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June 09, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-09
Note:
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Page Six

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 9, 1970

Tuesday, June 9, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t

1

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

NINE CZECHOSLOVAKS yesterday hijacked a Czechoslo-
vak airliner at pistol point, forced it to land in Nuernberg, West
Germany and asked for political asylum there.
Nuernberg police said they would withhold the names of the
nine - four men, four women and a two-year-old child - in order
to protect their families. Police said the group had fled to the West
for political and economic motives.
Five of the nine who held guns on the crew and passengers of
the aircraft were later charged by Prague officials with forcible de-
tention, coercion and making threatening actions, police reported.
Nuernberg police said the group of Czechoslovaks apparently
had planned the hijacking well.
* A *
THE AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT has agreed to settle
for $77,014 a government claim of $693,000 against a Virginia
processor for spoiled chicken donated to an African nation in
1963.
The claim, lodged two years ago, involved about half a million
cans of exotically flavored chicken shipped to the Republic of the
Congo under the U.S. Food-for-Peace program.
Congolese importers were reimbursed $693,000 in local curriencies
after spoilage was found in the shipment. The Agency for Interna-
tional Development, which handled the transaction, passed the bill
to the Agriculture Department as the original financing agency.
* * *
MORE THAN HALF of the 31,000 American troops sent into
Cambodia have been withdrawn to South Vietnam, informed
sources yesterday reported.
At the same time, Thailand was reported considering the dis-
patch of its 12,000-man Black Panther Division, now-in Vietnam, to
a Cambodian trouble spot 80 miles from the Thai border.
Informants in Thailand's capital said the Thai Government be-
lieves that the thrust of Communist command forces around two
Cambodian cities is "a grave threat to Thailand."
However, pressure from the Viet Cong in that area eased yester-
day after Cambodian troops and planes pushed North Vietnamese
forces off Siem Reap, an airstrip taken Sunday, while other Cam-
bodian forces drove Viet Cong from another city in central Cam-
bodia.
U.S. military sources in Saigon said they had heard nothing
about any Thai troop move into Cambodia from South Vietnam.
Thailand has said in the past that it would help the government of
Cambodia if needed.
THE COMMANDERS-IN-CHIEF of Argentina's army, navy
and air force yesterday announced that Jaun Carlos Ongania had
been disposed as president and that they were taking over the
government.
A communique broadcast over the government-operated radio
network said the armed forces commanders had decided to assume
"immediately" the political leadership of the country. "As a result,"
the communique continued, "Lt. Gen. Jaun Carlos Ongania has been
removed from his duties as president of the nation."
A later announcement said a new president would be named with-
in 10 days.
Newsmen at Government House said Ongania was barricaded in-
side the building and protected by 1,200 heavily armed cavalry troops.
The crisis began yesterday morning when Ongania rejected an
army demand, backed by the navy and air force, that he adopt a
"political plan" under which he would share power with the armed
forces and consult with civilian leaders.
After rejecting the demand Ongania then dismissed the army
commander and said he would assume personal command of Argen-
tina's 135,000-man army.
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SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

Neal to seek
House seat
Bruce Neal, a research manager
for the F o r d Motor Co. and a
peace candidate, yesterday an-
nounced his candidacy for t h e
Democratic nomination for Con-
gress in the Second Congressional'
District.
Neal issued a statement of can-
didacy and called for the "prompt
withdrawal" of troops from Indo-
china.
"The policies o u r government
has followed o v e r recent years
have createdan economy that is
truly in a dangerous condition,
and a country that is deeply di-
vided over the Indochina war,"
Neal said. "The rhetoric of the
Nixon/Agnew statements is ap-
pealing to our fears and increas-
ing the hostilities we have among
us."
Neal concluded that in seeking
the office, he wanted to "add my
voice and vote" to those trying to
e n d U.S. involvement in Indo-
china.
In criticizing the war, Neal said
that "our nation's vital interests
are not and never have been at
stake in this conflict."

Ua

OBSERVERS WANTED
For
Color Vision Experiments
You must be Red-Green Color Blind
2--6 hours per week
Rates: $1.75 per hr.
CALL: S. Miller-764-0574
or walk in-5080 Kresge I I
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Ann at Forest

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Minor clash
occurs at
Seale rally
CHICAGO (M -Several per-
sons smashed a -plate glass
door yesterday at the Federalt
Building during an outdoor
rally for Bobby Seale, chair-;
man of the Black Panther
party.
Seale, 33, who is being held in
New Haven, Conn., on charges of
conspiracy to kidnap and commit
murder, was scheduled' to go on
trial yesterday b-e f o r e Judge J.
Hoffman of U.S. District Court
on charges of conspiracy to in-
cite rioting at the time of the1
1968 Democratic National Con-_
vention.
The crowd in the Federal Build-
ing plaza listened to speeches urg-
ing the release of Seale and other
Black Panthers serving prison}
sentences.I
Three of the rally speakers
were David Dellinger, Rennie Da-E
vis and Lee Weiner, members of
the Conspiracy 7 and codefen-
dants of Seale until he was sev-
ered from the others and grantedl
a separate trial.
Dellinger, Davis and three oth-
ers were convicted in February of
crossing state lines to incite riot-
ing, but were acquitted of con-
spiring to do so. Two defendants,
Weiner and John R. Froines, were
acquitted of both charges, but all
seven were sentenced at the end
of the trial to jail terms for con-
tempt of court.I
Davis told the crowd, "We mean
to free Bobby Seale . . . by any
means necessary." He also called
for an assault on the New Haven
jail where Seale is being held.
"When I say an assault," he
said, "we mean an assault. We
mean it. We mean it."
O Weddings and
Portraits
a by&
The.
Photographer
S ---Richard Lee---
761-9452 u
o before noon
)--OumOon ~

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-Associated Press

Task force heads

Voters d
bon ds, m.
By HARVARD VA
Ann Arbor voters yesterday de
parts of a complex school bond iss
proposals, one for the Ann Arbor pu
proposed vocational education cente
In addition voters returned inc
to the city school board and elect
University law professor, and Rol
officer.
A proposed millage increase of
--or $3.10 on each $1,000 of assess
have provided approximately 40 ne'
system designed to cope with prob]
with slow learners and of m -
discipline.
The proposed one mill for the
vocational education center - de-

i --

TODAY

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Vice-Chairman Neal Staebler, left, and Chairman Thomas B.
Curtis head a task force on congressional campaign finances
which reported yesterday that 1968 congressional candidates
reported less than one-fifth of their campaign spending to the
federal government as required under law. The private study
panel yesterday called for removal of the "unenforceable" and
"ineffective" law.
CALIFORNIA TRIBE:
Indians thw-arted in
land claim attempts.

feated for the second time in two
years-would have raised $5 mil-
lion to build and equip the center.
Both Good and Carrington, sup-
ported the bond and millage pro-
posals and are considered to be
liberals. Robert Conn opposed the
additional taxation and received
the "law and order vote," accord-c
ing to Good.

LAST CHANCE TO BEGIN
BRIDGE
LESSONS

Beginners .............................. 7 P.M.
For those who want to improve their game . . 9 P.M.
$10 for the Room 3b
10 week course MICHIGAN UNION
DEMONSTRATIONS ARE IGNORED,
TELEGRAMS HAVE NOT WORKED,
THE WAR CONTINUES . . .
MAKE CONGRESS STOP THE WAR
HELP ELECT PEACE CANDIDATES TO CONGRESS
COME TO THE
MASS MEETING
MOVEMENT FOR A NEW CONGRESS
Wednesday. June 10 7:30 P.M.

BIG BEND, Calif. IP)--Activist
American Indians were thwarted
yesterday by government agencies
on two fronts-at Pacific Gas
and Electric Co. (PG&E) land
in NorthernCalifornia and at Al-
catraz Island in San Francisco
Bay, 350 miles to the south.
Fifty to 75 Indians moved on
Police arrest
Parsons for
'obscene' word
Robert Parsons, '70, was arrested
by an Ann Arbor police officer
Friday and charged with obscene
language in front of a woman, a
violation of a clause in the Ann
Arbor City Code.
Parsons said he was talking to
Engineering Prof. John Young on
the sixth floor of the Ann Arbor
City Hall at the time of his
arrest. Parsons allegedly used the
word "fucking" in his conversa-
tion with Young. A woman em-
ploye working at a desk behind
Parsons overheard the obscenity
and cautioned him to watch his
language. A police officer made
the arrest immediately.

I

UGLI Multipurpose Room
"MOBILIZE FOR PEACE"

SPECIAL JUNE
STEREO SALE
Hundreds of "Specials"
* receivers 0 changers
" speakers 0 hi fi
" musical instruments
HI-FI STUDIO
121 W. Washington
Downtown, across from Old
German Restaurant-668-7942

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to the PG&E employes, camp-
ground near Lassen Volcanic Na-
tional Park and were told once
again to leave.
In San Francisco Bay, more
than 80 Indians occupying Alca-
traz Island failed in their initial
efforts to raise money by boating
tourists, at $5 apiece, to the form-
er federal prison.
The Indians, who have occu-
piedhthe island sinceNov. 20, 1969,
loaded up 20 tourists and got
about 200 yards off Fisherman's
Warf when U.S. Atty. James
Browning, through a Coast Guard
radio, ordered them back. A Coast
Guard cutter stood by near the
island to prevent a landing.
The Indians didn't resist and
returned the disappointed pale-
faces to the wharf.
Meanwhile, the Indians' San
Francisco attorney, Aubrey Gross-
man, said he would file a petition
charging the utility company with
trespassing on land that right-
fully belongs to the Pit River
tribe.
The tribe, numbering between
500 and 1,000. claims extensive
federal land at the northeast cor-
ner of the state.
The federal government con-
tends the Pits agreed to give up
rights to the land in recent years
in return for their share of a $29
million settlement for all Califor-
nia Indians, a sum now grown to
$35 million with accumulated in-
terest.
The tribe recently voted. how-
ever to refuse the payment.
WOW !
A three - piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinner, plus french fries,
for only _79c! Larger take-home
orders also. Try Lobox soon !Im
MILINO PoE Y ERIC
West of Arborland

7 Collins uro t

Good added that the election
gave a five to four majority to
liberals on the city's school board.
Referring to the defeat of the
millage and bond issues, Superin-,
tendent of schools W. Scott Wes-
terman said he was "deeply dis-
tressed." He said that there was
"no question" that there would
have to be a reduction in staff by
as many as 80 to 100 positions in
spite of an expected increase in
student enrollment. He added that
there was a possibility of some
teachers being layed off.
-Westerman said the defeat of
the bonding issues-which were to
provide funds for new school con-
struction and renovation as well
as a library addition-would seri-
ously hurt efforts to alleviate the
already "critical space shortage"
in the city's schools.
With all but one of the 40 pre-
cincts reported, returns were Car-
rington 7,283; Good 6563; and
ronn 6546. Trailing behind Conn
by more than 200 votes in a field
of 11 candidates was Mrs. Patri-
cia Shipman, a conservative who
supported the millage and bond'
issues.
The five separate bonding issues'
were each defeated by margins of,
three to two or more.

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Om SOMETHING ABOUT
WATER POLLUTION

AND EARN MONEY
THE SAME TIME

AT

The most
electrifying
ritual ever
seen!
z . see

Seven persons were excused as
prospective jurors in the John
Collins case this morning, as the
court continues its efforts to as-
semble an unbiased jury. -
Prosecuting Atty. William F.
Delhey and Defense Counsel Jo-
seph Louisell began making per-
emptory challenges at his morn-
ing's hearings.
Delhey excused the wife of a
University professor in the Col-
lege of Architecture and Design on
the grounds that she had served
on a jury last month which re-
turned a not guilty verdict in an-
other criminal case.
A Manchester housewife took
the jury place of the professor's
wife on -the panel after Circuit
Court Judge John W. Conlin over-
ruled the objections raised by the
defense attorney. Louisell chal-

lenged
she h
male
the ji
lins v
The
the tw
had a
not k
perso
Lou
would
the. pi
.jurors
Lion i
becaus
been
who
Collin;
Judi
.jectior
ures v4
tain t
the h
the pa
As
challei
sonsa
sembb,
tion.
Coll
der of
basema
David
uncle
lice c
while
tion la

HELD
OVER

Full or part-time
saleswork available

BESTLINE PRODUCTS
CAMPUS INN-WED., JUNE 10
7:45 P.M.
or call 769-1348

The strange ritual of love be-
tween the Indian- Princess and
the white man.
The torture of the white man as
he fights to become an Indian
warrior.
ANAV ISION*TECHNICOLR*
GsPPARENTAL GUIDANCE
SUGGESTED
SHOWS AT:
1-3-5-7-905 P.M.
A

Student Book Service
NOW OPEN
EVENINGS
7.00-10:30
many nice books
1215 S. UNIVERSITYr
761-0700
Open daytime beginning
June 22nd

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