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August 18, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1971-08-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesdoy, August 18, 1971

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, August 18, 1971

10-7
MON. SAT.
7h/e Wie'qp
347 Mayna rd St.
PURVEYOR OF THE WORLD'S FINEST WINES
HARJY,'CRAZY JACK'DOWN AT THE
WAGON WERKES SEZ WE NEED SHOCKS
ON THE VOLKSWAGON?! -°
Hary, we only got /
82 WmiesnAn harb car,
f , ..HARREY!!
WAGON WERKE 1245 Rosewood in Ann Arbor 662-2576

Ahmad scores U.S. foreign policy

(Continued fronm Page 1)
take of over-trust in the govern-
ment, and not pushing government
agencies to be responsible to the
people."
Ahmad's remarks were part of
the opening day of meetings of
the national conference of the
C&LC, a conference which lead-
ers hope will awaken members of
religious communities to what
C&LC organizers consider "il-
legal" actions of the American
government.
Formerly called Citizens and
Laymen Concerned about Viet-
nam (CALCAV), C&LC shortened
their name to indicate a broader
field of concern.
"Ending the war in Vietnam is
still our ultimate goal," says
C&LC Co-Director Rev. Richard
Fernandez, "but we base to de-
mythologize our task first. A
conference isn't the way to end
the war - it's a way to energize
people."
I order to accomplish this
goal, conference organizers are
planning activities which they
consider to be "substantially dif-
ferent from what many tradi-
tional denominational structures
have attempted to do with re-
spect to the war," Fernandez, a
Protestant minister asserts.
Instead of scheduling many
speakers to address the members
in large groups, C&LC represen-
tatives plan to discuss strategy
and tactics in small groups and
workshops. This will presumably
preserve the sense of community

which they call vital to religious
awareness.
Through the consciousness-
raising possibilities of these dis-
cussions, leaders of the confer-
ence hope to bring information
to all participants which they in
turn can share with their con-
stituencies.
Conference organizers, how-
ever, are trying to do more than
merely dispense information.
Says Barbara Fuller, director of
the local Interfaith Council for
Peace, "We're going to spend
time defining the problem and
looking for ways to change the
root causes of the war. We must
put a stop to a system which
lets wars like Vietnam start."
Although many anti-war con-
ferences have been labeled "un-
successful" because of their lack
of concrete results, participants
in the C&LC conference are con-

fident that theirs will be an ef-
fective attempt.
According to Ahmad, the con-
ference has four distinct advan-
tages over other similar peace
conference.
"First, we have seen that
members of C&LC bring with
them the sence of urgency and
accomplishment which will make
them more ready for their pres-
ent task:
Second, this is not a meeting
of disparate groups, but of simi-
lar people who will tend to form
a more cohesive working unit;
Third, all of the participants
have constituencies to which
they can transfer any informa-
tion which they receive;
And fourth, the conference has
already defined its terms and
objectives. A definition of goals
will make those goals more
readily attainablg."

Salary increases in doubt
(continued from Page 1) That revenue reportedly could
ruled illegal but the University be as much as $6 million.
is allowed to collect the new
higher tuition rates, as expect- T 1 Ori
ed, the University could wind Tuition to rise
up with a large amount of un-
anticipated revenue. demic year, a hike of $140, while
non-resident tuition is increased
Daily Official Bulletin from $1,940 to $2,240.
wEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18 -Professional schools. In-state
law school tuition will increase
u-M scientology: "Freedom," UGLI $100, raising student fees to $900
Multipurpose Rm, every hr., 11 a.m - a year, while non-resident tuition
a P.M. will be up $2,400 from $2,300.
Medical, dental and public health
schools will increase tuition $100
AIR PORT for both in-state and out-of-state
students.
LIM0"USIN ES
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
for information call aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
971-3700 Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
Tickets are available day through Sunday morning Univer-
of Truvel Bureaus or sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
the Michigan Union Summer Session published Tuesday
32 T 'Da4lsithrough Saturday morning. Subscrip-
rips tion rates: 5S by carrier, $5 by maii.

4

! I" I I 11 - I I

° '' .

-.4i

V

mosaic patterns with
the Lanz touch for Miss J
swing out this fall in a
soft little dress.
The purple polyester skirt
is outlined with black and
topped with purple cotton
velour. 5-13 sizes. $40.
* 6j Aoj

"Niggas have a good time, so we will all have a good time
watching them. Niggas have an especially good time dying.
They have been dying for four hundred years. Niggas sleep
with resigned Nigga women and it's like dying. 'Die, Niggas,'
says a poem by David Nelson, 'so BLACK FOLKS can take
over'
RIGHT ON! is percussive and exclamatory and funny and
murderous; stirring and chilling, about making love and war.
This is pure, brilliant propaganda for Black Power, and it
is certainly art.
The visual style of the film is spectacular. The words beat
out like bones on drumskins. There is no hysteria; much cold
humor, resentment, love, energy; a mischievous pretense at
torpor; and bottomless ire."
Penelope Gilliat, NEW YORKER
What is Imamu Barak (Leroi Jones) talking about when he
calls RIGHT ON! "revolutionary revelation?"
Why do enormously vital young Harlem poets choose to call
themselves "the LAST Poets?"

eo

9

I

Jaoob on

TONIGHT-Thursday-Friday
7:30,9:15,11 p.rn $1 cant
ARM at the Alley-330 Maynard

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