, London, S.W. 8,
U.K. 501
NEED RIDE to Traverse City June 12
or 19. Call 769-5412 for Jackie. G271
PETS AND SUPPLIES
RETRIEVER FREE to good home. 665-
0575 after 12 p.m. 3T28
CUTE KITTEN to good home. 769-6560.
6T24
2 LOVEABLE cute male kittys with
shots-FREE. 662-4112. 5'T22

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